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The RPG Sanctum - #6:Sexism in RPGs

RosestormRosestorm Host of The SectorcastFull Members
edited April 2011 in Latest Updates
Have you ever thought that RPGs were sexist, just ever so much? In this episode, our panel will examine such fascinating subjects as Miranda's butt in ME2, and the clothing mechanic of The 3rd Birthday. It is also slightly possible that the Ar Tonelico games will be mentioned in passing.

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Be sure to leave any feedback for us on this thread and leave some reviews on itunes. The next show topic is the optimum length for RPGs, how short is to short, how long is to long. If you want to submit content, e-mail me a mp3 file to [EMAIL="rosestorm90@gmail.com"]rosestorm90@gmail.com[/EMAIL], if you need instructions on how to make one e-mail me and I will be more than willing to help. If you have any ideas for future shows topics or formats ideas feel free to post them here or e-mail me.
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Comments

  • NyxNyx Staff Girly Girl RPGamer Staff
    edited April 2011
    FYI: There be massive spoilers for Ar tonelico Qoga and the 3rd Birthday here. If you don't want to be spoiled, DON'T LISTEN!
  • Strawberry EggsStrawberry Eggs The Bemused Administrators
    edited April 2011
    I do apologize for not speaking up much in this episode. It wasn't because the others monopolized the time or anything. Since the elephants in the room (3rd Birthday and Ar Tonelico) were addressed right off the bat, I felt silly dialing it down to something more mundane, like the lack of main female protagonists in JRPGs or the like. My Internet connection was also misbehaving.

    Though I do want to mention a little more about Pok
    " I think this is why aging makes humans die! "
  • caddyalancaddyalan Member Full Members
    edited April 2011
    It's depressing to admit this, but I believe that video games as a whole can be cynically described as "fanboys creating and marketing games for fanboys." The same can be said for many movies, and a lot of comic books. But at the same time, we have decades of movies in English aimed at women, and since the 90s, there has been a slow increase in comics for women (especially webcomics, translated shoujo, josei, and BL manga). I believe that video games regardless of genre are slowly emerging from their "no girls allowed" history.

    No matter how far you look back into video game history, you can find countless examples of games that cater to the interests of guys. Twenty years ago, the core demographic was boys whose parents could afford to buy video games. These days, I think the core demographic includes teen guys and men... people who can afford to buy the latest serious business sports game / FPS / action game.

    In terms of how women are portrayed in video games, the lucky fictional characters are women who can fight, and wear reasonable clothes. Every now and then there's a female lead who isn't even sexy (such as Alis from Phantasy Star 1, Cornet from Rhapsody, and the main character in Atelier Annie). The typical fictional woman used to be a girl who needed rescuing, or a relatively weak support character. Until maybe the Playstation era, video game women weren't typically sexy in western games... except for box art and posters. These days, you can find all kinds of sleaze in M-rated games.

    Slowly, the "fanboys only" trend is changing, as companies and creators have tried to make games for people outside the core male demographic. I can't honestly say that they've always succeeded. For instance, the DS game Super Princess Peach is not meant to be taken seriously, but it's rather embarrassing... And generally speaking, games aimed at young girls don't get much development money or press, and are usually relegated to bargain bins.

    The adage "sex sells" is distressingly true in all forms of entertainment. So if you want more tasteful, well-written video games that don't go out of their way to pander, you have to look for them. Likewise, "money talks" is depressingly true. So if you want more games that aren't absurdly sexist, you would be wise to purchase them. (I'm trying to think of a few that are still in print... if you like PC/Mac indie games, then consider supporting Spirited Heart or perhaps the Vera Blanc series.)
  • LordKaiserLordKaiser Under watcher Full Members
    edited April 2011
    Well in old RPGs females where only mages and the principal woman that often was the love interest also was in that time weak healers. But now we had females using more weapons etc. etc. like Rachel from Wild Arms 4 who also happened to be covered up. Do you women see fan service targeted to males as sexism?
    Never buy a game published by D3 Publisher that is not WKCII. They cheated on their fans by releasing a game that they didn't support not even for a year and they released a rushed translation.
  • DarkRPGMasterDarkRPGMaster A Witness to Destruction Moderators
    edited April 2011
    That's a good question Kaiser, I'm wondering that now too. Also, how do you women feel about all the guys set up for women to like?

    EDIT: About Maeda acting like he did...well, he was
    Spoiler:
    obsessed with her mitochondria in PE1
    right? Well, it seems to be the same kind of obsession here to me.

    I do agree about the out of ammo sound though...personally I think she should have just gone "Sh**!" Also, I noticed how you didn't mention how badass she became after Episode 2. After that episode, I actually liked her just as much as I did in PE1 and PE2.

    One last note...you didn't mention how hard it is to completely destroy her clothing. Over the course of the game I only saw it once. Then again, it could be that I'm somewhat skilled, and that I repaired the clothes the second I could.
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  • PawsPaws BEARSONA RPGamer Staff
    edited April 2011
    LordKaiser said:
    Well in old RPGs females where only mages and the principal woman that often was the love interest also was in that time weak healers. But now we had females using more weapons etc. etc. like Rachel from Wild Arms 4 who also happened to be covered up.

    Here's the thing though -- archetypal roles which put women in a healing capacity aren't that far off from the truth. In MMORPGs, we see over and over again female players tend to gravitate towards healer and ranged DPS roles -- finding a girl as a main tank or a melee class like a rogue is far less prevalent.
  • noodlenoodle Kirby: El Presidente RPGamer Staff
    edited April 2011
    *looks at her beastmaster in FFXI*

    *whistles innocently, pushing her main job white mage under the rug*
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • LordKaiserLordKaiser Under watcher Full Members
    edited April 2011
    Paws said:
    Here's the thing though -- archetypal roles which put women in a healing capacity aren't that far off from the truth. In MMORPGs, we see over and over again female players tend to gravitate towards healer and ranged DPS roles -- finding a girl as a main tank or a melee class like a rogue is far less prevalent.

    You mean female gamers or female avatars? Because most of them are males at least that was my experience in WKC.
    Never buy a game published by D3 Publisher that is not WKCII. They cheated on their fans by releasing a game that they didn't support not even for a year and they released a rushed translation.
  • PawsPaws BEARSONA RPGamer Staff
    edited April 2011
    Right, I'm not saying "every chick lolheals" -- I played a tank (male human paladin) for a couple years in WoW. Also, I mean female players.
  • DarkRPGMasterDarkRPGMaster A Witness to Destruction Moderators
    edited April 2011
    Oddly enough, I notice alot of female stealth classes. I guess that's why they're able to steal your soul...they sneak their way in.
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  • OcelotOcelot is not declawed RPGamer Staff
    edited April 2011
    Paws said:
    Here's the thing though -- archetypal roles which put women in a healing capacity aren't that far off from the truth. In MMORPGs, we see over and over again female players tend to gravitate towards healer and ranged DPS roles -- finding a girl as a main tank or a melee class like a rogue is far less prevalent.

    Studies on why this is, however, show that it's not necessarily that women pick healers because they naturally prefer that role, although a certain percentage of female healers do so. A lot of women are introduced to MMORPGs by male partners, who take a "lead" DPS/tank role and ask their wife/girlfriend to play a healer. I don't think anybody's done a statistical analysis separating women who are lifelong gamers or who discovered MMORPGs on their own from women who were introduced by male partners, but I'd love to see those results. Just from what I've seen personally, I suspect you'll see a more even spread of classes in that group of women. (Interestingly, there are 5 women in my 12 person WoW raid roster. We play a paladin tank, druid tank/DPS caster, shaman healer, priest healer/DPS caster, and rogue. That's a very even role spread, but we're also an older/more independent group of women.)
    Becky Cunningham, Staff-at-Large
    Twitter: BeckyCFreelance
  • QuinQuin ne cede malis RPGamer Staff
    edited April 2011
    Ocelot said:
    Studies on why this is, however, show that it's not necessarily that women pick healers because they naturally prefer that role, although a certain percentage of female healers do so. A lot of women are introduced to MMORPGs by male partners, who take a "lead" DPS/tank role and ask their wife/girlfriend to play a healer. I don't think anybody's done a statistical analysis separating women who are lifelong gamers or who discovered MMORPGs on their own from women who were introduced by male partners, but I'd love to see those results. Just from what I've seen personally, I suspect you'll see a more even spread of classes in that group of women. (Interestingly, there are 5 women in my 12 person WoW raid roster. We play a paladin tank, druid tank/DPS caster, shaman healer, priest healer/DPS caster, and rogue. That's a very even role spread, but we're also an older/more independent group of women.)

    Hmmmm, if I can't carry out my current study for my final year project, this sounds like a good alternative. Thanks, Oce.
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  • SpartakusSpartakus One Knight Stand Full Members
    edited April 2011
    It seems a boorish, puritanical criticism that women in games are too attractive and I would say the same for men. If you have an imaginary world of your creation there is no reason not to have idealized, beautiful and sexy characters of all genders. On the contrary, I'd rather play a game with unrealistically attractive characters than realistically ugly ones, and it seems most consumers agree. Aesthetics are an essential part in the enjoyment of all creative expressions. That anyone could feel threatened by the appearance of a fictional character can only mean that person has serious confidence issues that should be adressed before he/she starts worrying about anything else. I don't see this as chauvinism either; both men and women want to look attractive and be desired. If someone has the body to pull off a skimpy outfit I say good for them. If you don't - like me - it doesn't mean you can't enjoy beauty in others or revel in pretending you're attractive too for a little while.
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  • Rya_ReisenderRya_Reisender Solipsist Snowflake Full Members
    edited April 2011
    Women and men are completely different from each other even in real life. It is foolish to think that they are equal and just "displayed" unequal in games.

    Also I like my games being designed so that I enjoy them and not so that they represent reality well. Girls taking off/losing their clothes is simply "yay", but it doesn't cause me to ask my girlfriend to take off her clothes to see if that makes her power increase.
  • OcelotOcelot is not declawed RPGamer Staff
    edited April 2011
    Those of us who are sick and tired of female characters in chainmail bikinis aren't tired of them because they're "too attractive" or because we have a problem with sex or sexuality. For me, it's a problem of characterization. Female characters in ridiculously skimpy outfits tend to be placed in games primarily as sexualized objects rather than strong characters in their own right. Even if they have been given a half-decent story and a decent personality, the way they're dressed tends to undermine that personality. There are occasional characters, like Kain
    Becky Cunningham, Staff-at-Large
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  • OcelotOcelot is not declawed RPGamer Staff
    edited April 2011
    Rya.Reisender said:
    Women are men are completely different from each other even in real life. It is foolish to think that they are equal and just "displayed" unequal in games.

    Man, we're really not that different. We as a society have a tendency to overstate the differences between the genders, generally in a way that is detrimental to the ability of women to achieve their life goals (though not always... I dislike it when women get together and laugh at how "stupid" men are just as much as I dislike that kind of thing from men.)
    Becky Cunningham, Staff-at-Large
    Twitter: BeckyCFreelance
  • jason_150457jason_150457 New Member Full Members
    edited April 2011
    will there be an rss feed for the show in the future? since i dont have itunes, rss is the bestway for me to catch up on latest content
  • MacstormMacstorm Ysy St. Administrators
    edited April 2011
    "The universe is already mad. Anything else would be redundant."
    Twitter @FinalMacstorm
  • RosestormRosestorm Host of The Sectorcast Full Members
    edited April 2011
    Macstorm said:

    There is the link to my rss feed, I hope it helps
    Deputy Editor of Gamersector.com
    Check out my podcast Sectorcast, http://gamersector.com/podcast/sectorcast
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  • SpartakusSpartakus One Knight Stand Full Members
    edited April 2011
    I think there are some pitfalls to avoid here though.

    We can't work towards a situation where it's not legitimate to have a character that is there mainly to be a sexualized object - these are, after all, enjoyable - but you can hardly tell an engaging story if that's the only kind of character you have to offer. It must be left up the creators' to figure out the right balance for their game. I'd agree there is a far greater tendency for characters of that mould to be female, which is an obvious consequence of the predominantly male gaming demographic. I think Japanese game developers do a great job of sexualizing both genders though, whereas Western developers tend to shield their male characters from it. Compare say male characters from Mass Effect and Final Fantasy.

    I also don't see any contradiction between skimpy clothing and believable characterization. The first comes down to design, the other to writing. Of course you could argue a skimpily clad character is begging not to be taken seriously, but this is presuming the norms of the fantasy world are similar to some of our IMO more unfortunate ones. If you have a very well written character I see no reason to depreciate him/her because of clothing or physique; it's not as if an interesting personality is "validated" by being flatchested and dressed in a burqa and "devalidated" by big breasts and a miniskirt. I want characters that are both sexy and well-written.

    [QUOTE=Ocelot]Not to mention that lack of clothing doesn't necessarily equal sexiness. I personally (as a bi woman) find it far more attractive to see a woman who dresses confidently and in a way that works for who she is than who inappropriately dresses like a stripper. I know a good number of hetero men who feel the same way about both real and fictional women.

    It's not so much the lack of or amount of clothing as the type of clothing. A long dress with a split up to the hip can be just as sexy as a small skirt. Of course, real life clothing is a different matter entirely.
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  • QuinQuin ne cede malis RPGamer Staff
    edited April 2011
    Ocelot said:
    Not to mention that lack of clothing doesn't necessarily equal sexiness.

    Ah, the Theiss Titillation Theory.
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  • Rya_ReisenderRya_Reisender Solipsist Snowflake Full Members
    edited April 2011
    Ocelot said:
    Man, we're really not that different. We as a society have a tendency to overstate the differences between the genders, generally in a way that is detrimental to the ability of women to achieve their life goals (though not always... I dislike it when women get together and laugh at how "stupid" men are just as much as I dislike that kind of thing from men.)
    Of course there are always exceptions and I'm pretty sure you are one (you are playing RPGs after all), but I could create you a list of 'abilities' that apply to more than 80% to women but less than 20% to men. There is a clear difference. The way I talk with women usually is so completely different from how I talk with men. Men can't really have women as normal friends, it will always cause trouble eventually, if you try it. Too much differences. *-*;

    But that's not even the point. If the game is directed towards males, the women in it should be how the male wishes. The reason why there are strong-willed women at all is not because the developers don't want to be sexist, but rather because there are males who like exactly that type of woman. It's different for games directed towards females, which are pretty rare, as females tend to only play puzzle-type games (again not all of course).

    It becomes most obvious when you play a dating sim that is clearly directed towards males. I will always aim for the girl that is my type the most, so what's important for me is simply, that my type is available in it. Whether or not that type is very realistic does not matter as long as being with her makes me feel happy. Maybe that I have no interest in real-life girls is actually because my type doesn't exist in reality, yet exactly that type frequently appears in almost all RPGs and Dating Sims.
    Yes it is fan service, but I don't see why fan service should be considered as bad. Of course there can be similar fan service for females, but again the difference between men and women causes that women are not so much interested in that, so that you can open a big market about it as it exists for males.
  • Severin MiraSeverin Mira News Director/Reviewer RPGamer Staff
    edited April 2011
    Rya.Reisender said:
    But that's not even the point. If the game is directed towards males, the women in it should be how the male wishes. The reason why there are strong-willed women at all is not because the developers don't want to be sexist, but rather because there are males who like exactly that type of woman. It's different for games directed towards females, which are pretty rare, as females tend to only play puzzle-type games (again not all of course).
    I have a few issues with this paragraph. For one, this assumes the games in question have been specifically directed at males in the first place, for a lot of these theres not actually been any indication that they're going out of their way to appeal to male gamers and male gamers only. Secondly, who do you regard as 'the male' anyway? There are many different and completely males out there. Thirdly, theres no way I'm letting a statement like "females tend to only play puzzle-type games" slide without requiring some link to a proper study stating that so if you please... :)
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  • OcelotOcelot is not declawed RPGamer Staff
    edited April 2011
    Spartakus said:

    I also don't see any contradiction between skimpy clothing and believable characterization. The first comes down to design, the other to writing. Of course you could argue a skimpily clad character is begging not to be taken seriously, but this is presuming the norms of the fantasy world are similar to some of our IMO more unfortunate ones. If you have a very well written character I see no reason to depreciate him/her because of clothing or physique; it's not as if an interesting personality is "validated" by being flatchested and dressed in a burqa and "devalidated" by big breasts and a miniskirt. I want characters that are both sexy and well-written.


    It's not so much the lack of or amount of clothing as the type of clothing. A long dress with a split up to the hip can be just as sexy as a small skirt. Of course, real life clothing is a different matter entirely.
    I'm going to disagree here. In a visual medium like video gaming, a character's art design is a very important part of their characterization. I'd point to the Suikoden series as one that does an excellent job of matching the way a character dresses to his/her personality, as well as one that provides a great diversity of both male and female characters. In Suikoden, women with modest and serious personalities are dressed in a modest or sober manner, while flirtatious women tend to dress less modestly... though still in a way that makes sense based on the culture that she comes from in the game. You don't see a no-nonsense army general wearing bondage gear. The stripper clothing is reserved for characters like Jeanne, an exotic, probably-not-fully-human character whose effect on men is a recurring gag throughout the series.

    Contrast this with mismatches like I'd argue that you see in Katarina, the Dungeon Siege III character that was recently announced. She's a swashbuckling, mischevious kind of character, and her outfit from the waist up conveys that pretty well. On the bottom, though, she's wearing absurdly high heels and garters. That's a mismatch with her character trope, and seems to be added just to make the character "sexy" according to somebody's arbitrary standard. It makes her less appealing to me, because now she looks like she should be on stage in a strip club instead of out shooting pistols at monsters. It actually removes the sense of sexual empowerment that you generally find in female swashbuckler characters by replacing their trademark boots (which can be plenty sexy) with strip club gear. It makes me sad, because I love nothing more than playing female swashbucklers in a game, but the way she was dressed changes her image from "sexy and badass" to "tee hee hee my name is Candi!"

    I also think that "the fantasy world has different norms" tends to be a cop-out for developers. Firstly, scantily-clad-for-no-good-reason female characters are often seen in RPG worlds in which the surrounding population isn't scantily-clad. Secondly, fantasy cultures tend to be modeled after actual human cultures, and fantasy games contain cultural markers that are used to communicate with gamers. There's a reason that some stuff from JRPGs goes over our heads... they're symbols or references familiar to Japanese gamers, but not to us. To the eyes of the typical gamer in both Eastern and Western culture, a woman waltzing around in a leather bikini (especially when all the men/other women are dressed fairly modestly) says, "I'm pretty much just here as sexual tittilation and shouldn't be taken seriously." If you don't think that's the message that gets across, go visit some boards that aren't as well-moderated as ours and see what teenage boys have to say about these characters. They don't tend to evoke any sort of respect.

    Again, there's a huge difference between creating a character who is attractive or aesthetically appealing and dressing a character with the intent purely to titillate, regardless of the personality or role that character displays in the game. I don't know of any women who have a problem with the first (although many of us would like to see more diversity in terms of what's considered attractive... I love me some curvy women, and I'd really like the chance to create more female avatars who don't have super wasp waists), but a lot of gamers have a problem with the second.
    Becky Cunningham, Staff-at-Large
    Twitter: BeckyCFreelance
  • Rya_ReisenderRya_Reisender Solipsist Snowflake Full Members
    edited April 2011
    For one, this assumes the games in question have been specifically directed at males in the first place
    Yes I'm in fact talking about these types of games. I felt like protecting them.
    I didn't say it should not be allowed to make games not directed at males. :-)
    Secondly, who do you regard as 'the male' anyway?
    Pretty much talking about myself and males that are like me.
    Thirdly, theres no way I'm letting a statement like "females tend to only play puzzle-type games" slide without requiring some link to a proper study stating that so if you please...
    I don't really know a study, but some things are just common knowledge.
    I remember that in my old gamer community our "forum girl" once participated in a survey for female gamers and complained about the options available, for example it was asked what type of game she likes most and there were only options like "card games, puzzle games, adventure games, flash games" but nothing like "shooters" or "rpgs" in the list, heh.

    I'd honestly be interested in such a study too, though!
  • OcelotOcelot is not declawed RPGamer Staff
    edited April 2011
    Rya.Reisender said:
    Of course there are always exceptions and I'm pretty sure you are one (you are playing RPGs after all), but I could create you a list of 'abilities' that apply to more than 80% to women but less than 20% to men. There is a clear difference. The way I talk with women usually is so completely different from how I talk with men. Men can't really have women as normal friends, it will always cause trouble eventually, if you try it. Too much differences. *-*;

    But that's not even the point. If the game is directed towards males, the women in it should be how the male wishes. The reason why there are strong-willed women at all is not because the developers don't want to be sexist, but rather because there are males who like exactly that type of woman. It's different for games directed towards females, which are pretty rare, as females tend to only play puzzle-type games (again not all of course).

    It becomes most obvious when you play a dating sim that is clearly directed towards males. I will always aim for the girl that is my type the most, so what's important for me is simply, that my type is available in it. Whether or not that type is very realistic does not matter as long as being with her makes me feel happy. Maybe that I have no interest in real-life girls is actually because my type doesn't exist in reality, yet exactly that type frequently appears in almost all RPGs and Dating Sims.
    Yes it is fan service, but I don't see why fan service should be considered as bad. Of course there can be similar fan service for females, but again the difference between men and women causes that women are not so much interested in that, so that you can open a big market about it as it exists for males.
    Man, this entire post is entirely debunked by modern biological and social science. Biological gender-based differences exist on a bell curve, where gender linked traits are strongly exhibited by a small percentage of the population, while the vast majority of us are in the middle and exhibit a huge mixture of traits and abilities. Culturally-determined gender expression varies greatly depending on where you are and who you hang out with, and is a fluid thing that often changes throughout a person's lifetime.

    Here are a couple of links to studies that show how complex gendered gaming preferences are:

    http://oak.cats.ohiou.edu/~jl226302/sample.pdf
    http://labweb.education.wisc.edu/steinkuehler/gls/files/hayes2.pdf
    Becky Cunningham, Staff-at-Large
    Twitter: BeckyCFreelance
  • Severin MiraSeverin Mira News Director/Reviewer RPGamer Staff
    edited April 2011
    Ok, that's makes it a bit clearer what your position actually is. I think the issue here less ofcused on those 'obvious' male gamer ones and moreon the ones that are trying to keep mass appeal.
    Rya.Reisender said:
    I don't really know a study, but some things are just common knowledge. I remember that in my old gamer community our "forum girl" once participated in a survey for female gamers and complained about the options available, for example it was asked what type of game she likes most and there were only options like "card games, puzzle games, adventure games, flash games" but nothing like "shooters" or "rpgs" in the list, heh.

    I'd honestly be interested in such a study too, though!

    Thing it's its very difficult to tell with those types of statements whether it's actual knowledge or the statements generally associated with pub talk (e.g. the "what's wrong with this country"-type ones) that may or may not have any relevance to actual facts. So yeah the studies would be nice to help indicate which way this thinking falls.

    With regards to the male/females are clearly very different thing, it's true that yes there differences between the two but also bear note of the differences within both sexes. I myself don't consider the differences between myself and another male with different interests are any smaller (and are probably much more pronounced) in cases like these than between myself and female friends who do share interests.

    clarification: written before Ocelot's post was available to me
    "My doctor says that I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fibre and that I am therefore excused from saving universes."
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  • Zaku77Zaku77 Member Full Members
    edited April 2011
    Ocelot said:
    Those of us who are sick and tired of female characters in chainmail bikinis aren't tired of them because they're "too attractive" or because we have a problem with sex or sexuality. For me, it's a problem of characterization. Female characters in ridiculously skimpy outfits tend to be placed in games primarily as sexualized objects rather than strong characters in their own right. Even if they have been given a half-decent story and a decent personality, the way they're dressed tends to undermine that personality. There are occasional characters, like Kain
    Check out my fledgling youtube channel. It's small now, but if I get more subscribers I will start doing more with it, so stay tuned!

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  • NightfoxNightfox Member Full Members
    edited April 2011
    It's amusing to me that console RPGs were started by Dragon Quest, which is one of the only game series that made males and female leads almost entirely on equal footing (barring the joke magic bikini armor, which they even present as something not to be taken seriously), and it's the most popular RPG series in Japan. Pokemon was already brought up as having the same strengths, and it's also in the top 3 series (I don't know if it's more popular than Final Fantasy, but I believe it is?). A long time ago the Ultima series also tried to do the same thing by keeping the female Avatar, who was the closest in video game history to being actually "you" story-wise, on the same level as the male. Only difference came down to who flirted with you (for the most part). Of course... U8 and U9 ditched this trait that made them unique in gaming, but that's another story.

    I just bring that up because it's interesting that the some of the strongest Japanese games are the ones that bring the most minimal attention to the issue of sexism (or at least treat both genders equally), while the ones that "cater to teenage boys" do considerably poorer.

    This topic just caught my attention because it's the main motivation behind the RPG I've been developing the last year. I really wanted to see a female lead character who was a strong fighter that wasn't pure fan service and had a more easy-going personality rather than the overly stoic or over-the-top leads we do see from time to time... and actually have them lead a group of guys instead of a primarily female cast, which seems to be the current trend. I hope it works.

    Anyways, I am guessing that anytime there isn't a player choice of gender for the main character, some consideration of sexism (vs. either gender) will probably spring up regardless of the creator's motivations.
    http://www.shadowdawngenesis.com - follow progress on the upcoming RPG series Shadowdawn on Xbox Live Indie Games and PC (and wherever else we can take it)
  • rydia of the mistrydia of the mist Member Full Members
    edited April 2011
    One thing I do find a bit weird for games, depending on what game it is, is how most have women in heels. Final Fantasy 4, Rydia and Rosa in heeled boots.. when they're suppose to be running around saving the world. Seeing stuff like that, to me, just doesn't make any sense in the sense of : armor, weapons and being prepared to go off and battle and going through caves and such. I love the game to death, after all it made me a rpg fan and then a gamer much later on, but it always seemed odd to me that they are wearing heels for battling and traveling through caves and such.
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