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Huge Developments Underway in Baltimore - Editorial

MacstormMacstorm Ysy St.Administrators
edited July 2012 in Latest Updates
The developers of Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning have undergone some big, huge changes over the past few months since their game released. While things looked down for a while, for some of them, the outlook is now much more epic.

Editorial
"The universe is already mad. Anything else would be redundant."
Twitter @FinalMacstorm

Comments

  • TG BarighmTG Barighm Member Full Members
    edited July 2012
    As an interesting aside, EA stated they would love to publish a follow-up to Kingdoms of Amalur.
  • LegendaryZoltanLegendaryZoltan Releaser of Heavy Metal Full Members
    edited July 2012
    A very important editorial. Thank you. I totally want all those guys to get new jobs but most of all, I want Curt Schilling to be able to finish his MMO someday. If Epic ends up making a new Amalur sequel with EA, is it possible that Curt gets called? I personally think that he SHOULD be there. I don't think his input in the game was a small one.

    The guy seems like such a successful person in life in general so it seems unlikely that he'd just go out like that.
  • TheAnimeManTheAnimeMan Member Full Members
    edited July 2012
    I think it was more EA wants to Produce another KoA game and not just publish it. That's the sense i got.
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  • TyphoTypho Knight Errant Full Members
    edited July 2012
    LegendaryZoltan said:
    A very important editorial. Thank you. I totally want all those guys to get new jobs but most of all, I want Curt Schilling to be able to finish his MMO someday. If Epic ends up making a new Amalur sequel with EA, is it possible that Curt gets called? I personally think that he SHOULD be there. I don't think his input in the game was a small one.

    The guy seems like such a successful person in life in general so it seems unlikely that he'd just go out like that.
    I haven't kept up with it since everything went down, but it sounded like Schilling was getting scapegoated at the time. Whether he deserves it or not who knows? I doubt he comes out of this whole thing unscathed.
  • Gideon ZhiGideon Zhi Member Full Members
    edited July 2012
    The real issue with Amalur was budgetary over-reach, an extremely unfortunate problem in the industry these days. If selling 500,000 units of _any_ game is considered a failure and your studio goes bankrupt, you're doing something very, very wrong.
  • DravDrav A Serious Man Full Members
    edited July 2012
    The should make an RPG based on The Wire. Except don't get 38 Studio to do it.
  • JitawaJitawa Member Full Members
    edited July 2012
    I liked Amalur. I mean... it was a competent game, if nothing else. I didn't feel the voicework, art, and story quite befitted the pedigree of all these famous people that were contributing to it. Perhaps that's just me. It's far from a "failure" in my mind though.
  • The DoomhammerThe Doomhammer Prod with the Prod Full Members
    edited July 2012
    The should make an RPG based on The Wire. Except don't get 38 Studio to do it.
    "PLAYER, Omar stole our package! Can you go to the projects and bring back 8 bags of Heroin before Snoop finds out and kills me in an abandoned house? I'll give you 25 dollars and a 38. revolver +2"

    I remember Chris Avellone saying a The Wire RPG was his dream project or something. I have no clue how it would work honestly.
  • DravDrav A Serious Man Full Members
    edited July 2012
    At the beginning of the game you choose to be either a dealer or police. If you choose to be a dealer, the object of the game is to either become a Kindpin or a shotgun-wielding folk hero. If you choose to be police, you get ****ed.
  • LOLOttertardLOLOttertard Member Full Members
    edited July 2012
    I'm not particularly fond of rumors in the gaming world since more often than not they lead to vaporware and disappointments. I only wish to see new games announced if developers are 99.99% sure they'll see release in the near future (*looks at Final Fantasy Versus XIII*).
  • Gideon ZhiGideon Zhi Member Full Members
    edited July 2012
    Jitawa said:
    I liked Amalur. I mean... it was a competent game, if nothing else. I didn't feel the voicework, art, and story quite befitted the pedigree of all these famous people that were contributing to it. Perhaps that's just me. It's far from a "failure" in my mind though.
    That's just it, the only possible excuse for calling it a "failure" is that it couldn't meet extreme and unreasonable sales requirements to make back its budget. Might have been one thing if it was an MMO with a monthly fee coming in, but a single-player game with a one-time buy-in? 500,000 units is damn good for a new IP!
  • OcelotOcelot is not declawed RPGamer Staff
    edited July 2012
    We don't actually know if Reckoning overran its budget. The main budgetary problems 38 was having were related to the development of the Copernicus MMO. We know Reckoning did all right for publisher EA (enough that EA was probably going to publish Reckoning 2 until it heard about the financial issues at 38), but we don't know how much money it gave back to BHG/38 Studios.
    Becky Cunningham, Staff-at-Large
    Twitter: BeckyCFreelance
  • Lodor3Lodor3 Member Full Members
    edited July 2012
    EA had a 70, them, 30, 38s, split for the console game. EA took most of the money.
  • JitawaJitawa Member Full Members
    edited July 2012
    Lodor3 said:
    EA had a 70, them, 30, 38s, split for the console game. EA took most of the money.
    Is that customary? That seems.. more lop-sided than I would've guessed.
  • PawsPaws Purr RPGamer Staff
    edited July 2012
    No it isn't, so I'm curious where the stat comes from.
  • lolwhoopslolwhoops Member HalifaxFull Members
    edited July 2012
    i can't remember where I heard it, but it said that it was 70/30 plus they had to pay back 30 million for a loan EA gave them before they could collect any profit. I can't say that it's true but I can say whoever agrees to that kind of deal pretty much shoots themselves in the head, financially speaking.
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  • PawsPaws Purr RPGamer Staff
    edited July 2012
    I could understand 70/30 + loan the other way. That makes sense.
  • lolwhoopslolwhoops Member HalifaxFull Members
    edited July 2012
    lolwhoops: a Gamer's Blog
    ^^is my blog! Updates whenever I feel like it! :D which happens a lot more often now!
    this is my twitter! come twit with me
  • PawsPaws Purr RPGamer Staff
    edited July 2012
    Hmm, that article brings up more and more questions. 2 million to break even when 3 million was said on twitter previously, etc etc.
  • OcelotOcelot is not declawed RPGamer Staff
    edited July 2012
    I'm very curious if that 70/30 split is the standard for EA Partners? Between this 38 Studios debacle and the stuff that came out of the Activision/Infinity Ward suit, we've been getting a rare inside look at the insanity that is game publishing contracts. It's no wonder independent studios are putting stuff up on Kickstarter.
    Becky Cunningham, Staff-at-Large
    Twitter: BeckyCFreelance
  • JitawaJitawa Member Full Members
    edited July 2012
    Ocelot said:
    I'm very curious if that 70/30 split is the standard for EA Partners? Between this 38 Studios debacle and the stuff that came out of the Activision/Infinity Ward suit, we've been getting a rare inside look at the insanity that is game publishing contracts. It's no wonder independent studios are putting stuff up on Kickstarter.
    No kidding. The difference in profit for a company with little leverage like Double Fine would be absurd.
  • flamethrowerflamethrower Member Full Members
    edited July 2012
    Kickstarter takes a 5% cut of all money paid. It's extremely low margin for them as they pay money transfer fees for you (such as Paypal, Google Payments, etc...).
  • LegendaryZoltanLegendaryZoltan Releaser of Heavy Metal Full Members
    edited July 2012
    It boggles me as to why the people who developed a game would get paid less than the publishers? Is there more to publishing than meets the eye?
  • OcelotOcelot is not declawed RPGamer Staff
    edited July 2012
    LegendaryZoltan said:
    It boggles me as to why the people who developed a game would get paid less than the publishers? Is there more to publishing than meets the eye?
    Well, publishers often help to fund the creation of a game. The more funding a publisher provides a developer, the bigger a chunk of the game's profits the publisher will ask for in the contract. We don't know how much funding EA gave 38 Studios for Reckoning, so we don't know if the 30/70 split is normal for EA Partners or is because 38 was hard up for money, so they asked for as much funding as EA was willing to give, and in return, EA said, "ok, but we get most of the profit."
    Becky Cunningham, Staff-at-Large
    Twitter: BeckyCFreelance
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