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Staff Review - Far Cry 3

Fowl SorcerousFowl Sorcerous Dread News EditorRPGamer Staff
edited April 2013 in Latest Updates
Did I ever tell you know the definition of insanity? It starts with RPGamer reviewing a shooter, then the reviewer declares his spirit animal to be ‘The Explosion Bear’ and then the climax gets delayed by goofing around in a wingsuit.

there was an extended oingo boigo reference planned

Comments

  • JitawaJitawa Member Full Members
    edited April 2013
    All these cross-genre things make me wonder how you really come to a RPG label sometimes. I mean, Deus Ex has conversation trees, skill trees, etc. (and the original is famous for being a fusion of shooter with other game-types), but the core gameplay has more in common with something like Metal Gear or Hitman, where you're choosing how to get to a certain objective with some method or another of which stealth or guns-blazing are the main ones. On the subject of Metal Gear, people would almost certainly consider that a stealth-focused shooter, right? But Peace Walker had more of a mission system with base building, character recruitment, and leveling/advancing various weapon types. Legend of Zelda (OG) was called an RPG by Nintendo originally, though it was way back before there was much to compare it to (Wizardry came out five years prior I guess, so maybe it was just a marketing thing). It seems like all the prototypical shooters have leveling and skill systems now too, and experience... and items. They arguably have more RPG elements than Legend of Zelda ever did. Eve Online (the MMO) has that free shooter on the PS3 coming out, and despite it being a shooter, it will have MMORPG elements and the characters have skill trees that look ridiculously complex.

    Ahh... what a mess. Far Cry 3 was a lot of fun though, though I think the writing/plot wound up being more than a little off.
  • DarkRPGMasterDarkRPGMaster A Witness to Destruction Moderators
    edited April 2013
    They choose what they choose to cover. The line between RPG and non-RPG is at the line where it's very hard to make the distinction at times...so they merely choose what they feel fits it. That is all.

    I might need to check this game out sometime, back on topic.
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  • Fowl SorcerousFowl Sorcerous Dread News Editor RPGamer Staff
    edited April 2013
    DarkRPGMaster said:
    They choose what they choose to cover. The line between RPG and non-RPG is at the line where it's very hard to make the distinction at times...so they merely choose what they feel fits it. That is all.
    there's a factor where the board of editors say 'maybe' as long as the guy who brings it up can do the bulk of the work/convince enough staffers to help. thanks team. :encouragement:
  • SlayerSlayer Member Full Members
    edited April 2013
    I am a devoted RPGamer who loved Far Cry 3.
    Thanks for your review. I enjoyed it.
  • TG BarighmTG Barighm Member Full Members
    edited April 2013
    It seems like all the prototypical shooters have leveling and skill systems now too, and experience... and items. They arguably have more RPG elements than Legend of Zelda ever did.
    I've said it before and I'll say it again: as long as people identify a game mechanic as a genre, there will be confusion.

    But that's okay. I like RPG mechanics. Actual roleplaying isn't all that much fun anyway.
  • 7thCircle7thCircle RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    edited April 2013
    What stuck with me about Far Cry 3 was just how amazing Vaas was as a character. It stood out enough that I looked online to see what the heck Ubisoft did different, and found the well documented explanations of how the talented actor was involved in creating the character's look and personality. Really makes me wonder why this doesn't happen more. Characters in video games are notoriously awful or cookie cutter. Why not let the actor get involved in this way more often if the results are so fantastic? Here's a guy in a game that has two short monologues as pretty much his only dialogue, and it was more memorable to me than anything else about the game. That's not necessarily a knock on the rest of the game; I have a bad memory for games when I marathon them in a weekend or two.
    The lesson here is that dreams inevitably lead to hideous implosions.
  • watcherwatcher Veteran RPGamer Full Members
    edited April 2013
    7th, the short answer is that it takes a lot more time than having the VA spit out lines, which means it costs more money. And there will always be those that try to avoid spending money, even if it would be money well spent.
  • JitawaJitawa Member Full Members
    edited April 2013
    watcher said:
    7th, the short answer is that it takes a lot more time than having the VA spit out lines, which means it costs more money. And there will always be those that try to avoid spending money, even if it would be money well spent.
    Skill of the actor matters too (and experience with voice-only work as well). I'm reminded of various games that had cameos of somewhat larger stars and the extent to which that "mattered". Patrick Stewart and Sean Bean in Elder Scrolls: Oblivion for example don't add much to the game and I don't know that I would look back at their work there as memorable. Contrast that with the voice-work in something like Legacy of Kain:Soul Reaver, where they got Michael Bell and Tony Jay (Jay has a particular ridiculous resume). They're less recognizable than the Stewart or Bean, but they did a far better job of inhabiting and establishing character for the roles they played.

    Not that a recognized name can't do a good job either, David Warner was great in Baldur's Gate 2. I think experienced actors from animation tend to work better though (Richard Steven Horvitz in Psychonauts, et al.)
  • hyperknees91hyperknees91 Member Full Members
    edited April 2013
    Should review Resident Evil 4 someday, that game has more rpg elements than some rpgs I've played hah.
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