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Round 2, Match 21: Bravely Default - Winner (3) vs. Breath of Fire D Q (2)

JuMeSynJuMeSyn Code: KirinAdministrators
edited June 2014 in Battle Royale!
Match 21: Which battle system do you prefer?
Bravely Default
Breath of Fire Dragon Quarter

This one begins 2 or 3 minutes after midnight on Friday morning for easterners. It will end... Monday morning, and then our slugfest will take a week off for E3.

Ken, Becky, Phil, and Glenn are the debaters this time. Whenever they're ready, things will start happening!

We ended this one sometime Monday morning as the flood of E3 news started to intrude. Since the next round won't be starting for a few more days, precision is less vital this time around.
It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
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Comments

  • WheelsWheels RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    edited June 2014
    You know the right thing to do gang

    Breath_of_Fire_-_Dragon_Quarter_Coverart.png
    Ask Wheels- This Week's Episode
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  • PawsPaws Purr RPGamer Staff
    edited June 2014
    You're not gonna close it in two days and just have a week of rest?
  • TwinBahamutTwinBahamut Staff Healer RPGamer Staff
    edited June 2014
    Umm... Go Dragon Quarter, I guess? I'll cheer on that underdog. :)
  • watcherwatcher Veteran RPGamer Full Members
    edited June 2014
    Well, I'm voting for Dragon Quarter.
  • Rya_ReisenderRya_Reisender Solipsist Snowflake Full Members
    edited June 2014
    I don't think that either have a really notable battle system, but I just hate Dragon Quarter too much, so I'll vote for Bravely Default out of spite.

    I also think you should close at least the reader's poll after 2 days or else there will be too many multi-voters.
  • DarkRPGMasterDarkRPGMaster A Witness to Destruction Moderators
    edited June 2014
    I have to vote Dragon Quarter. You all know how much I praise it's innovation of the genre. Bravely Default, I sadly have not played yet (BLASPHEMY I know), but from what I've seen it too is unique...but sadly not enough to get my vote.
    "Yes, because apparently blindly jumping headfirst into a firefight without a grasp on the situation or any combat experience is a sign of genius these days."
  • WheelsWheels RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    edited June 2014
    Love the Dragon Quarter love. You know my thoughts on this game and its wonderful battle system.

    stone-cold-stunners-booker-t-o.gif
    I don't think that either have a really notable battle system, but I just hate Dragon Quarter too much, so I'll vote for Bravely Default out of spite.


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    Ask Wheels- This Week's Episode
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  • Zeboyd GamesZeboyd Games Member Full Members
    edited June 2014
    I've sung Dragon Quarter's praises in an early matchup so I won't repeat myself there.

    Bravely Default's system is interesting & quite fun, but it has a pretty huge balancing problem. Specifically, since you can go into BP debt, the ideal move to make in the vast majority of random encounters is to brave 4 times on every character (or on 3 characters if you want to be safe & leave somebody to clean up any problems if something goes wrong) and just finish things on the 1st turn, quite possibly before the enemy even has a chance to move (if your character's speed is high enough). However, in boss encounters, the brave system works much better.
    Check out upcoming RPG, Cosmic Star Heroine, at http://cosmicstarheroine.com/
  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited June 2014
    Wheels wrote: »
    You know the right thing to do gang

    Breath_of_Fire_-_Dragon_Quarter_Coverart.png

    Well...um...Ok! I should clearly vote for DQ because it totally has the most awesomest box art evah!!!
  • Zeboyd GamesZeboyd Games Member Full Members
    edited June 2014
    Breath of Fire: Dragon Quarter also has the most awesomest intro evah!!!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XtBgCuRlZb8

    Not that this matters in a battle system competition. But you should still vote for Dragon Quarter anyway. :)
    Check out upcoming RPG, Cosmic Star Heroine, at http://cosmicstarheroine.com/
  • MacstormMacstorm Ysy St. Administrators
    edited June 2014
    Dragon Quarter is one of those games I really wish would get remade on a portable so that I could play it. I didn't get it at release because I wasn't a Breath of Fire fan, so I ignored it, only to find out later how interesting the battle system actually sounded. That said, I couldn't just drop a default vote on Bravely Default just because it's the only one I've played. The battle system does have some interesting features to it, especially when you factor in all the job skills you can get, but I can't help but feel that the brave/default aspect is the ONLY thing it has that makes the battle system interesting. Like was already said, most random encounters are easy enough to handle on auto with everyone braving. It just didn't keep my interest outside of boss battles, so I can't say it's getting my backing. I'd support Dragon Quarter just because of how interesting it sounds.
    "The universe is already mad. Anything else would be redundant."
    Twitter @FinalMacstorm
  • TexsideTexside Member Full Members
    edited June 2014
    Macstorm wrote: »
    Dragon Quarter is one of those games I really wish would get remade on a portable so that I could play it. I didn't get it at release because I wasn't a Breath of Fire fan, so I ignored it, only to find out later how interesting the battle system actually sounded. That said, I couldn't just drop a default vote on Bravely Default just because it's the only one I've played. The battle system does have some interesting features to it, especially when you factor in all the job skills you can get, but I can't help but feel that the brave/default aspect is the ONLY thing it has that makes the battle system interesting. Like was already said, most random encounters are easy enough to handle on auto with everyone braving. It just didn't keep my interest outside of boss battles, so I can't say it's getting my backing. I'd support Dragon Quarter just because of how interesting it sounds.

    Same boat here. A friend told me not to get it back in the day and I foolishly listened; in retrospect, he didn't understand how dying is a crucial part of the game, and he thought it wasn't playing fair. Sigh!

    That said, Bravely Default's system is basically amazing. I can't really pick one here, having never played Dragon Quarter... but I wish I had.
  • OcelotOcelot is not declawed RPGamer Staff
    edited June 2014
    I liked aspects of Dragon Quarter's battle system, but I didn't find it memorable enough to ring down through the years in my memory like Grandia II's system has. Leaning heavily towards Bravely Default unless people can convince me exactly why DQ's battles were so great. Don't bother telling me how Bravely Default's system sucked, because I'm not going to agree on that. :)
    Becky Cunningham, Staff-at-Large
    Twitter: BeckyCFreelance
  • CofLSilkCofLSilk RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    edited June 2014
    I already talked about DQ in its first matchup. In short, it had a great system with a lot of strategy and real consequences for overusing dragon abilities.

    Bravely Default is an interesting case. The battle system gimmicks were fun, but they were little more than being able to use up to 4 turns at a time. While this lead to wide range of strategy choices, it really just made trash battles end faster. In the endgame, a reckless 4x brave strategy could easily mean certain defeat. The most interesting part of BD's system was the way jobs and abilities could be mixed and matched. While this was an interesting system, it mostly ended up with me picking the strongest damage class I could until I was able make completely broken combos that made even difficult battles a joke. In my last few boss battles, I didn't even utilize the brave system at all...all I had to do was use 1 ability each turn. It was effective, but totally broken.

    I think the love of BD comes from striking a chord with old school RPG nostalgia. I often saw people describe it as the Final Fantasy they had been waiting for, and it certainly was a love letter to classic JRPG fans. If this was an overall enjoyment battle, I might have given my vote to BD. It's battle system, however, can't compare to Dragon Quarter.

    Winner: Dragon Quarter
  • WheelsWheels RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    edited June 2014
    You hit the nail on the head, what makes Dragon Quarter's combat work, apart from being exceptionally well put together tactical combat, is the danger of real consequences.

    Failure in Dragon Quarter is not a simple WELP BACK TO THE PREVIOUS SAVE, or LET ME HIT THE HOLD RESTART BATTLE BUTTON. Nope, try the back to the start folks, do not collect go, do not collect $200 (OK you kind of collect $200 because you keep experience and stuff). But what does this mean for each battle? Tactics matter and weighing risk and rewards becomes very import, one of which is the Dragon Abilities. Pretty much any battle will be cakewalk with this. Obviously overuse means game over so figuring out when to use them, or when it's worth it to use them becomes very important. And also obviously you have to be careful to not walk into a situation where you'll be destroyed before you can even use said super abilities.

    Dragon Quarter is just the bees knees.

    The cats pajamas if you will.
    Ask Wheels- This Week's Episode
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  • Zeboyd GamesZeboyd Games Member Full Members
    edited June 2014
    Actually, if you die, you CAN just go back to the last save, you don't have to start the whole game over.
    Check out upcoming RPG, Cosmic Star Heroine, at http://cosmicstarheroine.com/
  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited June 2014
    Ocelot wrote: »
    I liked aspects of Dragon Quarter's battle system, but I didn't find it memorable enough to ring down through the years in my memory like Grandia II's system has. Leaning heavily towards Bravely Default unless people can convince me exactly why DQ's battles were so great. Don't bother telling me how Bravely Default's system sucked, because I'm not going to agree on that. :)

    Ocelot... would you be able to explain to someone like me why BD is, as Wheels puts it, the "Bees Knees"? Personally, I think it's good...but I think I need convincing as to why it's great. If I was convinced of that, I may throw my vote in the BD direction. Help me out on that.. because right now, I'm not seeing a lot of supporting arguments for it over BoF DQ. (And, to clarify, I'm not asking you to compare and contrast the two, though you're more than welcome to do so...I just want to know why you support BD.) And did I mention that the cover on DQ is better? It is. More action. Pops out at you. And, you know, that's totally relevant, hahahaah.

    Actually, if you die, you CAN just go back to the last save, you don't have to start the whole game over.
    True...but I do remember saves being limited and kinda far between... so even if I wanted to reset, I would lose some valuable time if nothing else. Thankfully, that's not a combat system. Like Mac, I've never been a fan of the whole, "You died, so you lose X mins/hours by reloading your last save file" mechanic so proliferate in RPGs.
  • CofLSilkCofLSilk RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    edited June 2014
    Actually, if you die, you CAN just go back to the last save, you don't have to start the whole game over.

    Only if you made a permanent save and weren't just using suspend saves for a better final evaluation score.
  • TexsideTexside Member Full Members
    edited June 2014
    JCServant wrote: »
    Ocelot... would you be able to explain to someone like me why BD is, as Wheels puts it, the "Bees Knees"? Personally, I think it's good...but I think I need convincing as to why it's great. If I was convinced of that, I may throw my vote in the BD direction. Help me out on that.. because right now, I'm not seeing a lot of supporting arguments for it over BoF DQ. (And, to clarify, I'm not asking you to compare and contrast the two, though you're more than welcome to do so...I just want to know why you support BD.) And did I mention that the cover on DQ is better? It is. More action. Pops out at you. And, you know, that's totally relevant, hahahaah.

    Clearly, my forum handle is not Ocelot, but I'll try taking a stab at explaining why BD's battle system is great. I don't really have a horse in this race; while I like BD's battle system a lot, I've never played BoF DQ and it sounds like a fantastic game that may well beat Bravely Default. So, in no way am I saying that Bravely Default deserves to win.

    But it has a great battle system. I'll say this on three criteria: tactical depth, character development depth, and overall strategic depth.

    The game's systems force you to think in battles, which gets into the first of those criteria. Now, of course, there are battles where you will default three times, and then just smack everything and kill it in one round. This is not, however, every random fight you encounter and is certainly not every boss fight. The default system -- letting you defend and take much less damage, and gain an extra action on another turn -- applies to your party and the enemy. A critical part of the game is figuring out what the enemy can and will do, and tactically using default to minimize damage and bring the maximum level of pain to the enemy when they're not defaulting -- or when they've used brave one too many times, and they don't have any turn to act on.

    This combines with the various aspects of turn-based JRPGs that we expect: status effects and the curation thereof, elemental weaknesses, and the like. However, building up actions and using them forces you to think about these things more. You have to decide if you can afford to spend actions healing status conditions, healing yourself, or doing damage. If the enemy just attacked three times, you may need to dip in and heal more -- and you may have to decide to let that Poison or Silence sit, or to give up some damage-dealing to have a character use an item.

    But the tactical depth excels, in my humble opinion, because this system means what are mere annoyances or insta-wins in other games become another critical tactical challenge. In Bravely Default, if the enemy strikes first or has an extra BP in the first round, it hurts. You're thinking differently; you're creating a strategy to deal with it, keep yourself healed, and get them down. But when you strike first or have extra BP? The experience, JP, and money rewards for killing enemies quickly and efficiently enter the picture. Suddenly, going first means you can decide whether it's worth risking four turns of an enemy smacking you around to get those bonuses. You're seeing what's the way to do the most damage possible.

    Now, I concede this changes later in the game. Certain jobs detract from this. I feel it necessary to say so up front. But, boss battles remain tactically complex.

    For my second point, character development, I point to the robust job system. You're working to build characters who maximize utility with each other; you're finding combinations like Swordmaster and Ninja, where the Ninja makes everyone attack the Swordmaster, who has brutal combo attack abilities -- and making sure the Swordmaster has the buffs to survive. You're matching elemental spells on your weapons with abilities to take advantage of weaknesses. You're not just making your characters awesome; you're making your team awesome, and using jobs that work together in fascinating ways that make the battles work, and find ways to respond to enemies with a nasty and neat bag of tricks.

    And then we get to the strategic depth, by which I mean your choice of jobs and abilities over the course of the game should be considered. You have a lot of abilities to get, and while numerous internet friends helps, you're looking at how to get a good range of equipment and job abilities. So over the course of the game, you're considering how to clear battles efficiently and get those resources; you're taking jobs that don't have as much utility in a battle for abilities like extra JP, extra money, et cetera. This changes as more jobs open.

    And turning off random battles? That adds to it. You're debating between those extra XP, JP, and money... and making sure you're in top form for the boss. Suddenly, how you approach a dungeon has a strategic element: you're debating between fighting the necessary battles and having the resources you need (because MP is as precious as water in the desert!) for those boss battles. Using strategy matters in Bravely Default.

    And all of that, I think, is why it's a great battle system.
  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited June 2014
    Nice write up, Tex! Now, if only your name was Ocelot, I could actually consider that point of view! LOL! Just kiddin'! :)

    Whoa...I have a week think about this? Wow!
  • Strawberry EggsStrawberry Eggs Hands off the parfait! Administrators
    edited June 2014
    I can't properly pick since I've only played Bravely Default (and still playing it). I am loving BD's battle system, though. I would be more specific as to why, but Texside said everything I would have said anyway, heh.
    Bravely second...
    The courage to try again...

    Twitter: BerryEggs

  • TexsideTexside Member Full Members
    edited June 2014
    JCServant wrote: »
    Nice write up, Tex! Now, if only your name was Ocelot, I could actually consider that point of view! LOL! Just kiddin'! :)

    Whoa...I have a week think about this? Wow!

    If it helps, you might say I gave you...

    8D

    ...ocelot to think about.
  • MacstormMacstorm Ysy St. Administrators
    edited June 2014
    JCServant wrote: »
    Nice write up, Tex! Now, if only your name was Ocelot, I could actually consider that point of view! LOL! Just kiddin'! :)

    Whoa...I have a week think about this? Wow!
    Nope, just until Sunday at the normal time. After that we're just taking a week break for E3.
    "The universe is already mad. Anything else would be redundant."
    Twitter @FinalMacstorm
  • hyperknees91hyperknees91 Member Full Members
    edited June 2014
    Gotta love me some Dragon Quarter. I feel like it's one of the most wonderfully designed games I've ever played.

    It's too bad it even has the breath of fire label on it because people don't even give it a chance because of it. But like I said before, Dragon Quarter is essentially the Dark Souls of Turn based JRPGS. It's not especially difficult as long as you know what your doing, but you make mistakes and your going downnnnn.
  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited June 2014
    Allrighty...well, since I don't have all week, I better knock this out now.

    I've raved about both of these games on RPGBacktrack because I love both of them. None of my critiquing below should ever be construed as anything short of that. But when comparing two great battle systems, everything, including the smallest of wrinkles, must be taken into account.

    I find this contest interesting because of what these games have in common. They both bucked a trend or two of their time. When Breath of Fire : Dragon Quarter (BofDQ) came out, the PS2 had a number of great, traditional JRPGs. Free-form tactical (as opposed to grid based) RPGs were a lot less common in that day. It not only bucked the trend of PS2 RPGs of the time, but also other the previous games in its series. Those differences polarized its audience... with some applauding it's fresh approach, while others bemoaned that it departed so far away from what made the series so beloved.

    Bravely Default (BD) bucks trends as well, but by returning to form. SquareEnix had been getting further and further away from traditional JRPG form with each game it releases in its venerable Final Fantasy franchise, which rubbed many of *its* fans the wrong way. IMHO, this should have been no surprise... the Final Fantasy series is characterized by an ever evolving battle system. Regardless, even I bemoaned as I watched trailers of the upcoming Final Fantasy XV, which looks more like an action game and any traditional JRPG combat system. So, when Bravely Default came out with a traditional approach, many praised Square for returning to form.

    Looking specifically at these battle systems, I'm a bit torn. I feel they both do some things right, and some both have some misses. Here's my take...which is super subjective.

    Bravely Default's combat is traditional JRPG with one big difference...the Brave/Default system which allows you to defend and save up extra turns. At first, this seems to add an appreciated layer of depth...but in the long run, I became irritated a bit by it. I appreciated that it let me breeze through random battles by just going all out. But, eventually, it gets boring. The problem, for me, ends up highlighting a basic problem with some JRPGs in general...poor pacing and balance with random encounters. No one likes being attacked every three steps. And no one likes when random battles are constantly too hard or too easy. Add on there that traditional JRPG battle system format is simple to begin with, and you have a receipe for mind numbing boredom. Before I get ousted as hating all traditional JRPG battle systems, keep in mind, I think Dragon Quest series are the bee's knees. I love the difficulty balance and the random encounter rates come close to my own personal preference.

    BD addresses these issues with it's Brave system (by allowing you to just blast through most random encounters) and random encounter slider. I won't focus on the slider...but in the end, these, for me, felt more like band aids rather than addressing the issue. Random battles quickly became boring... so I turned on all auto / fast battles and watched my little guys go to work. It reminds me of the SNES Tactics Ogre... you know that developers themselves believe that their battle system is a bit too boring when they include options for it to play itself (LOL).

    Its not all bad, of course.... I did have fun overall. When it came to boss battles, the system feels a bit more satisfactory. Strategic use of Braves and Defaults make a real difference between winning and losing. As fun as that subsystem is, BD sports as deep as a turn based JRPG system as any of its predecessors. Multiple jobs and abilities insure that you always have new combos to try. Combine that with numerous spells and you can get as deep as you want coming up with super powerful combat strategies allowing to take on some equally powerful optional bosses.

    Breath of Fire: Dragon Quarter gives you freedom of movement with its tactical system. I'm always a huge fan that allows me to move characters around on a battlefield. It's an easy way to add tactical complexity to just about any battle system. Moving around to line up spells while trying to insure that my own party isn't all bunched up for an enemy fire breath is also fun. The Action Point (AP) system adds to the depth. Suddenly, I have to consider the opportunity cost of everything I do. Similar to the brave system, using your AP wisely leads to victory. Being able to add skills to equipment mixes things up even further. While DQBoF doesn't have the sheer number of skills/spells that BD has, the tactical element with the AP systems makes the whole thing feel a lot deeper than it probably is.

    One of the things I love about BoFDQ, which you don't hear about enough (though you hear about it ANY time you talk about Chrono Trigger) is that you can see the enemies walking around. THere are no random encounters here. Now, some of you may not think that this would be considered a combat system (or element, par se)... but unlike Chrono Trigger, where enemies quickly position themselves once combat starts, the mobs in BoFDQ start combat where you see them. This means that how you approach them before combat starts is important. And you have to use the right trap against the right enemies. Do the right thing, and you can earn yourself a huge advantage for combat before it initiates. When combat starts, it happens right there in the environment. You will not see a breaking away of the screen or anything. This goes a long way to increasing immersion in the game. I'm surprised this doesn't get more praise, given how we generally gush over Chrono Trigger's non-random encounter system... and at the end of the day, DQ:BOF's additions to it make this beloved combat system element even better!

    Another point of contrast with the battle system is how BoFDQ feels like a survival game, and the other doesn't. In BoFDQ, items are super powerful in that they don't have an opportunity cost, really. However, they're also pretty limited. You also have your dragon powers, which come at the dreadful cost of your humanity. By contrast, the only limitation of resources I felt in BD was those bloody expensive elixirs. DANG. Those are NOT a cheap date. Now, normally I'm a fan of limited resources...it adds a layer of strategy if I can't just spam abilities, items, etc., in every fight. So, I'd be OK with the limited / expensive elixirs essentially forcing me to ration my MPs...EXCEPT I never worried about it. Why? Because when I ran low, I turned off random encounters, LOL. Another issue with the whole elixir thing (and I had this issue in FF4, for example) is that it just seems to punish spellcasters verses most other classes. I can spam martial abilities until the cows come home...but not magic ones because of that MP limitation. So, that very much encourages me to have mostly physical parties...which discourages diversity, IMHO. Ultimately, this wasn't a huge deal to me thanks to the ability to adjust random encounter rates on the fly.

    Hmmmm...as I go back and forth on these...I enjoy them both despite their few shortcomings. Ultimately, its a near tie for me, so I'm totally going with Box Art as the deciding factor.

    Ok...I didn't really pick it on box art. Ultimately, I feel that while it may not be as deep, and wears out its welcome in less hours than BD, BoFDQ is a more fun combat experience (for me) while it lasts. Its no secret that I'm a huge fan of tactical style combat systems and that I'm not a huge fan of traditional JPRG turn based combats unless they are super well balanced and/or do something original. BD is original enough with its Brave/Default and deep job system which allows multiple cross class abilities to be equipped...multiplying your combat options more than nearly any traditional JRPG before it. (and coming off of playing FFV, it feels SOOO awesome to be able to equip *multiple* abilities). But, if I'm on limited free time (and I am), BoFDQ offers a more compelling combat system IMHO thanks, in part, to how it keeps me immersed in the RPG experience itself. With limited items/resources and combat that takes place in the environment itself (that I can even lay/throw traps in), and a combat mechanic tied into my main character's humanity (of all things), this one just barely edges out the current gen's handheld king of traditional JRPG combat.

    Vote - Breath of Fire: Dragon Quarter
  • OcelotOcelot is not declawed RPGamer Staff
    edited June 2014
    Ha ha, I was busy playing WildStar, but Texside did an excellent job on my behalf!

    Thanks for the extra input on Dragon Quarter. I now understand that many of the things people enjoyed best about it aren't things that particularly make me love a battle system. It's a bit hard for me to separate DQ's battle system from the rest of the game because the entire experience of playing was stressful for me. I have (actual, clinically diagnosed) anxiety, and while gaming is usually a great escape for me, one of the few things in gaming that acts as an anxiety trigger is a particular kind of time limit. Dragon Quarter hit my anxiety buttons AND my impatience buttons, making things (including those in the combat system) that are pros for others into definite cons for me. I did like the trapping mechanic, though.

    I'll go ahead and cast my official vote: Bravely Default.

    For the reasons Texside gave, and the reasons I gave during its first vote. :)

    Edit: What have I done? I just gave a deciding vote to Glenn! <3
    Becky Cunningham, Staff-at-Large
    Twitter: BeckyCFreelance
  • PimpaliciousPimpalicious Member Full Members
    edited June 2014
    I don't think I have anything to say not said about it already, voting Dragon Quarter.
  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited June 2014
    Ocelot wrote: »
    ...one of the few things in gaming that acts as an anxiety trigger is a particular kind of time limit. Dragon Quarter hit my anxiety buttons AND my impatience buttons, making things (including those in the combat system) that are pros for others into definite cons for me.

    I will clarify for the benefit of the few who do not know... yeah, the game has a built in time mechanic. As I mentioned above, you have dragon abilities which, when used, cause you to lose part of your humanity (a counter inches up towards 100%). Once it tops out, game over. And, if you don't use your dragon powers at all (and you WILL be tempted many times), it still goes up... every time you take a step.

    This would normally be a huge turn off. Like Ocelot, I don't like RPGs with time limits. For me, it's actually a negative in Persona 3/4 (even though its quite liberal) and don't even get me started on FF13: Lightning Returns. However, in BoFDQ, you are encouraged through a number of systems to start the game over. Yeah, you heard me right... start over. When you do, you open up new story line, and if you plan properly, can carry things forward. So, you'll get stonger, faster, and know more about what's going on. Think of it similar to the reincarnation system in Disgaea, except you actually open up new story line stuff as you do so :) Even with this mechanic in place, the game does not take long to beat. Someone who knows what they're doing can do it under 10 hours. Those of us not using FAQs and the such will take about twice that :p
  • CyberSkullCyberSkull Member Full Members
    edited June 2014
    I love Bravely Default, but Dragon Quarter has some real innovation in the battle system I just haven't seen in anything since.
    Sincerely,
    Your Dread Lord
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    Un-Certified Looney, Heretic @ Large, etc…
  • TexsideTexside Member Full Members
    edited June 2014
    Ocelot wrote: »
    Ha ha, I was busy playing WildStar, but Texside did an excellent job on my behalf!

    Thanks for the extra input on Dragon Quarter. I now understand that many of the things people enjoyed best about it aren't things that particularly make me love a battle system. It's a bit hard for me to separate DQ's battle system from the rest of the game because the entire experience of playing was stressful for me. I have (actual, clinically diagnosed) anxiety, and while gaming is usually a great escape for me, one of the few things in gaming that acts as an anxiety trigger is a particular kind of time limit. Dragon Quarter hit my anxiety buttons AND my impatience buttons, making things (including those in the combat system) that are pros for others into definite cons for me. I did like the trapping mechanic, though.

    I'll go ahead and cast my official vote: Bravely Default.

    For the reasons Texside gave, and the reasons I gave during its first vote. :)

    Edit: What have I done? I just gave a deciding vote to Glenn! <3

    Glad to help! I can definitely see what you mean, too. There is absolutely a personal aspect to whether a battle system is fun (which is why we have multiple judges, oh ho ho).
    JCServant wrote: »
    I will clarify for the benefit of the few who do not know... yeah, the game has a built in time mechanic. As I mentioned above, you have dragon abilities which, when used, cause you to lose part of your humanity (a counter inches up towards 100%). Once it tops out, game over. And, if you don't use your dragon powers at all (and you WILL be tempted many times), it still goes up... every time you take a step.

    This would normally be a huge turn off. Like Ocelot, I don't like RPGs with time limits. For me, it's actually a negative in Persona 3/4 (even though its quite liberal) and don't even get me started on FF13: Lightning Returns. However, in BoFDQ, you are encouraged through a number of systems to start the game over. Yeah, you heard me right... start over. When you do, you open up new story line, and if you plan properly, can carry things forward. So, you'll get stonger, faster, and know more about what's going on. Think of it similar to the reincarnation system in Disgaea, except you actually open up new story line stuff as you do so :) Even with this mechanic in place, the game does not take long to beat. Someone who knows what they're doing can do it under 10 hours. Those of us not using FAQs and the such will take about twice that :p

    This part did sound interesting! It would rub my "must keep everyone alive" senses the wrong way, but possibly in a good way. The game is definitely going on my backlog.
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