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RPG Trek

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  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited September 2014
    I know, right? Seems I started doing them around DW2 a few pages back. As my proficiency with our finicky forums increased, I got more fancy in journaling these fantastic fantasies of the warriors of dragon! With that said, I still cannot do postings as fast as my own blog (or do my trademark funny captions on the screenshots), so that's the place to go if you want to FULL RPGTrek journal experience :) For your convenience, I post a direct link on the bottom of each entry here on the thread.

    Hmmm...since I'm officially into DW4 now, it must be time to change my avatar again!

    One of the things I do when I start a new game in my RPGTrek is I download a lot of the promo art, box covers, instruction manuals, etc. I'll start sharing some of those here from time to time. To get the ball rollin', here's one for Dragon Quest IV.

    dragon-quest-4-wp-07-09-08-small.jpg
    Co-Host on RPGBacktrack. Follow me on Twitter and sub to my blog if you would like!
  • AncientRuneAncientRune Member Full Members
    edited September 2014
    ah it seems most of the pics only show up when logged in that why i never saw them as i was lurking while reading them
  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2014
    59 Phoenix.jpgJOURNEY OF A UTAHAN POLYGAMEIST

    DRAGON WARRIOR III – PART 7


    With our new sword, we approached the volcano where others purported our father died. We carved a path through it, and the lava poured into a nearby river, making a new way for us to travel. Eventually, we came upon a cavernous passage leading to a shrine on the other side. After a trek through a treacherous labyrinth, we entered a holy site giving us our final orb. We brought it back to another temple where we placed our six orbs around an egg. Using their power as some magical version of a microwave, we warmed up the egg and it hatched into a flying phoenix. We hopped on its back (it’s a really BIG bird to handle Winston after he ate all of our field rations), and we flew to the final castle.


    Monsters roamed freely and traps awaited us quietly in this impressive castle. How the two interacted all these years, waiting for us, I will never know. We took note of the atypical layout of the grounds, which contrasted sharply with other dungeons and castles we explored earlier. Doing our best to conserve our energies, we made it to the demon in charge. His name started with a B. He really did not live long enough for us to bother looking at the rest of his name. With that, we headed back to the first town, our adventure over… or so we thought. During our coronation ceremony, the skies clouded up. Lightning cracked down and fried the soldiers surrounding us. Mental note: When dark skies quickly form overhead, you do NOT want to stand around wearing full plate armor while holding a metallic trumpet to your wet lips. Your life expectancy drops dramatically if you insist to persist in such activity.


    71 Final Approach.jpgA voice boomed as a different demon spoke with a disembodied voice, warning us of his plan to cover all in darkness. Why must bad guys always monologue their plans well in advance? Do they not know that the element of surprise swings in their favor if they just keep their piehole shut? Speaking of holes, my party knew exactly what to do. Earlier, we discovered a mysterious pit leading deep into the earth. We headed there, and dived right in, following the adventurers’ mantra, “Dive First, Ask Questions Later.”


    After we landed on solid ground (without breaking our bones, remarkably), we found a boy nearby who offered us his father’s ship. Nifty! Some people will just give away very luxury items to the first group of heroes they see. Using it to sail around, we realized that we landed not in some under-ground cavern, but on another world entirely. Later, when I found a map, I recognized the land as the world from the first Dragon Warrior game. Amazing! Now under a cover of perpetual darkness, and many years before Dragon Warrior I, I felt excited as I got to revisit many old towns and landmarks over again. In fact, I found a number of the magic items in the same location as before.


    80 End 2.jpgExploring the entire land and attempting to figure what we needed to do next proved daunting, however. Clearly, only an adventurer with the patience of Gandhi himself would work their way through these challenges without succumbing to the temptation to throw the controller or cast the forbidden, magic spell FAQ. I chose the latter on more than one occasion to eventually work my way to the true master pulling the strings….another demonic boss who’s name we quickly forgot.


    This guy had not one, but 3 sub-bosses guarding his throne. We had to beat them all, without resting, in a style not unlike MegaMan’s boss rush modes found at the end of most of the games in that series. Using a wizard ring to replenish our magical reserves, we took on the final head honcho, learning, quickly, the importance of earning quite a few levels ahead of time. Eventually, he fell before our heroic might. In his death, this new world found light once again, bringing hope to the people. However, we found ourselves now trapped in this strange, new world. We eventually had to acknowledge the fact that we would never return to our homeland. We all settled down, began new lives and families, and helped guide the people into the future.


    And I love the final screen…. Awesome (See Left). See more pics and more humorous comments about DW3 on my blog.


    Next: Dragon Warrior IV
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  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2014
    I'm still workin' on that review of DWIII, but in the mean time, I'm diving completely into Dragon Quest IV. I'm already 15 hours in (Did I mention I love handheld gaming? I can really get more time in when I can play a game on the go).

    As I allude to, above, I completely jump into the experience of the game. I spend time lookin' for artwork, music, and even commercials. The idea is to completely immerse myself into the experience. That's what the RPGTrek is all about! Anyway, I found a couple of clips that I never saw before. And, boy, they are cute. Enjoy!
    Co-Host on RPGBacktrack. Follow me on Twitter and sub to my blog if you would like!
  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2014
    And #2
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  • OmbresOmbres Games horder Full Members
    edited October 2014
    Those commercial are funny! Thanks for sharing them with us!
    Always enjoy all the experience in life, you might gain a level or two.
    sig.gif
  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2014
    I know...right? I'm totally getting into this! Reading the literature, changing my wallpaper, watching the commercials...and I've even gone as far as to change the ring tone on my phone... really helps to pull me into the experience. Its awesome.

    This is my new ring tone, by the way. I love this song.

    Here's some more pics. Some official...some not.

    I remember this box well.....
    Dragon_Quest_IV_cover.jpg


    dragon_quest_iv_scan_1.jpgThe Team.jpgart1.jpg
    Co-Host on RPGBacktrack. Follow me on Twitter and sub to my blog if you would like!
  • OmbresOmbres Games horder Full Members
    edited October 2014
    yes that the best version, on the nes, on the final chapter you could not control anyone beside your hero! bad!!
    Always enjoy all the experience in life, you might gain a level or two.
    sig.gif
  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2014
    I know, right?? I can't believe I beat that game with that arm tied behind my back!! ROFL. When the remake came out, that was the first thing I check for...and I was SOOO excited the changed it to a more standard control method. I'm happy that the option is still there...it's great for mindless grinding. But, honestly, I find myself using manual control WAY more often than not.
    Co-Host on RPGBacktrack. Follow me on Twitter and sub to my blog if you would like!
  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2014
    Dragon_Warrior_III box.jpg
    JOURNEY OF A UTAHAN POLYGAMEIST

    EPIC Review: Dragon Warrior III

    This prequel wraps up the original Dragon Warrior trilogy in epic fashion. From the humble beginnings of a long warrior out to save a land tyrannized by an evil overlord, we wrap this first series with a forty hou story of four heroes out to… save a land tyrannized by an evil overlord. But, don’t let the similarities fool you! Dragon Warrior III brings a host of changes and improvements to the Dragon Warrior formula. We have completed our epic quest, and a full review is ready for your reading pleasure! Grab some popcorn and a coke, buckle down and get comfy. Your next RPGTrek review is only a click away!

    Released in North America on June 12, 1991, Dragon Warrior III promised the most advanced RPG ever, boasting a huge world, multiple classes and an RPG experience like no other. And, it delivered on most of those promises if you limit its competition set to other NES games of the time. However, Dragon Warrior III also has a few elements not advertised on the box which may throw some modern RPGamers for a loop. Join me as I parse my thoughts on this epic adventure and ask myself the question, “Is it still fun today?”

    Your adventure starts with a lone hero who has a disturbing dream. After you wake, the king gives you a command to go out and save the world from a rising evil. I must confess, I glossed over the details after the plot went down the generic ‘save the world’ set up. I quickly found my way to heart of the adventurers’ guild, a new addition to the Dragon Warrior series, where I could create my own party, choosing from eight classes.

    boxback.jpgThe game advertises that you can not only choose from many classes, but change them later on. While this is true, the instructions do not do the best job informing you exactly how the process works and its implications on your characters’ growth. As a result, a player can unknowingly make some rather poor decisions that essentially weaken their character over the long run. Reading a FAQ about how the class growth process works, in detail, can alleviate this particular concern.

    Dozens of towns, dungeons and towers await. The sheer scope of this world and the variety in the themes and designs of each location simply amazes. Unlike previous games in the series, where every dungeon and town felt fairly similar, Dragon Warrior III delights in changing things up nearly every time. One minute your party excavates a cave filled with lava creatures, the next you head over to a pyramid designed symmetrically and littered with deadly traps. People grieve as they are forced to sacrifice their children in one Asian themed town. In the next, you meet an old man asking you to lend him the assistance of a merchant party member to begin building from the ground up. Every time we entered a new location, we simply had no idea what to expect.

    Fairly early in the game, the party gains a boat, allowing them to travel to the vast majority of these locations, giving the game an open ended feel. Similar to previous games, this can satisfy or frustrate the player. Most players can certainly have fun simply sailing around, mapping new areas, and knocking out smaller side quests and goals as discovered. Eventually, however, the player will need to focus on the single, main quest to progress to new areas, which requires certain magical items to complete. Unfortunately, the evasive clues leading to some of them will break some players’ will to finish the game. When you have a world of this size, and you have no clear direction where to go next, it can cause blood to boil.

    55 Its a Jewlbag.jpgFast, fun and furious, combat feels more balanced than previous iterations, though some spiking in difficulty exists, especially towards the end. Not surprisingly, this adventure requires a fair amount of grinding for your team to effectively handle some of the tougher bosses. Spending time leveling and buying the best gear enables the intrepid group of adventurers to have a fighting chance towards the end. Taking the time to locate hidden weapons and armor can further help their cause. Numerous mini games such as a gambling hall, and finding hidden medals (which a merchant trades for some of the best items in the game) encourage players to take time off from adventuring to explore and kick back.

    I played the SNES remake using an English translation patch (huge thanks to “DQ Translations…excellent job!). The graphics come close to surpassing the high standard set by Final Fantasy VI. In particular, battle graphics feature well animated enemies with tons of personality, making combat more of a joy than a chore in most cases. The music brings joy to the ears with a variety of tunes to fit the theme or mood of the location or activity that party finds themselves in.

    (And, did I mention this adventure is HUGE? I won’t say more for fear of spoiling important plot details, but DANG. It’s big!)

    Bottom Line: Is it fun today? Now that I have experienced this epic adventure from beginning to end, I understand the high praise it constantly receives from those who played it. Great balance, tons of creativity and an epic adventure await any RPGamer willing to dive in. However, two or three negatives hold this title back when playing it without the rose colored glasses of time. Similar to the games before it, required, hidden objects will frustrate those who either cannot decipher vague clues and/or do not enjoy scavenger hunts over vast areas. Required grinding needed, especially towards the end, to handle bosses which completely overshadow their minions in power will frustrate others. The opaqueness of the class system, a lesser offense in my books given how the game balances out eventually, adds to list of negatives.

    Similar to my sentiments on the previous two games, my bottom line is no, I do not feel that the average RPGamer will ultimately feel his time well spent in this title today. I can think of other retro-JRPG adventures which provide similar or better experiences with fewer negatives. However, for those who have no qualms resorting to FAQs often, the game boasts many positives and a satisfying experience that clearly surpasses the other two games which came before. Furthermore, for RPGamers like myself who enjoy RPG History, one will find no experience quite like Dragon Warrior III… or better yet, the entire trilogy!

    Coming Soon: Our Favorite Polygameist dives into the arguably the most beloved game of the series: Dragon Warrior IV!

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  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2014
    dragon_quest_ivds_esrb.jpgJourney of a Utahan Polygameist


    Dragon Warrior IV: Chapters of the Chosen - Part 1


    Introduction: Released in North America in October 1992, I received the game as a birthday or Christmas gift sometime the following year. I popped it in and my first impression left me me wanting. Compared to computer RPGs I had played for years, Dragon Warrior felt simple and one dimensional. However, the following summer, I had nothing left to play on the PC, so I gave the game another crack. I eventually conquered it, without the aid of a strategy guide! Nearly a quarter of a century later, I have great memories about this game... but is it still fun today?


    Broken up into five chapters, the first four chapters of the game represent less than a quart of the time spent in the game, as they introduce the supporting cast in this epic tale. The fifth chapter introduces you, as the hero (or heroine) who will not only unite the others, but lead them to save the world from some slumbering evil that will soon awake. With that said, let's dive into this!


    Note: Because the first four chapters only represent a small part of the overall game play, I will review them only briefly to prevent this entry from becoming super long. Rest assured, if you play though them yourself, you can expect to find a lot more story in these first dozen hours.


    Chapter One: The Royal Soldiers - The adventure starts in Burland, where children have gone missing. The king commands his soldiers to address the issue. Of course, we all know they are the red shirts of the story, so to speak, so thankfully, the king also involves Ragnar, the solider, whom I play. I quickly go to work grinding up a few levels, buying new weapons and armor, and heading to that very suspicious looking cave just a few clicks to the west. Eventually, I make my way to a town where more clues leads me to a hiding place in the forest where the children play. There, I find a new friend, Healie, and boots to get me into a secluded tower. Lo and behold, a bad guy captured them, trying to find a legendary hero among them. I quickly put an end to his evil ways and returned the children home. The king, elated, granted me my one request, freedom to roam around and find the true hero foretold in prophecy.


    04 Seen Him Before.jpgChapter Two: Princess Alena's Adventure - Princess of a large, yet seemingly secluded country, Princess Alena longs to travel the world and find adventure. Despite her father's best efforts, she eventually escapes the castle. Two friends join her on her trek, Kiryl, a cleric and the wizard, Broya. We move onto a small village where a nasty monster demands the regular sacrifice of young ladies. As a princess representing the virtues of feminism, I simply cannot allow that, so I jump into the carriage (used to hold and transport the "sacrifice" and surprise this monster with fists of justice! Later, in another town, we would help some importers out of trouble. Everyone wants to be a princess! Eventually, our own father required help from our intrepid band of adventurers, eventually granting us his blessing to travel the world and seek out the looming dangers which threatens all.


    Chapter Three: Tarneko the Arms Merchant - I recall this guy's name as "Taloon" from the NES version...but, whateveh! This chapter of the game introduces us to a merchant who faces monsters, traps and some hard bargaining to get what he wants. The chapters starts with me actually running a weapon shop, which I enjoyed. As soon as I had enough money saved from commissions to afford one, I bought a better weapon. After earning money from monsters (and the expensive items they drop) , I pushed further into the world eventually saving two kingdoms from a bloody war. One of the best parts I enjoyed, I would buy armor from one town, and sell to another with need, at a profit. Before I knew it, I had well over 70,000 gold. Too bad it disappears at the end of the chapter! So, I used my new found wealth to buy my own shop (which my wife took over) and build a tunnel to connect two distant lands.


    12 Too Happy To Fight.jpgChapter Four: The Sisters of Monbaraba - Returning to a more standard plot, this chapter tells us the story of two sisters, Meena and Maya, and their quest for revenge for the death of their father. A gypsy and a fortune-teller, these two essentially function as wizard and cleric. Thankfully, Oojam joins us, eventually, to fill the role of meat-shield. Towards the end of story, things get hairy, and our heroes cannot hold their own against the overwhelming force of evil responsible for daddy's trip to the afterlife. Eventually, the duo are forced to retreat, take a ship to a foreign land, to search for a prophesied hero who might, in turn, help them to attain what they so desperately wish.


    Chapter Five: The Chosen Ones - This chapter introduces us to Phil, our aptly named hero of the game :) His village destroyed by monsters (and let us not forget the sacrifice of his friends), Phil heads out into the world to fulfill his fate: the utter destruction of the slumbering evil threatening to plunge the world into utter darkness! To assist on such an epic endeavor, our hero travels to various towns and finds others with similar aspirations (namely, the heroes we met in the earlier chapters). Managing eight heroes might be a difficult task, since mysterious forces limit any adventuring party to four. Thankfully, we find a wagon which allows us to do just that. In many areas, we can even switch out party members in the middle of combat, adding an additional layer of strategy to the typical combat formula.

    More Dragon Warrior IV coverage coming soon! See more whitty comments and screenshots on my blog.
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  • smacdsmacd Full Members
    edited October 2014
    I'm replaying DQ4 myself right now, on the Android. It's too bad you aren't playing that version, the inclusion of Party Chat really makes a massive difference and fleshes out the great cast even more.

    I just finished chapter 3 myself. It looks like you are way beyond that by now, but I do hope you remembered to exploit it to the maximum possible. Chapter 3 has so many cheap tactics that can make chapter 5 so much easier for yourself early on. Oh, and his name was Torneko in Japan, and Talloon in the US version of DW4. They compromised and named him Torneko Talloon in the remake (at least in the west), so you will occasionally see both names.

    For those who don't know the main way to exploit chapter 3
    1) At the beginning when Torneko is working for the shop in Lakanaba, keep working until someone sells you a Sword of Malice (NES) / Cautery Sword (DS/iOS/Android). Then talk to your boss to get your paycheck and never come back to work. You can also wait for a Chain Sickle, but its not important since you can get one in the cave to the north with the Safe. The reason you leave is that the sword is fairly rare, and the store only stocks the number of items that you buy for the items that are not normally in the store- but not if you are the buyer, so you can buy as many as you want later.
    2) Continue through the chapter. You can optionally buy yourself one of the Cautery Sword to equip, as it is by far the best weapon for Torneko in that chapter, and will probably last him awhile in Chapter 5 as well.
    3) Torneko gets a very high drop rate for items, and make sure try to collect 6 Steel Broadswords and 6 Iron Armors. Any extras can be sold (you might be able to use the guy in Ballymore for the Iron Armors, but the amount he gives is random and can be more or less than a regular store), or you can wait til near the end of the chapter for bigger profits using the shop in Endor. You really shouldn't need to buy any for the assignment in the plot.
    4) Near the end, you open your own shop in Endor. Completing the King's task earns you around enough to pay for the tunnel to be opened, but don't do it yet. Instead, go to Lakanaba and buy as many Cautery Swords as you can afford. Then go back to Endor and have your wife sell them. You will earn a 50% or better profit on them, as they cost you around 3500, and your wife sells them for around 5500 each. Doing a couple rounds of this will exponentially grow your money.
    5) When you are ready to finish the chapter, stock up on as many Cautery Swords as you can carry (and other expensive items if you run out of room). Leave yourself 65000 and then go pay for the cave to be dug. At this point, I don't think you can continue selling items anymore. The casino opens (if you want, you can dump a bunch of money on tokens, however they are far more expensive in Chapter 3 than they are in Chapter 2 or 5), and a few days later you can end the chapter. You lose any money you had, but everything in your bag is still there.
    6) In chapter 5, sell all the extra items you had stocked, and never have to worry about money in Chapter 5. You get Torneko quite early in the chapter as well, which helps.

    The original version didn't have a Bag of Holding, so you could only exploit it to the point of what you could carry (8 items), but the remakes are incredibly broken because of being able to take 99 of everything with you.

    I never really tried exploiting the casino in that chapter, but if you save up enough money and buy tokens, and if its actually sold in that chapter, you might be able to grab Liquid Metal Helms. But you might be better off waiting til chapter 5, since tokens cost 200gp in chapter 3, and I think its 20gp in chapter 5. Only 4 characters can equip them, so there probably isn't much need to get more, since they're very expensive.

    You also might want to hold on to the Full Metal Armor you get in that chapter rather than selling it. Torneko can't equip it, but I think you get Torneko in Chapter 5 before you can buy that armor, and I believe the Hero can equip it.

    Also, only a slight difference and probably mostly unimportant, but the female Hero is actually slightly superior to the male. Stat-wise they are identical, but she can equip dresses and the male can't, which gives her access to a few decent armors through the last chapter. However by the end of the chapter you'll likely be in either the Zenithian armor or Liquid Metal for the hero anyway.
  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2014
    Hmmmm....I could have sworn I didn't have any bag contents when I started chapter 5...but maybe stuff popped in as I gathered ppl and I didn't notice. Anywho, you're definitely playing on a much higher level than I :) Not having completed this game since the early 90's, I've completely forgotten most of the chapter 5 content altogether. My main goal on this run through is to see if I can beat the game without depending on FAQs, as I do recall beating the game way back in the day w/o a guide. I need to do another journal entry, but I'm currently around level 25, and I have some key items... liquid metal sword, mod rod, "ultimate" key, Zenethian Shield and something else that escapes me at the moment.
    Co-Host on RPGBacktrack. Follow me on Twitter and sub to my blog if you would like!
  • smacdsmacd Full Members
    edited October 2014
    Yeah, you wont start chapter 5 with anything in your bag except maybe if you picked up anything in the prologue, my recollection is that it will add to the bag as you find the characters. Another trick at least in the NES version was to make sure Brey (Borya) had the Thief's Key in his inventory, since you get him before Cristo/Kiryl and Alena. I don't remember how it works in the DS version, if you get the entire Chapter 2 bag contents when you get Borya, or if you have to wait for the other two. I guess I'll be able to verify when I get to chapter 5 myself on this run. I've only played the DS version once, but the NES version I probably finished 20+ times.

    I'll keep an eye on twitter if you need any help. Unlike the poor help I had for the DQ3 orbs, I know DQ4 like the back of my hand- to the point where I've actually first hand seen all the ultra-rare enemies in an un-modified NES version that many of the hardcore gamers still think are myths or dummied out.
  • TheAnimeManTheAnimeMan Member Full Members
    edited October 2014
    I knew where most of the orbs were in DWIII. But that's from palying the crap outta it between moving to New Mexico and finally beating it in Middle School while restarting games many times
    sig.gif

    28 years of gaming and still going strong
    and now a mostly annoyed Father with first son. And now a father again to a second son :D

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  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2014
    And that's a good point. I know they made a lot of this super hard to find to add artificial length to the game and/or to sell strategy guides/Nintendo Powers :P I'm hoping they let up a bit in the next trilogy. I've started to get a bit stumped in IV...but I'm still making progress, for the moment.
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  • smacdsmacd Full Members
    edited October 2014
    Actually I'm not sure if they made DW3 hard to sell guides or Nintendo Powers, and I doubt they were thinking about padding the length of games when the genre only had existed a few years at that point and gamers likely hadn't shown a preference for really long games... they didn't even have saves for the first two DQs in Japan, you had to use passwords. While guides probably existed (at least for DW4, not sure how much earlier they made them), I seem to recall the DW3 NES manual having a pretty thorough walkthrough of at least some, if not all the game. More likely, is that the genre was in its infancy and they really hadn't quite figured out how much guidance they needed in the game. The early DQs were surprisingly non-linear at some points compared to many contemporary and later games. Other than a few points in DW2 though, they do provide methods of figuring out where to go if you explore and talk to everyone, or use other tools like the echo flute or whatnot.
  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2014
    Yeah. Well, its certainly all conjecture at this point... but it's a pretty well known fact that RPGs (as well as other games) loved doing things to pad the play time of their games. So, I don't know for a fact if that's why they did some of this silly stuff, just an educated guess.

    DW2 was the most evil. The frighteningly vague clues left me lost, and I swear a few things didn't even have clues. Add the evil dungeon design (including that cave that breaks players' will to live) to the mix, and it certainly felt that there was a lot of paddin' going on. The variance in time it takes to beat the game with and without a FAQ is significant, to say the least.

    The echo flute seemed near useless to me. Should I blow it on every square? Every few squares? Every town? I blew on that thing for an hour or two, all over the place, and it bore no fruit. Evil!

    DW3 felt better. I was a longer experience, but clearly had more content to justify the play time. However, for me, I felt it still lacked enough direction for most modern RPGamers. And, it was a bit too much for me ... as I broke down and used a FAQ to finish the last few orbs, and a few other things.
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  • smacdsmacd Full Members
    edited October 2014
    My recollection with the echo flute is that it would say there was an echo if you were on the same map as an orb. So if you went in to a town that had one, it would echo. I think the annoying one was that for the Yellow Orb's echo, you had to have the Immigrant Town built up to the point where it actually had the Orb available. If you tried the echo flute on incomplete versions of the town, it wouldn't echo.

    Either way, can't blame anyone for FAQs on the early games. On the good side, I'm hearing that the DQ2 remake for iOS/Android actually worked to try to fix a lot of the issues with the NES/SFC/GBC version. For example, you get the Life Crest in a different location and can't actually enter the Cave to Rhone without all the Crests, so that players won't end up wasting time getting to the end just to find they don't have everything they need. Among other enhancements.

    And... rumor is that the western release of the mobile remakes of DQ2 is coming out tonight at midnight! I'm pretty excited. Sounds like the price might be $8. Then again, I'm pretty sure I'm the only one here who actually likes mobile gaming and will be getting these mobile versions. I love the interface, everyone else seems to hate them. *shrug*
  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2014
    Hmmm.... I wouldn't say I hate mobile gaming, myself. I got pretty high in Clash of Clans before I quit. I enjoy the tower defense and board games I have on those platforms. Outside of those genres, however, I rarely find them ideal over a dedicated device. First, outside of the above mentioned genres, the controls rarely feel great to me compared to having physical buttons. Second, if I use my cell phone, the battery dies much faster when gaming. That's critical, at times, during my many, longer trips. I can use my iPad instead (which has stellar life compared to even my best handheld device), but then I have a really big thing to hold rather than something that easily fits in my hand. For me, some gaming works on mobile...it just doesn't feel mobile was designed and made for gaming and, therefore, tends to feel like it isn't the best experience. But, I don't hate it.

    And, ultimately, a *lot* more people own a cell phone/ipod than an NDS, PSP or whatnot. So, chances are doing a re-release will enable many more (if they wish) to try these classic games and join me in celebrate their role in RPGamer history. And we should cheer that, rather than hate all over the idea.

    And speaking of hate, did I mention I hate the flute? Yeah. I do. This is my fundamental problem with required puzzles and hidden items in RPGs (Required meaning you have to figure them out or find them to progress). If your puzzle doesn't click with the player and/or they just can't figure out your vague clues to find your hidden item (in a world that's like 300x300 tiles? Get out!) then it puts up an immediate roadblock to further progress leading to frustration. In Pen & Paper RPGs, which I play often, these things can work well. After all, You have 4-6 players working on the solution, so your chances of at least one of them figuring out the puzzle or finding the item increase exponentially. If they still can't get it, the GM can drop hints if the players simply cannot figure something out. Or, they have the players roll "knowledge checks" to see if the character (who may be much more intelligent or experienced than the player) would figure it out. Or, if push comes to shove, the GM can move the quest in a different direction.

    My wife loves point and click adventure games where you have to click everywhere to find items, and then figure out where to use them. It seems to me that often, the 'solutions' do not make a lot of sense. My mind is just wired differently Personally, I hate adventure games. That's what I feel that the key item system in most RPGs (Including Dragon Quest) are the devil's handiwork. They work on the same premises.

    Heeey....maybe the homogenization of RPGs started way back in the NES days! EVIL! :)
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  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2014
    And, as if to prove my point about portable gaming and battery life....just gone done flying from Ft Lauderdale, FL to Salt Lake City Utah. About six hours in the plane (at least), and my DS isn't even in the red yet. That's what I call "Battery power" I got SOOO much progress done on this game during this trip...now I have a TON of journaling to catch up on!
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  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2014
    [h=2]18 Weed does a body good.jpgDRAGON WARRIOR IV: CHAPTERS OF THE CHOSEN – PART 2[/h]After finding the wayward merchant and obtaining the use of a caravan, we headed on our brand new ship and sailed south. There, in an inn, we found an old wizard who worried for his sick friend. The royal princess, Alena, ran out to find herbs which could heal his failing condition. We agreed to help him find both, and he joined us. We eventually found our way to another town where, lo and behold, they grew plenty of the very herb we needed. Unfortunately, they had a rough season or something and needed a seed found only in a dangerous cave full of lots of monsters. Honestly, they could not have chosen a more inconvenient place to hide a seed. Anyway, we headed into the cave and found our quarry. We gave the seed back to the people who grew the crops (boy, they DO work fast) and, with a plant in hand, headed back to the sick cleric. He recovered after applying the herb. Recognizing me as the hero of legend both he and the princess joined our party.

    Following another lead, we headed to the western continent, where the dancing sisters originally fought for revenge. We found Rygnar there, battling several soldiers near the room where the evil Marquis de L
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  • AncientRuneAncientRune Member Full Members
    edited October 2014
    i wish i was as motivated to do something like this i wanted to do something with the xeno series since i havent played through saga yet but to do it id have to play through gears again which i have done recently.

    keep of the good work
  • TheAnimeManTheAnimeMan Member Full Members
    edited October 2014
    i wish i was as motivated to do something like this i wanted to do something with the xeno series since i havent played through saga yet but to do it id have to play through gears again which i have done recently.

    keep of the good work

    Well considering Gears, Saga, and Chronicles are all separate in don't pertain to each other (due to copyright, Licensing and other issues)
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    28 years of gaming and still going strong
    and now a mostly annoyed Father with first son. And now a father again to a second son :D

    Winner of the 2015-2016 Fantasy gaming Pool
  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2014
    keep of the good work
    Thanks! I think now is a good time to post the last of my Dragon Warrior IV journals... As we continue the trek with the Utahn Polygameist!

    34 Its a Monster Bash!.jpgDRAGON WARRIOR IV: CHAPTERS OF THE CHOSEN – PART 3

    Finding the ancient sword would prove far more complicated than the other pieces of the gear. Our first clue lead us to an isolated continent island far to the south. Surrounded by mountains, the only point of entry took us through a river side town. There, we found a man who would willingly make us a large balloon, if we could bring him a canister of gas. No one explained to this guy that heating up the air might also get the job done. In speaking with a sad elf earlier, we learned that we needed to head into a monster's castle further inland. To cross the river, however, we would need the assistance of a titan.

    Standing a hundred feet tall, an ancient golem stood guard at our side. In order to get it to move, he had to work our way through its maze-like interior. At one point, following directions given to us earlier, we fell out of a window, around his left eye, and landed in his outstretched palm below, as one might catch a tear. We then worked our way to the levers inside his head, which made him walk across the river.

    45 How to Train..errr. become your own dragon.jpgEventually, we found our way to a castle which functionally served as the base of Psaro the Manslayer and his many followers. Using the mod rod, we changed our appearance to match our hosts, and engage them in conversation. One of the more exciting aspects of the story line thus far, speaking with the monsters turned up all kinds of interesting information. In the end, we sat and listened to a speech by Psaro himself, which told us we needed to head back west. Oddly enough, I couldn't help by think that Psaro reminded me an awful lot of Sephroth.

    We headed into the deadly gas mines there and eventually ran into Eurack (or something like that), a really big, bad evil guy slowly awakening from a long sleep. We engaged him in combat, and quickly awoke him once we discovered he posed a greater challenge asleep than awake. In defeating this giant, a guardian blocking a chest earlier disappeared. With such an elaborate, powerful guard systemin place, one might expect the chest to hold the Zenethian sword or a powerful magical artifact. Alas, it held neither of those thing. Instead, inside we found (you guess it) a canister of gas!

    We zipped back to Rivertown and traded that canister for the world's first free hot air balloon. We first investigated something Seph...errr...Psaro mentioned in that last cave about Rose, the sad elf. We found out she was killed by hands of humans while we engaged in mortal combat for the canister of gas. This would make Psaro, who already suffered from anger management issues, completely fly off whatever hinges he still had. We needed to move quickly. With only two destinations we could not access earlier, we flew to the closest one, the huge tree in the southern continent.

    49 Stop hitting yourself!.jpgAs we entered the town at the base of the tree, the town people informed us that a voice, crying for assistance from somewhere up in the branches, ask that we only bring three party members to effect his or her rescue. How arbitrarily odd! Always up for a challenge, we trimmed down our active members to meet the request and headed up. While we found working through a tree shaped and themed dungeon oddly refreshing (especially given that the leaves can resurrect the dead), we also found the existence of stair cases in the branches a bit disturbing. Nevertheless, we made it to the top and found a fallen angel near the very sword we sought. She joined our band of intrepid adventurers, and we made our way back down, treasure in hand.

    With that done, we jumped into the balloon and set course of the last, unexplored piece of land located right in the middle of our handy world map. As we sailed over the dangerous reefs and landed, we found ourselves in another large area to explore. Towards the center, we found a town of devout worshippers of the goddess who gave us great advice and a place to sleep before we trekked southwest towards the tower of ascension!

    Requiring the hero's gear as some sort of identification, the tower refused my first group which lacked the presence of our green hair leader. Having put him back in the front of the group, the tower graciously allowed us entrance. Once again, we would cleave through hordes of foul creatures before we made our way to the top and discovered a castle floating in the clouds. We spoke with many of the people who lived there before speaking with the ruler, a dragon, who had wise words regarding the imminent danger Psaro posed. Unfortunately, a bold of darkness pierced the clouds and interrupted his monologue. Ironically, this demonstration of power also paved the way for us to descent into the underworld where Psaro undoubtedly worked feverishly to bring his plans to fruition.

    53 He slow transfroms from this.jpgWe descended through a long, labyrinthine tunnel before popping out in the lava, poison infested lands below. You know you're close to the king of evil when you step into lava, poison infested lands. There, one kind soul provided us rest, a way to save our progress and critical advice in how to proceed. Why couldn't all towns make life more convenient this way? Regardless, she directed us to kill the four lieutenants powering the barriers to Psaro. We defeated them easily enough, finding out, in the process, that one of them pulled the strings leading to Rose's death. Who would have thought there was no honor among monsters?

    With the barriers down, we hit Psaro had. In all my years of gaming, I cannot recall a boss with more transformational stages. It took nearly every resource we had, but eventually we won the day, and brought a final end to his maniacal schemes! We returned to the dragon, who congratulated us on saving mankind. Then, we headed home, dropping each of our party off at their hometown to watch them reunite with loved ones. As you might recall, Phil's (the hero) hometown, and everyone in it, was destroyed in a monster attack. What happened to him? Well, you'll have to go on your own Dragon Quest adventure to find out!

    Review coming soon
    Read this entry with lots more pictures and captions here.
    Co-Host on RPGBacktrack. Follow me on Twitter and sub to my blog if you would like!
  • TheAnimeManTheAnimeMan Member Full Members
    edited October 2014
    Are you going to be doing the extra event for after completing the game?
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    28 years of gaming and still going strong
    and now a mostly annoyed Father with first son. And now a father again to a second son :D

    Winner of the 2015-2016 Fantasy gaming Pool
  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2014
    Great question.

    Since I don't read FAQs (more than absolutely necessary), I actually didn't know there was extra content. I finished my game, watched the end credits and accepted the invite to save. I reset and reloaded, out of curiosity, and found my party back in Endor. I quickly deduced that the game allowed for exploration of the world (perhaps to find all the mini tokens) after beating it. I never enjoyed spending hours on end finding hidden stuff, so I shut it off and set off to do the review.

    In writing that out, I came to a part where I felt I needed to recall a proper noun (perhaps an NPC or town name). So, I pulled up a FAQ to look it up. I noticed "Chapter 6" in the Table of Contents. Curious, I jumped down to that section to see that there was, in fact, an extra chapter.

    With the walk through and review pretty much done, and DQV already loaded into my DS, I decided against spending the extra time to drive into it. I avoided reading much further in the FAQ, but I did add to my review that players could access this optional content in the DS remake. :)

    On another note, I have not only begun V, but VII, as well. I have VII scheduled from Feb - Mar, but I have heard that it clocks in as the longest DQ game by far. With my limited console time each week, I needed a head start on it to have hopes of completing it on time. Currently, I'm about 12 hours or so into V and 7 hours into VII.
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  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2014
    [h=2]Journey of a Utahan PolygameistDragon_Quest_IV_cover.jpg[/h][h=2]DRAGON WARRIOR IV: CHAPTERS OF THE CHOSEN – Review[/h]
    Released in North America in October 1992, I received this game as a birthday or Christmas gift the following year. Broken up into five chapters, the first four represent less than a third of the time spent playing, as it introduces the supporting cast in this epic tale. The fifth chapter introduces you, as the hero (or heroine) who will not only unite the others, but lead them to save the world from some slumbering evil that will soon awake.

    Using chapters to introduce characters feels fresh and original, with each one demonstrating different party dynamics, dungeon types, etc. The most interesting chapter allows one to play as a merchant, running the very weapon shop that they would normally purchase from, and later on, working large deals between kings. This approach will help invest players heavily into the characters. Unfortunately, once chapter 5 begins, introducing the main hero, character development takes a huge back seat to the main plot of saving the world, missing a very valuable RPG opportunity. (Note: A few have told me that the iOS/Android remakes introduce interparty chat, which does help character development through the final chapter).

    15 Runnin with the bulls.jpgThis epic journey will take players to well over two dozen locations filled with interesting NPCs, vile evil-doers and dangerous monsters. Similar to Dragon Warrior III, the variety of locations and challenges keeps one interested the entire way. At one moment, the party will use a magic rod to look like monsters and infiltrate a stronghold as spies! The next, they will climb the tree of life, fending off vicious fiends to save a fallen angel. During their journey, they will make dozens of friends, discover hundreds of secrets and claim a myriad of awesome, powerful artifacts and gear. The game does a great job of starting the adventure small, and building up to an epic conclusion. Similarly, the party grows in strength with all but one feeling like pillars of power at the end.

    The graphics and sound amaze from beginning to end. DS polygon graphics rarely impress, but the sprite details, especially in combat, more than make up for it. Monsters attack towards the screen with fluid animation. And, while the player never sees his party in combat, the spell effects thrown at the monsters work well in keeping one immersed. Of particular interest, the way the screen moves as the sorceress breathes fire over all the monsters, and the camera work on the final boss, exemplify what can be done with good creative direction. Much of the music, especially some tunes carried in the towns, is especially memorable and worthy as cell phone ring tones.

    38 Yes hes that big.jpgThe heart of the Dragon Quest experience, gameplay, receives numerous enhancements in this fourth title, though it remains largely unchanged in structure. Players will move from town to town, speaking with NPCs to uncover clues about where to go next. In the final, largest chapter of the game players earn a caravan early on. Perhaps the largest change, the caravan allows a total of eight party members, instead of the standard four, though only four actively participate in fights at one time.

    More dangerous areas invoke turn based combat to resolve conflict with vicious creatures. The players must leave the caravan outside of most dungeons, requiring a choice as to whom to take. Larger caves and outdoor areas allow the wagon which, in turn, enables players to swap out party members in combat. While Dragon Quest games rarely involve deep strategy during fights, this mechanic adds some much appreciated depth. The final stand-off used this to great effect.

    The plot line and direction given to players as they talk with NPCs works better here, rendering use of a FAQ nigh unnecessary for simply completing the game. The developers made more difficult, hidden objects completely optional, leading to awesome weapons, armor and artifacts of power. Yet, one can beat the game without any of them. Combat, monster and boss battles feel better balanced as well. The leaders of evil will push players without breaking them entirely, provided they found a few hidden artifacts and/or spent minor amounts of time grinding out a few levels.

    55 Because we are unstopabble.jpgBottom Line: Is it fun today? In a word, yes. In two words, "Hell, YES!" While a bit on the short side (clocking in around 30 hours) with a few missed opportunities, this game kept me glued to my chair from beginning to end. While I miss the ability the change classes (ala Dragon Warrior III), having eight party members with a variety of unique skills made up for that. More importantly, developers made directions from NPCs less vague, making it easier to figure out where to go next without resorting to outside assistance. Combat balance received some love, as well. Along with the new caravan mechanics, the final fight left me wanting more. Given its age, this game holds up remarkably well, and the DS remake only enhances the experience with smooth battle animation, 3D visuals and enhanced sound. I can whole heartedly recommend this RPG classic to all but those who outright abhor turn based JRPGs. Others who have not yet experienced this adventure should do so without delay. Heck, even if a few years have passed since your last trip to Burland, you should consider another romp. It's that good.

    GamePro Tip! If you load your save game after you beat Dragon Quest IV, you can play a new, sixth chapter added just for the DS remake!
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  • OmbresOmbres Games horder Full Members
    edited October 2014
    In one of latest backtrack you talk about a guy on YouTube that play video game music, mostly RPG, and I was not able to find it, could you gave us a link or name of that person. Thanks
    Always enjoy all the experience in life, you might gain a level or two.
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  • AncientRuneAncientRune Member Full Members
    edited October 2014
    and now i gotta play DQ IV
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