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RPG Backtrack: Episode 124 - Mapping the World Tree

JuMeSynJuMeSyn Code: KirinAdministrators
edited August 2014 in Latest Updates
In the world of gaming, anything that can be described as educational is a definite turn-off. First-person dungeon crawlers count as learning experiences in a number of ways, but one series transformed cartography into something addictive. Its other parts do a pretty good job too.
Rich veins of discoveries to be found!
It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.

Comments

  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited July 2014
    Y'all have to let me know what you think of our new intro LOL. :) Hopefully you also like my ranting in our new RPGTrek Retrospect (Taking off the Rose Colored Glasses) segment as well!
    Co-Host on RPGBacktrack. Follow me on Twitter and sub to my blog if you would like!
  • knownameknowname KnowJob, KnowClue Full Members
    edited July 2014
    JCServant wrote: »
    Y'all have to let me know what you think of our new intro LOL. :) Hopefully you also like my ranting in our new RPGTrek Retrospect (Taking off the Rose Colored Glasses) segment as well!

    I don't ever expect to hear about bad voice acting in RPGs with these intros o.0 lol
  • OcelotOcelot is not declawed RPGamer Staff
    edited July 2014
    Well, I like to think that professional voice actors get paid a bit more than we do. :-p
    Becky Cunningham, Staff-at-Large
    Twitter: BeckyCFreelance
  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited July 2014
    Indeed. If I got paid, I probably would actually read the lines a few times, out loud, before the recording, rather than just ad libbing through it, hahahahahah. But, what about the intro music? We want to know if the "Song is Right!" ROFL.

    Interesting tidbit... I'm one of the last people to complain about thing like voice acting and translation issues. As long as I understand the story, and the voices sound somewhat decent, I have a pretty high tolerance for screw ups there. I'm one of the few who could see past Arc Rise Fantasia's "Horrible" voice acting (and its a good thing too...there's a fun combat system at the heart of that game).
    Co-Host on RPGBacktrack. Follow me on Twitter and sub to my blog if you would like!
  • WheelsWheels RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    edited July 2014
    We don't get paid?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!!?

    Damn I was really counting on a fat check from that Disgaea backtrack
    Ask Wheels- This Week's Episode
    sig.gif
  • ChickenGodChickenGod Overdosing Heavenly Bliss Moderators
    edited August 2014
    I've played through all the Etrian Odysseys in the last few years (with the exception of 1 which was a long time ago), so decided to give this a listen.

    You guys cover a lot of good stuff here. The resting/retiring of 10 levels to respec and therefore rebuild a current character or create one of the unlockable classes is a key detriment for some of the earlier games. Certain overpowered skills like Immunize, Caduceus, or Revenge and skills with questionable descriptions is also something that goes without mention from many players that has a strong impact on customization and battle. The excellent music is a staple of the series and it makes me kind of sad that many people probably don't play with headphones or alternatively go with the sound off because of being in a portable environment.

    The number one appeal of this series for me is building a custom party to fight through mazes and bosses that are designed to challenge veterans of the RPG genre. Being a veteran, one of the most boring things to me is the "Cookie Cutter" party of Tank, Mage, Fighter, Healer, and Utility. Its one of the reasons I can't stand Untold's story mode and find 1 to be very underwhelming, among the other many things you guys discussed. Etrian Odyssey 2, 3, and 4 all have a good selection of classes that allow you to build a party that doesn't necessarily have a Tank, Healer, or Mage without adding double of another class. In EO4, for example, I had no Tank class, and my Healer was actually a debuffer who acted quickly as opposed to actually healing, most of the time. This is the kind of customization I'm looking for, straying away from the norm instead of following typical tactics. Its always fascinating for me to hear how other people built their party and tackled the boss fights because its often wildly different from person to person. For instance I relied on Monk for healing in EO3 where as some of you use Princess, while my Hoplite was actually a buffing character that ignored blocking physical damage and instead worked to block elemental attacks.

    I don't think you guys covered Untold, but to me it was a huge step back for the series and I don't understand why so many people have high praise for it. Much of the conversation you guys spent talking about how great the class customization and party building were, which is why I believe most people flock to Etrian Odyssey to begin with. You also discuss the neat exploration aspects of the Airship in 4 and Seafaring in 3, which is a nice break from the typical dungeon crawl. While the story of Untold is a welcome surprise, you don't get the same sense of exploration and class building that you do with others in the series. Talking to 7th, he and I build our story party almost exactly the same, simply because there weren't very many skills to choose from with the lack of Dual Classing, being stuck with a set team, and the terrible Grimoire Stones that I've mentioned many times before that give you random skills of random levels, some of which have descriptions as bad or worse than EO1 since they can involve enemy skills. Furthermore, the number of skills in a stone and the level of the skill within is limited by your own characters level, and you won't be finding skills of max level, something which will be a norm for many players, until the very end of the game. This is troublesome, because an attack at level 10 is most likely going to do much more damage than a level 5 or 6 Fire Elemental Grimoire attack that the boss is weak to because of the those missing 5 levels are a huge loss in output. Finally, it is unfortunate that the player in Untold has to choose between seeing the main appeal of Untold, the addition of the Story, or play a classic version of the game that clearly didn't have much work put into it; not only do you still have to deal with Grimoire Stones, but the only two new classes are locked until you beat Story Mode.

    Other than that I could go on about this series for a long time. One interesting anecdote: As some of you know, my traditional names are no longer allowed in Etrian Odyssey because of the Nintendo censoring. You know, since they ban any name containing the word "weed", I can't have 3 of my staple party members, which is made worse by the fact that in game all new characters start with armor called "Tweed". It hurts having to cut up your party member's name that you've grown accustomed to in all of these adventure games that you've basically built a story around.
    "Looks like Teach just got tenure!" - Teach
  • smacdsmacd Full Members
    edited August 2014
    I haven't played these, however I have obtained copies of all the game. As for the question about a reprint, I can verify that there was one at some point around 2 years ago. Prior to that, the games were going used for around 60-70$ each when I was looking. They did a pack of the 3 DS games for $80 total as a reprint, however I had to import from Canada to get them. I have no idea if the reprints made it to US retailers.
  • VictarVictar Member Full Members
    edited August 2014
    The new intro is a little hard on the ears, but it's short and gives a shout-out to Might & Magic fans, so we cool.
  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited August 2014
    Thanks for the feedback. I'll see if I can rebalance the sounds there.
    Co-Host on RPGBacktrack. Follow me on Twitter and sub to my blog if you would like!
  • TwinBahamutTwinBahamut Staff Healer RPGamer Staff
    edited August 2014
    Okay, since I just feel like both being a little self-indulgent and talking more about how awesome Etrian Odyssey 3's class system is, I'm going to share some of the details of my guild from EO3. It changed a bit across the length of the game and had a few underutilized benchwarmers who barely warrant a mention, so I'll just list out my final party. I'm pretty proud of how it turned out.

    1) Prince/Hoplite. He's the star of the show, the unofficial main character of this game for me. Princes (and Princesses) are very tough, durable characters who can use heavy armor and shields, but have poor offense, and the Hoplite subclass plays to those strengths. Other than some defensive skills from Hoplite (including Bodyguard), he was entirely built around issuing orders to buff his allies' attack and defense or protect them from status ailments, including the Reinforce passive skill that adds a healing effect to each order. He did very little attacking, but his skills were essential. Also, he was trained in the Prince's main Tp recovery moves, so he could often restore his own TP faster than he spent it. Always fought in the front row.

    2) Hoplite/Wildling. Hoplites are masters of defense, and she was unkillable. She's the character built entirely around using the Bodyguard skill to protect a designated ally from any and all attacks. Pretty much all of her skills points were allocated to further than strategy, focusing on passive defense boosting and some skills aimed that let her break binds on herself (so she can bodyguard some more). She was my only character who had more points spent on her subclass than her main class, all for the goal of giving her the powerful Lion summon skill, which she activated at the start of each boss battle. She started in the front row, but was eventually moved to the back row to free up room, which hardly reduced her ability.

    3) Zodiac/Princess. She's an elemental attacker, focused on using the Singularity skill to deal added damage whenever she hit an enemy's weakpoint. She had a wide range of attack skills, all of which were only minimally developed. Instead, I trained her base elemental damage skills and core magical power. This meant she was great at quickly eliminating weaker foes at low cost, but had some trouble dealing damage to stronger stuff (MVP of early to mid game, kinda weak by the final battles). Her Princess subclass started as a way for her to gain access to its nice TP restoration abilities, but ultimately it gave her access to a branch of support/healing moves I didn't give to my main Prince, including one that let her remove an ally's buffs in order to heal a LOT of hitpoints, which helped her with her endgame struggles.

    4) Arbalist/Gladiator. I struggled making her work for the longest time, but in the late game, when my longterm build strategy for her finally paid off in a most unexpected way, she turned into an offensive juggernaut. Arbalists are mainly long-range attackers, but she turned into a close-range attacker who used Front Mortar to deal heavy damage, boosted by an occasional double-hit thanks to the Double Action skill. The Gladiator subclass mainly gave her the ability to spend a turn charging her power to double her next hit's damage, which ultimately saved her a lot of TP each turn and fixed many of her severe TP problems. With a good defense order always up, I never had any problems keeping her alive, either.

    5) Shogun/Princess. The last character to join my team, replacing an increasingly irrelevant Monk/Farmer. Shogun's are powerful melee glass cannons, and she became a major element in my team's offense and one of my main healers. I gave her the Princess skill that lets someone heal the party for no cost at the end of every turn in which the user is at full HP. At that point, it was a simple matter of keeping her unscathed at all times. She was built around training up her Katana skill and using two main commands: a skill that buffed her offense, defense, and made every enemy more likely to attack her, and a skill that dropped her defense, raised her offense, and let her follow up every single attack made by any ally with an attack of her own.

    The team strategy is probably pretty clear to most of you at this point. My Shogun would use her skill that draw attacks towards her while my Hoplite or Prince would use Bodyguard to prevent any damage from actually hurting her. In fact, since someone using Bodyguard takes less damage while protecting an ally than they would when directly struck themselves, this reduced my overall damage. The Shogun isn't getting killed, and instead is always at full HP, healing everyone at the end of every turn. Meawhile, the Zodiac, Arbalist, and summoned Lion are free to deal damage in their own manner (bolstered by the Prince's buffs, and those same buffs are restoring the Zodiac's TP), and the Shogun is following every attack they make with a buffed-up attack of her own. It was particularly effective against multiple targets, since the Lion's attack hits all foes and the Shogun's follow-up attack hit every target hit by the Zodiac or Lion's multi-target attacks.

    I can't say I've ever seen many other RPGs that have given me the freedom and depth of choices I needed to make a team like that. I'm really proud of it. It's not an obvious or simple strategy at all, and there are a dozens of others builds the player can attempt (my team didn't even use any status ailments or binds), but it worked, and I had a lot of fun with it. My only regret is that I never had the chance to really see some of the other options open to some of these classes. Rebuilding my Zodiac into a prophet-type as a means of protecting my team against elemental attacks would have probably helped, or maybe replacing both Zodiac and Arbalist with a different sort of attack team. Maybe on another playthrough some other day.

    Also, I'll spare everyone the descriptions of the story and personalities I invented for all of these characters. That really would be too self-indulgent. However, I'm not afraid to admit that it did exist. Really, that kind of thing is part of the charm of these kinds of games where you build an entire party from scratch, and I know I'm not alone in enjoying that kind of creativity.
  • ChickenGodChickenGod Overdosing Heavenly Bliss Moderators
    edited August 2014
    See, this is why the series is so great Twin. I also used a character with the exact same class as you did, Hoplite/Wildling, but it had a completely different set of skills and role. Yours was a powerful tank that focused on damage mitigation, completed a strong defensive combination, and also contributed to the party's overall damage by summoning a Lion. Mine on the other hand used no physically defensive skills, but completely mastered the Anti Elementals for specific fights, used Primal Drums/Bestial Roar to debuff enemies, and summoned a Mole or Owl in order to bind enemy parts to further work on the debuffs. Also Milk was a Shogun in EO3, such a perfect class! :angel:
    "Looks like Teach just got tenure!" - Teach
  • VictarVictar Member Full Members
    edited August 2014
    OK, after listening to the entire FOUR HOUR podcast...

    You guys may not get paid for VA, but that's a shame, as some of your skits are more hilarious that multimillion dollar TV shows. Also the Inspictor Gadget parodies in shows past were like a time warp to my childhood. It's scary how good a performance those were.

    I played EO1 (original) and EO2 completely, including the bonus strata. I don't think you guys ever mentioned that both games actually have TWO endings. The first is for completing the fifth stratum. The second is for completely filling out your "dungeon journal" of monsters, dropped items, and craftable items. This necessarily requires conquering the the bonus stratum, but it also involves repeatedly farming bosses until they've dropped everything in the game.

    The "bonus endings" are little more than an NPCs telling you, "Congratulations! You uncovered all the secrets of the Labyrinth" followed by another credit roll, but it's still a nice acknolwedgement of the player's dedicated obsession. I don't know if EO3 and EO4 also have "bonus endings" for doing absolutely everything.

    EO1 had a nasty twist in the story where the party is ordered to "exterminate the Forest Folk". Moral grey area, much? The player later learns that Forest Folk work for the same guy who gave the extermination order, so yeah. Sucks to have their job. I haven't played EO Untold yet, so I wonder if it tweaked this rather brutal plot development, or the player's role in it.

    In EO1, the "standard" party to easily (relatively speaking) get through the main game was PLSMA - Protector, Landsknecht, Survivalist, Medic, Alchemist. In the postgame, swapping out someone (not the medic) for a Troubadour was ideal. My opening battle sequence for just about every sixth stratum battle was Survivalist's First Turn on the Medic's (broken) Immunize, followed by the Troubadour regenerating TP while the party unloaded attacks.

    The final boss of the "bonus stratum" is absurdly cheap and virtually impossible to defeat unless you plan your strategy around a turn guide from GameFAQs; he almost always does his attacks in a specific order.

    EO2 rebalanced the classes to an extreme degree. EO2 DH's (im initialing them, not naming them) are worth using; EO2 Landsknechts are not. EO2 Survivalists are weak at combat and mostly useful for their non-combat skills. Hexers were near-useless in EO1 because they had zero damaging attacks, but in EO2 they have Revenge, a bizarrely, absurdly broken attack skill. I remember very clearly that my original party struggled with FOE's in the fifth stratum, but once I swapped out my Survivalist/Gunner for a DH/Hexer, they could ambush and 1-turn kill FOEs easily.

    EO2's bonus boss also had a turn guide, but the easiest way to kill him is the cheap way. Farm up a pile of consumables to replenisth the super gauge. Every turn, the Protector uses his super power to make the party invincible, two low-HP Hexers pelt it with Revenge, and the other two party members are item flunkies who use consumables to replenish the Protector's super meter. It was the only way I could kill Muckdiles in EO2, also.

    Thank you for the EO3 strategies; I'll try some of them when I get around to playing that game. I shelved it because having to use a FAQ to get the "true ending" annoys me. Also, I found the new classes confusing.

    I really don't remember DQ2 being that brutally obnoxious, except for some enemies that would wipe out my party unless hit with Sleep or Stopspell. Oh, well.

    I also don't see what the big deal is about not getting 3DS DQ7. We have PSX version to play, which is more than I can say for any number of JRPGs, starting with the sequel to Unchained Blades. I'm more annoyed that the "party chat" bonus dialogue was removed from the DS version of DQ4, but at least the "party chat" dialogue is in DQ5 and DQ6 for the DS.
  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited August 2014
    Victar wrote: »
    OK, after listening to the entire FOUR HOUR podcast...
    I also don't see what the big deal is about not getting 3DS DQ7. We have PSX version to play, which is more than I can say for any number of JRPGs, starting with the sequel to Unchained Blades. I'm more annoyed that the "party chat" bonus dialogue was removed from the DS version of DQ4, but at least the "party chat" dialogue is in DQ5 and DQ6 for the DS.

    Wow...we got not just one, but two beefy follow up posts. I'll have to find a way to get these read on the air. However, since I haven't beat either game, I'll get right to your bottom comment. As someone currently working on the DW/DQ series, I feel I can speak to this.

    Yeah, I have the PSX version, myself. I think any serious collector found a way to get this in his/her collection since, without it, one does not have a complete, English translated DQ series. While it can be a little hard to find outside of ebay, it usually retails used for about $40.

    Personally, I much prefer to have it on handheld, though. As I get older (and busier), I find it easier to beat beefy RPGs on handheld. Heck, I beat PC games faster than PSX games since I can take a laptop with me and play them. But when my job sends me on long road trips, my console all but stops. Not to mention, I can play a handheld while working out, doing errands (when I have a lot of time waiting on my wife, etc). And, unlike DQ8, I do not feel the game gains much being on a console. DW7 graphics looked dated when they came out. I bet even a PSP could handle the game without breaking a sweat (seems to handle every other PSX game well enough). I certainly wouldn't be losing graphic fidelity. Whereas, with DW8, unless it was on the Vita, done right, I know we would lose some graphic fidelity in the transition.

    But, no I do not believe its the end of the world. I would just like to see it happen. :)

    PS. I'm glad you liked the skits. Yeah, I love old 80's cartoon references. Look at the reminder I made for my wife. She does payroll and has to remind the team to do their time cards. She likes finding humorous ways to do so, so I volunteered to do it one week...

    Darkwing Payroll.jpg
    Co-Host on RPGBacktrack. Follow me on Twitter and sub to my blog if you would like!
  • Strawberry EggsStrawberry Eggs Hands off the parfait! Administrators
    edited August 2014
    I still have yet to try the Etrian Odyssey games. I keep meaning to at least give Untold a try...I really should step that up. :)

    About the Vampire Castle in Bravely Default, it can certainly be hairy on Normal and Hard (more so on Hard, on imagine. :P). Those Cerberuses (Cerberi?) are especially nasty; even at level 99, they can still counter you to death if you spam Brave and hit them physically. I find that the best way to handle them is use the Templar job's Rampart as often as possible, and having at least one other character use the Ninja classes's Utsutsumi in order to hit them physically. Fire Charms or the Spiritmaster's Greater Spirit Ward will help greatly against their Hellfire. Actually Spiritmaster in general would help a lot in that castle, as its Fairy Ward prevents all status aliments, and there's still those Vampire Bats' confusion and the demon's ability to charm. Of course, you'll want a magic user for the Cerberuses.

    I like the Vampire job myself. Getting it is a lot of work, but it has many really useful abilities, and getting the Genomes (monster abilities) aren't difficult, especially by using the Ninja's Kairai.
    Bravely second...
    The courage to try again...

    Twitter: BerryEggs

  • WheelsWheels RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    edited August 2014
    Did we fail to mention during EO3 talk that you can make a NINJA/PIRATE?!?!?!

    Also random aside. I don't like the ability in EO Untold to warp to any floor. That sounds weird, but part of the series for me is managing your resources, and exploring to the very limits of those resources, so being able to just warp to any floor takes away form that. Seems like something that should be reserved for easier difficulty.
    Ask Wheels- This Week's Episode
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  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited August 2014
    Whoa. Ninja/Pirate? that's just...Mindblowing! Man. I need one of those!!
    Co-Host on RPGBacktrack. Follow me on Twitter and sub to my blog if you would like!
  • smacdsmacd Full Members
    edited August 2014
    Victar wrote: »
    I really don't remember DQ2 being that brutally obnoxious, except for some enemies that would wipe out my party unless hit with Sleep or Stopspell. Oh, well.

    I remember playing DW2 back when it was new on the NES. The game was definitely hard, but at the time it was difficult to tell since we simply didn't have anything "easy" to compare it to. And since most NES games were simply brutal, it made sense. However, the big issue with DW2 was that it gave very little direction in the middle part of the game after you get the boat (even including incorrect directions from the one NPC to give a hint, if I remember correctly). The Cave to Rhone also pretty much required hand making makes (hmm, maybe the EO team should remake DQ2 lol). This game was the only game I ever actually called the Nintendo help hotline for, after spending weeks stumped on where to go. Thank God for the internet, the Nintendo hotline was a complete ripoff. The sheer difficulty of this game is likely why the original NES DW3 instruction manual contained a very long walkthrough for a good portion of the game (if not all of it? I don't remember)
    Victar wrote: »
    I also don't see what the big deal is about not getting 3DS DQ7. We have PSX version to play, which is more than I can say for any number of JRPGs, starting with the sequel to Unchained Blades. I'm more annoyed that the "party chat" bonus dialogue was removed from the DS version of DQ4, but at least the "party chat" dialogue is in DQ5 and DQ6 for the DS.

    It may not be a big deal to you, but for those of us who are big fans of DQ in the west its a big deal (both old timers like myself who remember the dark days of the mid 90s, and new fans too). Enix has always been known to not just do remakes of their games, but significantly enhance them (unlike Square..). Sure, many of us have the original PSX version, but there are a lot of us who want to play the new version rather than dig out the old one. Its a 3D remake, they apparently streamlined it so that its more of a 60 hour game rather than a 100 hour game, and a localization here would undoubtedly include a better translation (of which the owner of this site has some stories about). And yeah, the removal of party chat from DQ4's remake was bad, but its hardly comparable to not getting an entire game.

    As for Unchained Blades, I also feel that not getting its sequel is hardly comparable to not getting any DQ game. But maybe my bias there. I finished UB, but it was very much meh, and most people didn't bother getting beyond chapter 1 or 2 let alone finishing it. I'd trade getting any other JRPGs localized for a 100% chance of all DQs being localized.

    Either way, I've pretty much given up hoping for DQ7 to be localized. Much like Wheels, I plan on importing the game and a Japanese 3DS in the near future.
  • WheelsWheels RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    edited August 2014
    smacd wrote: »
    I remember playing DW2 back when it was new on the NES. The game was definitely hard, but at the time it was difficult to tell since we simply didn't have anything "easy" to compare it to. And since most NES games were simply brutal, it made sense. However, the big issue with DW2 was that it gave very little direction in the middle part of the game after you get the boat (even including incorrect directions from the one NPC to give a hint, if I remember correctly). The Cave to Rhone also pretty much required hand making makes (hmm, maybe the EO team should remake DQ2 lol). This game was the only game I ever actually called the Nintendo help hotline for, after spending weeks stumped on where to go. Thank God for the internet, the Nintendo hotline was a complete ripoff. The sheer difficulty of this game is likely why the original NES DW3 instruction manual contained a very long walkthrough for a good portion of the game (if not all of it? I don't remember)

    My "fondest" memory of playing Dragon Warrior 2 on gameboy (have yet to play the original NES version) was getting the boat and landing on some island I was clearly not at the level for and getting one party member kidnapped. Things did not go well from there.
    smacd wrote: »
    It may not be a big deal to you, but for those of us who are big fans of DQ in the west its a big deal (both old timers like myself who remember the dark days of the mid 90s, and new fans too). Enix has always been known to not just do remakes of their games, but significantly enhance them (unlike Square..). Sure, many of us have the original PSX version, but there are a lot of us who want to play the new version rather than dig out the old one. Its a 3D remake, they apparently streamlined it so that its more of a 60 hour game rather than a 100 hour game, and a localization here would undoubtedly include a better translation (of which the owner of this site has some stories about). And yeah, the removal of party chat from DQ4's remake was bad, but its hardly comparable to not getting an entire game.

    As for Unchained Blades, I also feel that not getting its sequel is hardly comparable to not getting any DQ game. But maybe my bias there. I finished UB, but it was very much meh, and most people didn't bother getting beyond chapter 1 or 2 let alone finishing it. I'd trade getting any other JRPGs localized for a 100% chance of all DQs being localized.

    Either way, I've pretty much given up hoping for DQ7 to be localized. Much like Wheels, I plan on importing the game and a Japanese 3DS in the near future.

    (This is mainly aimed at Victar even though I'm quoting smac)

    Unchained Blades is a fun little game, but man it's no Dragon Quest, let's be frank.

    In addition to the things you mention I think DQVII's lack of a localization has put the future of the series here into question. Sure we did just get the iOS port of DQVIII, but that doesn't use a new localization or anything. I don't think the Monsters titles ever did a ton sales-wise in the West so missing those and the third Slime game (why didn't you all buy Rocket Slime? :( ) was somewhat understandable, but two main series titles now (DQVII remake and DQX) not coming over here? You have to understand Victar how that makes DQ fans feel. More than anything else seeing DQVII make it overseas would just erase this feeling of dread. So look at more as "we want the series back" and not just "we want that one game even though there is a version of it in English".
    Ask Wheels- This Week's Episode
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  • PawsPaws Purr RPGamer Staff
    edited August 2014
    Also, several former staff members who worked on DQ7 can attest to the fact the company that developed it went bust before the NA version was finished, meaning the translation we got was about six steps back from where it should have been. So yeah, we got DQ7, but not in the form it really should have had.
  • VictarVictar Member Full Members
    edited August 2014
    Wheels wrote: »

    [...]

    You have to understand Victar how that makes DQ fans feel. More than anything else seeing DQVII make it overseas would just erase this feeling of dread. So look at more as "we want the series back" and not just "we want that one game even though there is a version of it in English".

    I understand your point better, now. I'm a DQ fan too, though. In addition to playing 1-7 (8 and 9 are in the backlog), I contributed the DQ7 Monster Park Quote List to GameFAQs. I didn't do a text dump to make that list; I tamed every monster in the game and then wrote down their quotes. My final DQ7 game time was over 200 hours. (I wonder if any of the monster quotes I transcribed were written by RPGamer staff members?)

    DQX not coming here doesn't bother me because it's an MMO. I am completely convinced that it wasn't brought here because Square-Enix knew it could not compete against World of Warcraft, FF14, and all the other MMO's. I am completely convinced that DQXI will be brought here, assuming it's not another MMO. The DQ spinoff games are less likely to come here, but we did get DQ Swords, so I wouldn't give up hope yet.
  • WheelsWheels RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    edited August 2014
    Victar wrote: »
    I understand your point better, now. I'm a DQ fan too, though. In addition to playing 1-7 (8 and 9 are in the backlog), I contributed the DQ7 Monster Park Quote List to GameFAQs. I didn't do a text dump to make that list; I tamed every monster in the game and then wrote down their quotes. My final DQ7 game time was over 200 hours. (I wonder if any of the monster quotes I transcribed were written by RPGamer staff members?)

    DQX not coming here doesn't bother me because it's an MMO. I am completely convinced that it wasn't brought here because Square-Enix knew it could not compete against World of Warcraft, FF14, and all the other MMO's. I am completely convinced that DQXI will be brought here, assuming it's not another MMO. The DQ spinoff games are less likely to come here, but we did get DQ Swords, so I wouldn't give up hope yet.

    Honestly? I'm not convinced DQX not making the way over here is a matter of any sort of competition. I mean they didn't seem bothered by this when launching and then (successfully) relaunching FF14. We'll see, I will continue to hope for Dragon Quest's glorious return to the West.
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