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Review - The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

WheelsWheels RPGamer StaffRPGamer Staff
edited April 19 in Latest Updates
The latest Zelda game has arrived as a launch title for Nintendo's new console and it's about time. Find within if we think it's divine or a calamity.

Review - The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild
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Comments

  • MyopicMirrorMyopicMirror Full Members
    I miss dungeons.
  • WheelsWheels RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    I miss dungeons.

    The game has dungeons? (no I don't mean the shrines)
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  • Strawberry EggsStrawberry Eggs Hands off the parfait! Administrators
    I intend to play this game on Switch, once I actually get one and find the time to play console games again. I find it a bit odd that I haven't played Breath of the Wild despite becoming more of a Zelda fan in recent years.
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  • MyopicMirrorMyopicMirror Full Members
    Wheels wrote: »
    I miss dungeons.

    The game has dungeons? (no I don't mean the shrines)

    I really hope if Nintendo plans on more "open air" Zelda they spend more time creating dungeons, shrines really don't fill the void.
  • SlayerSlayer Member Full Members
    Thank you for your detailed review. I hope I can borrow a system to play it someday.
  • WheelsWheels RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    Wheels wrote: »
    I miss dungeons.

    The game has dungeons? (no I don't mean the shrines)

    I really hope if Nintendo plans on more "open air" Zelda they spend more time creating dungeons, shrines really don't fill the void.

    The game has 5 full dungeons dude (counting hyrule castle as one)
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  • bmesickbmesick New Member Full Members
    best open world game of all time. I'm not sure how you follow up a game like this. it rekindles the spirit of discovery and wonder that no game has done for me in many many years. it's not just the open world but the sheer amount of ways you can experiment and be rewarded with results. it's a masterpiece in game design. it's not without flaws but it does most things incredibly well.
  • UltraKev9UltraKev9 Demi-Plane of Semi HemispheresFull Members
    Don't mean to rain on anyone's parade but there's an awful lot of the use of the word "annoying" to warrant a 5.0 grade. Plus, everything in this game seems like it has already been done from mood music to cell shaded graphics. Dunno. I grew up in the eighties with the first Zelda game and watched what they've become over the last thirty years. Seems like it's still kid elves and cringe-inducing storytelling. Maybe I grew up but the series hasn't?
  • MyopicMirrorMyopicMirror Full Members
    Wheels wrote: »
    Wheels wrote: »
    I miss dungeons.

    The game has dungeons? (no I don't mean the shrines)

    I really hope if Nintendo plans on more "open air" Zelda they spend more time creating dungeons, shrines really don't fill the void.

    The game has 5 full dungeons dude (counting hyrule castle as one)

    Didn't they feel unusually short to you? I would strongly disagree with the use of the word "full" here as they were large empty spaces with only a handful of enemies and limited puzzle solving. They seemed like starter dungeons that were only half finished, Majora's Mask dungeons felt fuller and that game is nearing 20 years old. I thought the idea of being able to move an aspect of the dungeon was pretty cool the first time I did it, unfortunately, being able to shift the dungeon back and forth was all the innovation that they got and when I completed my first one I thought, "Is that all there is?". I would say Hyrule Castle is no more of a dungeon than Eventide Island is, but that's just splitting hairs.

    I enjoyed the game but I had to remind myself a few times that I was playing Zelda.
  • WheelsWheels RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    Didn't they feel unusually short to you?

    They did not, but part of that may be that the meat of the game is obviously the world itself so I wasn't expecting them to be super long.
    I would strongly disagree with the use of the word "full" here as they were large empty spaces with only a handful of enemies and limited puzzle solving. They seemed like starter dungeons that were only half finished,

    "Limited puzzle solving" is flat out not true, the entire dungeon itself is a puzzle. I agree they felt oddly combat-lite, but on the flip side this game obviously has more combat elsewhere so I didn't mind it. They felt like complete and contained enteties.
    Majora's Mask dungeons felt fuller and that game is nearing 20 years old.

    You specifically said I miss dungeons as if the game none at all, if you miss the fuller dungeons of games past that's something entirely different. It's not like this is the first Zelda game to focus less on the dungeons.

    Majora's Mask, as well as Wind Waker would be good Zelda games to compare this too since they both similarly take the emphasis away from dungeons to focus on other things. Wind Waker's dungeons gave me more of a feeling of "is that it?" even if they may have been technically longer in some respects. Yes Majora's Mask had longer dungeons 20 years ago, it also had an extremely tiny world and boring bosses so I'm not sure what your point is? The dungeons clearly weren't intended to be as big. They don't need to be. In short - the game has dungeons, and they are good, comparing precise length and depth to previous Zelda games that focused more on dungeons seems pointless.

    I thought the idea of being able to move an aspect of the dungeon was pretty cool the first time I did it, unfortunately, being able to shift the dungeon back and forth was all the innovation that they got and when I completed my first one I thought, "Is that all there is?".

    All of them do this in different and interesting ways so I was pretty excited to see how the next one used it after completing one. It was a nice change from the usual pattern of instantly recognizing what tool I'll be finding in a dungeon and then most of the puzzles becoming trivial. As mentioned in the first paragraph, they felt similar to the approach of dungeons in a Link Between Worlds.
    I would say Hyrule Castle is no more of a dungeon than Eventide Island is, but that's just splitting hairs.

    Not really. Traditionally, the final dungeon in a Zelda game combines all the tools and skills you've gained over the game as a final test before the boss fight. Such is the case here, as there are numerous ways to approach reaching the summit of the castle using the skills you've learned over the course of the game. I would have liked a few puzzles, but then I don't think they would have fit.
    I enjoyed the game but I had to remind myself a few times that I was playing Zelda.

    I find this strange. It's not as if Zelda hasn't tried wildly different things in the past (Zelda 2? Wind Waker? The more open nature of a Link Between Worlds? MAJORAS MASK?). Breath of the Wild's world in many ways seems to go out of its way to feel familiar, staying true to general layout of Hyrule, fitting in references to past games, familiar music, familiar enemies, familiar combat. Really scratching my head here.
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  • WheelsWheels RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    UltraKev9 wrote: »
    Don't mean to rain on anyone's parade but there's an awful lot of the use of the word "annoying" to warrant a 5.0 grade. Plus, everything in this game seems like it has already been done from mood music to cell shaded graphics. Dunno. I grew up in the eighties with the first Zelda game and watched what they've become over the last thirty years. Seems like it's still kid elves and cringe-inducing storytelling. Maybe I grew up but the series hasn't?

    The only annoyances I mentioned were a few optional locations and features, and weapon management, which was a minor annoyance mentioned mostly in passing.

    No idea what you're on about beyond that (I've been playing the series just as long).
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  • BudaiBudai Paladin Full Members
    UltraKev9 wrote: »
    Don't mean to rain on anyone's parade but there's an awful lot of the use of the word "annoying" to warrant a 5.0 grade. Plus, everything in this game seems like it has already been done from mood music to cell shaded graphics. Dunno. I grew up in the eighties with the first Zelda game and watched what they've become over the last thirty years. Seems like it's still kid elves and cringe-inducing storytelling. Maybe I grew up but the series hasn't?

    Every great game has negatives, it's just up to what makes it great to out weigh the bad in such a way that it's negated. I personally didn't find anything cringe inducing in the slightest. Which part did you not like?
  • MacstormMacstorm Ysy St. Administrators
    This isn't a game that I personally care for that much, but at the same time I can totally see where the high scores are coming from and don't balk at them.
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  • MyopicMirrorMyopicMirror Full Members
    Wheels wrote: »
    "Limited puzzle solving" is flat out not true, the entire dungeon itself is a puzzle.
    Wheels wrote: »

    You specifically said I miss dungeons as if the game none at all, if you miss the fuller dungeons of games past that's something entirely different. It's not like this is the first Zelda game to focus less on the dungeons.

    What I should have said was, "I miss dungeons being important". Yes, this game has dungeons, it has four short areas you can call dungeons, such as a hallway you can tilt left and right and a tall room with waterwheels where you adjust a hose to divert the water. I would have liked the dungeons to be longer, more innovative and exciting. If Nintendo can revamp the world of Hyrule, I believe they could have done more inside the dungeons, as well. In BotW, the four core dungeons feel like an afterthought because so much time and attention was placed on the open world.
    Wheels wrote: »
    I enjoyed the game but I had to remind myself a few times that I was playing Zelda.

    I find this strange. It's not as if Zelda hasn't tried wildly different things in the past (Zelda 2? Wind Waker? The more open nature of a Link Between Worlds? MAJORAS MASK?). Breath of the Wild's world in many ways seems to go out of its way to feel familiar, staying true to general layout of Hyrule, fitting in references to past games, familiar music, familiar enemies, familiar combat. Really scratching my head here.

    In most previous Zelda's your strength was tied primarily to the dungeons themselves and what items you attained in them. This game didn't feel "Zelda-like" to me because they gave you most of your power ups(magnetism, etc.) in the first handful of shrines and most of your weapons are dropped by enemies, as opposed to inside dungeons. Also, they are completely optional, nothing inside them is necessary to defeat the final boss. Even Link between Worlds, which allowed you to buy all your items, still required you to complete dungeons. I'm not trying to be some purist here, because every game you listed felt like Zelda to me. Majora's Mask is my favorite and it doesn't have Zelda, Ganon, or Hyrule anywhere in it, I just didn't feel the same way about BotW and I believe the reason comes down to the dungeons and their waning importance.
    Wheels wrote: »

    Not really. Traditionally, the final dungeon in a Zelda game combines all the tools and skills you've gained over the game as a final test before the boss fight. Such is the case here, as there are numerous ways to approach reaching the summit of the castle using the skills you've learned over the course of the game. I would have liked a few puzzles, but then I don't think they would have fit.

    All the tools and skills like climbing a cliff, para-gliding directly in front of the final boss' room and bypassing the entire thing. I can acknowledge Hyrule Castle as a dungeon since it, much like the other four, is completely optional.

  • WheelsWheels RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    What I should have said was, "I miss dungeons being important". Yes, this game has dungeons, it has four short areas you can call dungeons, such as a hallway you can tilt left and right and a tall room with waterwheels where you adjust a hose to divert the water. I would have liked the dungeons to be longer, more innovative and exciting. If Nintendo can revamp the world of Hyrule, I believe they could have done more inside the dungeons, as well. In BotW, the four core dungeons feel like an afterthought because so much time and attention was placed on the open world.

    You are way oversimplifying the dungeons. You are right they don't hold a major importance, but that's not really a negative. Like I've mentioned, I enjoyed them quite a lot, and found the puzzles far more interesting than those in some recent entries, and the bosses more exciting than any the series has produced in awhile (they got way too easy for awhile).

    In most previous Zelda's your strength was tied primarily to the dungeons themselves and what items you attained in them. This game didn't feel "Zelda-like" to me because they gave you most of your power ups(magnetism, etc.) in the first handful of shrines and most of your weapons are dropped by enemies, as opposed to inside dungeons. Also, they are completely optional, nothing inside them is necessary to defeat the final boss. Even Link between Worlds, which allowed you to buy all your items, still required you to complete dungeons. I'm not trying to be some purist here, because every game you listed felt like Zelda to me. Majora's Mask is my favorite and it doesn't have Zelda, Ganon, or Hyrule anywhere in it, I just didn't feel the same way about BotW and I believe the reason comes down to the dungeons and their waning importance.

    I still find this bizarre. Yes the dungeons were required for sure in basically every previous Zelda, but like BotW they still were not the core of the experience in WW and Majora's Mask. They feel even LESS so here because as is obvious the massive world is its own focus, its own dungeon. "Find item -> use in dungeon" was already a tired formula they wanted to escape from based on Link Between worlds. Mechanics wise it certainly is the biggest shakeup in a long time but wasn't the series due one? Why on earth, given the frequent focus on bows, did it take this long to have archery integrated in the main combat controls?

    All the tools and skills like climbing a cliff, para-gliding directly in front of the final boss' room and bypassing the entire thing. I can acknowledge Hyrule Castle as a dungeon since it, much like the other four, is completely optional.

    You can certainly do that if skilled at dodging guardian lasers, but its no walk in the park. But you are right in the optional part, which is the point. Breath of the Wild is the player's own adventure, encapsulating as much or as little of it as they want. I think this is the beauty of the game. As I pointed out at the end of the review, there's a blueprint here for the future of the series that can provide all sorts of adventures (yes with more of the dungeons we all love). Breath of the Wild is fine without a heavy focus on dungeons because the world is the dungeon essentially. I can't say the same for whatever comes out of the series next.

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  • BudaiBudai Paladin Full Members
    edited April 22
    I sort of looked at each of the cities and the story line before the dungeon as part of a whole. Rather than just the dungeon, I think of the zora sequence(my favorite), as a package all together. I was satisfied with all four of the main sequences. The way that they balanced them to be done in any order, but also making your reward meaningful, was well done in my opinion. These rewards I found better than an item you may or may not use again, or if you did it's just road block nothing more.

    I will always enjoy some of zelda's larger more well done dungeons, but I also felt sometimes being taken away from the world and locked in one spot for hours on end 9 times became a formula I was losing interest in. I like how some of the dungeon was basically put outside of the dungeon, in a clever way. Just because there isn't the same roof over your head doesn't mean the content isn't deep and still there. There can be a balance, and we can see how they approach it in the future.
  • JCServantJCServant Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    @Wheels knew it would be just a matter of time before I chimed in here :)

    I find the overflowing, unrelenting, praises of nigh perfection of this game to be quite interesting. Unfortunately, I do not feel the same. For me, the game is pretty darn good, but not 5/5 good. Currently, a dozen hours in... it's around a 4. And, I really can't seem to tear myself away from Horizon Zero Dawn and Persona 5 to sink more time into it right now.

    I know there's a TON of praise for the game design going back to the original Zelda in that you can basically tackle the adventure in whatever order you want. While I agree that it's refreshing in a way, and a welcome shake up to this series, I don't really feel like it's the bee's knees. Being able to go straight to Ganon's dungeon isn't that awesome when you're going to get struck down the moment you walk in. In a way, it's a false option. Now, you DO get to choose just how much you prepare before you go face him...and that's very reminiscent of the original Zelda to me. So, I'm a fan of it, do not get me wrong. I just don't think it's 'all that.' Maybe it's because I've played a number of open world games, i.e. GTA, Read Dead Redemption, etc, where you can tackle the main story OR do lots of side things to better level/gear/money up so you are better equipped to handle the main story. Obviously, this is different as you can go STRAIGHT to Ganon...but these other examples DO have a story to tell as you work though. And I'm one of those silly people who actually like the stories that games like HZD, GTA4, RDR, etc have to tell. I prefer that over "Hey, listen! Beat Ganon! He's bad! He kicked your tushie before! Now it's your turn! GOGOGOGO!"

    @Wheels has often said this isn't really an RPG, and I would tend to agree. I'm not trying to open up a forbidden debate, but, rather, point something out. In my 'action/adventure' games, the gameplay has to be super tight. It has to hook me, make me feel awesome, and want to do it over and over again. Zelda's combat is good, but not great IMHO.

    A big part of the reason, for me, is the constantly breaking weapons...which pretty much forces me to use whatever I can find, no matter how weak it is. It would not be such a big deal if they didn't break so often, and switching them forced pausing in combat. In Horizon, Zero Dawn, switching between weapons/ammunition uses a radial menu that slows down time matrix style. It's really well done, and keeps you immersed in the action while switching things up. Hell, Megaman figured this out years ago when Megaman X let you swap weapons with the shoulder buttons rather than pausing. I know Zelda BOTW *does* let you switch in combat, but from what I recall, it just felt very clunky. The control scheme doesn't help things out here. So, I opted for doing it in menu so I would't continue to be frustrated. And, IIRC, it's the only way to eat food...which is the primary way to restore health in a tough fight. Did I mention I hate pausing in combat? I don't know why, but I just found swapping weapons in GTA, RDR, Ratchet & Clank, etc., to be much smoother.

    So, a lot of reviewers praise the game for being open world, without holding your hand. I.E., if you played any of the newer open world games, you know how they like to fill up your map with a ton of icons indicating things to do/find. You get to discover all of it...ah the thrill of discovery! Personally, I like the icons :P I have spanning 30 minutes trying to find a shrine that I *know* is close, but I just don't know where it is at. I'm not a huge fan of the whole "find secret seeds to increase your inventory space" mechanic...as the beginning inventory space for melee weapons is frustratingly small. I try to just ignore it all and feel a wee excited the occasion I run across a seed :pensive: Anywho, I think choices would be great here... giving the player the choice by being able to buy maps, or making the map notated in easy mode, but not hard... might work better here.

    Finally, as I mentioned to Wheels, I'm not a fan of the climbing mechanic. It's praised as you can 'climb anywhere.' It drives me crazy because I cannot tell ya how much time I wasted because I *thought* I could climb a cliff, but I just couldn't make it. Or, I thought a ledge was a valid place to rest and recover my stamina, to find out it was not. EVIL. I hate wasted time... he climbs so slow, that when you finally find out you were wrong, you've wasted a solid 2 minutes. If he just climbed 3x as fast.... it would alleviate my complaint here. I know you get some faster climbing gear...I've already found some, but so far, it's pretty minor improvement.

    Oh wait...one more gripe. Weather mechanics make me cranky. I see a mountain WAY over there. I set my heart on climbing it. I travel 10 minutes to get there...fighting a few things on the way. I get off my horse and it starts raining. You cannot climb when it rains. You have to wait it out, pick your nose, or walk around and hope you find one of those hidden seeds :P My whole point is that ANY game mechanic that asks patience from the player for "reasons" makes me cranky. My free time is precious. I don't want to wait for the rain to stop, and I don't want to make that trip again. So I pick up my cell phone to play Clash Royale while I wait for it to pass. This a major no-no...making me want to play cell phone games. EVIL. A extraordinary adventure game keeps me glued to set nearly every minute I'm playing it.

    With that being said, there's a ton I do like about the game, too. I just didn't go much into that because I feel that people have sang this game's praises and what it gets right...so I'm sure y'all have heard that side. And I do enjoy the open world, the graphics, the interactivity of the world's inhabitants (I loved watching moblins hunting boar), the mystery of the shrines and the total nostalgic kick back to the original I get when playing this game. I just feel that the issues above are enough to hold this game back from the coveted 5/5...at least in my eyes. A 4/5 is still a high score to me. We'll see how I feel when I eventually get back to it and finish it. Everyone's entitled to have an opinion, and they are all valid. If you read this far, you are awesome :dizzy:
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  • ChickenGodChickenGod Overdosing Heavenly Bliss Moderators
    edited April 22
    Its funny when a game has become so acclaimed that its not even a surprise that it gets a perfect score, including from sites that have high standards and only rarely award them like RPGamer does.

    I agree with both the review and some comments in the thread from JCS and MyopicMirror. BOTW is flat out amazing, its hard for anyone to deny that, but there are still a few issues the game does have that can bother folks. Similarly, there are magical things in the game that person X loves where person Y may never see because of how vast and unique its mechanics can be. An example would be the ability to turn a rail car into a makeshift Go Kart using magnesis and a treasure chest.

    Its intriguing because BOTW has room to build on its foundation, even though objectively its one of the better games ever released IMO. The swimming for example is pretty bad, the dungeons + their respective end bosses within could have been more varied aesthetically and offered more meat on the bone for those who would like to choose that type of content to enjoy. Inventory management and the weapon breaking mechanic has room for improvement. When you compare how the soundtrack is used to an Automata or a P5 you realize how the mood and atmosphere could be enhanced for the player in that regard. A friend of mine was showing me different themes she liked in the game, and I didn't even recognize half of them in spite of playing the game upwards of 100 hours.

    However at the end of the day the game was such a treasure that its easy to look past how things could be improved upon and appreciate it immensely for what it is. BOTW doesn't crack, say, my top 20 games of all time like Berseria and P5 have. But it is really amazing regardless and I think its more than deserving of a range of perfect to near perfect scores.
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  • WheelsWheels RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    ChickenGod wrote: »
    Its funny when a game has become so acclaimed that its not even a surprise that it gets a perfect score, including from sites that have high standards and only rarely award them like RPGamer does.

    I agree with both the review and some comments in the thread from JCS and MyopicMirror. BOTW is flat out amazing, its hard for anyone to deny that, but there are still a few issues the game does have that can bother folks. Similarly, there are magical things in the game that person X loves where person Y may never see because of how vast and unique its mechanics can be. An example would be the ability to turn a rail car into a makeshift Go Kart using magnesis and a treasure chest.

    As they say, no game is perfect, and open world games less so. For me what really stuck was how everything in the game fit together with such cohesion. The way the story is presented for example, fits the wandering nature of an open world game perfectly. The pacing was just brilliant. You start in a tutorial area sure, but instructions aren't hammered down constantly and its more about giving a safer sandbox to get used to the game before being unleashed.
    ChickenGod wrote: »
    Its intriguing because BOTW has room to build on its foundation, even though objectively its one of the better games ever released IMO. The swimming for example is pretty bad, the dungeons + their respective end bosses within could have been more varied aesthetically and offered more meat on the bone for those who would like to choose that type of content to enjoy. Inventory management and the weapon breaking mechanic has room for improvement. When you compare how the soundtrack is used to an Automata or a P5 you realize how the mood and atmosphere could be enhanced for the player in that regard. A friend of mine was showing me different themes she liked in the game, and I didn't even recognize half of them in spite of playing the game upwards of 100 hours.

    The possibilities for future Zelda games have become numerous and exciting. Revisit a Majora's Mask style mechanic in a world of this size? Another Wind Waker with a less empty ocean? Just another game this size with more dungeons? I can't wait to see what they do next. I will disagree on the music, as I think the way it uses music is fantastic and helps immerse the player in the world, especially combined with the sound design.
    ChickenGod wrote: »
    However at the end of the day the game was such a treasure that its easy to look past how things could be improved upon and appreciate it immensely for what it is. BOTW doesn't crack, say, my top 20 games of all time like Berseria and P5 have. But it is really amazing regardless and I think its more than deserving of a range of perfect to near perfect scores.

    It certainly has cracked mine, as I continue to play it still over fully digging into P5 or finishing Horizon. Not sure I'll ever forgot that feeling after first stepping out of the shrine Link wakes up in and realizing what you're in for.
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  • cpapadimitrioucpapadimitriou RPGamer Staff
    Haven't played this game but I find it so hard to believe that the story is a 4 in a Zelda game. I'm super tempted to buy it just for that, but I will probably be disappointed, so I will resist :D Other scores seem in line with what Zeldas are typically like though so nothing too surprising here.
  • WheelsWheels RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    Haven't played this game but I find it so hard to believe that the story is a 4 in a Zelda game. I'm super tempted to buy it just for that, but I will probably be disappointed, so I will resist :D Other scores seem in line with what Zeldas are typically like though so nothing too surprising here.

    It's quite good, and no your typical Zelda tale. What really surprised was how well it fits in with the non-linear approach to the game. You aren't missing any story by doing things in a different order. Stories in the various regions are self-contained, and discovering things about the past doesn't need to happen in any particular order. It just works, and the characters you meet are entertaining as well. If it had a version of Groose it may have made a 5/5.
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  • ChickenGodChickenGod Overdosing Heavenly Bliss Moderators
    edited May 19
    Looks like I missed what you had to say earlier Wheels. I do agree on most of your points, specifically the one about the future direction of Zelda being a very bright one.

    I'm also surprised you like Groose, he's actually one of my favorite characters and I hope he gets another chance in a new Zelda somewhere down the line.
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  • cpapadimitrioucpapadimitriou RPGamer Staff
    Wheels wrote: »
    Haven't played this game but I find it so hard to believe that the story is a 4 in a Zelda game. I'm super tempted to buy it just for that, but I will probably be disappointed, so I will resist :D Other scores seem in line with what Zeldas are typically like though so nothing too surprising here.

    It's quite good, and no your typical Zelda tale. What really surprised was how well it fits in with the non-linear approach to the game. You aren't missing any story by doing things in a different order. Stories in the various regions are self-contained, and discovering things about the past doesn't need to happen in any particular order. It just works, and the characters you meet are entertaining as well. If it had a version of Groose it may have made a 5/5.

    Ugh, you're making me want to pick up a Switch. Quit it!
  • WheelsWheels RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    ChickenGod wrote: »
    Looks like I missed what you had to say earlier Wheels. I do agree on most of your points, specifically the one about the future direction of Zelda being a very bright one.

    I'm also surprised you like Groose, he's actually one of my favorite characters and I hope he gets another chance in a new Zelda somewhere down the line.

    Skyward Sword was my favorite Zelda game until recently dethroned!
    Ugh, you're making me want to pick up a Switch. Quit it!

    did I mention the character modals are nice?

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