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What Are You Reading? Suggestion/Review Thread

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  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited December 2010
    Slowly making my way through the Wheel of Time, on Path of Daggers right now. Such a great series, it only gets better, contrary to many reviews i've read of the later books.
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • SpartakusSpartakus One Knight Stand Full Members
    edited December 2010
    I'm finishing The Aenid these days and wow, two months since I started reading it, guess you can tell it's been an exceptionally slow read for a book that's only about 300 pages. I finished Romance of the Three Kingdoms in about the same time.

    As much as I enjoy Virgil's language on an aesthetic level, the plot and characters are so extremely derivative of The Iliad and The Odyssey it's like he just wanted to write his own version of those stories set in Italy. It's Homer fanfiction, really. One narrative technique he adopted from Homer that I'm not so crazy about is introducing lots of new characters at a time, describing how utterly awesome they are, and then a few lines (literally) further down they all get killed. I'm not sure what ancient readers got out of this, but in Homer's case I can sort of understand it since he's working off a partly historical basis and in real life that's what happens, but it seems pointless in a work of pure fantasy.
  • StormofSwordsStormofSwords Crazed Bullet Miser Full Members
    edited December 2010
    Books, huh? I finished Bram Stoker's Dracula a second time, which was enjoyable, if too drawn out, and then I read Batman: The Long Halloween, which was amazing.
    Madness is a complete statement. Saying more would be pointless.
  • EmeraldSuzakuEmeraldSuzaku Member Full Members
    edited December 2010
    Slowly making my way through the Wheel of Time, on Path of Daggers right now. Such a great series, it only gets better, contrary to many reviews i've read of the later books.
    Yes, yes it does. You're pretty much right around the major quality upswing, too. The pacing picks up an insane amount once you hit The Gathering Storm, by the way. Consequently, being able to read the whole thing straight through goes a long way towards alleviating some of the pacing and character issues in the middle books. A lot of the complaints along those lines stemmed from having to wait years (and years, and years....) between some books--things do move along at a decent clip throughout the books, but back when they were released readers were stuck with the characters in stasis for half a decade at a time sometimes.

    I'm reading Dracula, by Bram Stoker, and Hyperion, by Dan Simmons. Both are enjoyable, if very different books. I'm really liking the Canterbury Tales-like structure of Hyperion.
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2011
    I have no idea how he read it, but my father found Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter a really good read, and so I've started. Thus far I've learned another Hidden Historical Fact: the French Revolution actually occurred because the people were fed up with Louis XVI ignoring the plight of the poor, which was their constantly being killed by vampires lurking in Paris.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • HyphyKezzyHyphyKezzy The Best Full Members
    edited January 2011
    Been doing a reread of the Song of Ice and Fire books in preparation for the upcoming HBO series. Finished the third book yesterday, and am taking a quick break before the fourth with The Science Fiction Weight-Loss Book edited by Isaac Asimov, George R.R. Martin, and Martin H. Greenberg. Basically a collection of horror-tinged scifi short stories designed to help you lose weight by making you not want to eat.
    Reads street English and speaks in collegiate - Ras Kass
  • Just DougJust Doug Member Full Members
    edited March 2011
    I read James Clavell's Shogun not too long ago, at the suggestion that it reads "like a science-fiction novel." Takes place in Japan in the year 1600, with a cast of characters and plot that is generally, loosely, based on 16th~17th century Japanese history. I can see where the person was coming from since if you don't know anything about Japanese history/culture it's like the main character Blackthorne (an English Captain-Pilot) really does wind up in an alien world. For me, it was interesting because I know a bit about Japan and though the fact that it takes place in 1600 makes it very different just by being feudal and pre-modern, but still there are things that have changed entirely...and some things that don't seem to have changed one bit! That does allow Shogun to be a bit of a window on Japanese culture, as long as you keep in mind how different somewhere like the world Blackthorne comes from is different from Western society today, and what that means for the Japan presented in the book.

    The actual writing was good, at least to the point that I have nothing bad to say about how Clavell writes, but the only real praise I can give enthusiastically with regards to style is how well he handles a setting where characters are constantly speaking three or four languages among each other due to the main character being an Englishman in a Japan where only Portuguese are allowed to trade. There is some sparse Japanese in the book too, mostly to help illustrate Blackthorne's increasing competancy in speaking and understanding it. Anything not easily understood from having been said fifty times already he makes sure to translate.

    My one caution is that the ending, which handily tied up the many dangling threads of the plot and was in many ways satisfying, can be a little confusing with the expectations you might have developed versus what's actually happening. I could feel the stack of remaining pages shrinking and kept wondering when the big to-do was going to erupt and so-and-so would finally get to go kick some butt. Then I realized that what I was reading was the height of the action and that there wouldn't be any room for anything besides resolution by the time it was over. So for over half the book I'd been thinking it would lead up to something that never happened, and didn't realize it wouldn't happen until I was already neck deep in the climax. Not really bad, it was still a good last act for the book, so much as a little disorienting for me. It may be a tad too easy to miss the suspense building underneath the calm facade at certain places in the book.
    "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
    Than are dreamt of in your philosophy." - Shakespeare, Hamlet Act I, Scene 5

    "You need mad bank for lobster cash." - Sabin1001
  • Hero Killer IdHero Killer Id Member Full Members
    edited April 2011
    I'm currently reading Flesh by Richard Laymon. Richard Laymon is my favorite author and definitely worth checking out if you are into horror or splatterpunk novels. But then again if you are into either you probably all ready are aware of Mr. Laymon. Great reading. After that I'm meaning to read The Wise Man's Fear by Patrick Rothfuss. I loved The Name of the Wind and am eager to get into the sequel I just have so many other projects going on at the moment with games, anime, etc.
  • nectarsisnectarsis Member Full Members
    edited August 2011
    A Spell for Chameleon by Piers Anthony...reliving Xanth from my childhood. After that moving on to the Dragonlance Chronicles.
  • Cassandra RamosCassandra Ramos Eternal Kyoshi Administrators
    edited September 2011
    I picked up and finished reading Alcatraz Versus the Evil Librarians, Brandon Sanderson's fantasy series aimed at a younger audience than most of his other books. It's been a long time since I took out a book from the childern's room at the library (I had to get this via interlibrary lone, too). It's a heck of a lot smaller than his usual doorstopper novels, and the larger font size also caught me off guard. Regardless, it's still a good book, even if it doesn't quite measure up to Mistborn and Way of Kings his well thought-out magic system and excellent usage of Chekov's guns and plot twists. It'll be a few days until I read the next one, as I also have to get that loaned from another library.
    Bravely second...
    The courage to try again...

    Twitter: BerryEggs

  • Sharkey360Sharkey360 Member Full Members
    edited September 2011
    I like reading classic horror/suspense/sci-fi illustrated tales from the 1950s as published by EC Comics. While I was on my way out after the Comic-Con in San Diego concluded, I passed by this booth that was desperately selling its paperbacks of EC Comics - at $5 each. That affordable, I bought 4 TPBs for $20.

    Here are a few pages from those paperbacks.

    308859_263319970359632_100000448935979_971345_544488_n.jpg
    308449_263321367026159_100000448935979_971351_4222567_n.jpg

    Does anyone else here read EC Comics?
  • Options
    edited September 2011
    in these days i have to read "paulo coelho" this is very good writer. all books of paulo coelho is very good if u r read his book one time then u r read his book all time...
    did u read his books?

    regards
  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Chomping my way through the Harry Potter series. Loved the films, and the books are amazing too! Lots of detail left out of the films for obvious book to film translation reasons.
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • RainaRaina Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Reading the conclusion to Gregory Maguire's Wicked books with the latest book Out Of Oz. It's really good and I've been enjoying reading it.
  • Cassandra RamosCassandra Ramos Eternal Kyoshi Administrators
    edited January 2012
    I finished reading the remaining three books in Brandon Sanderson's Alcatraz series, and may I say they are excellent! I love Alcatraz's (he's the narrator) snarky comments and fourth wall-breaking. It makes the story a bit unorthodox, and he overdoes it in the fourth book (it's really breaks my ability to get into the story when every character, not just Alcatraz is semi-aware of being characters in a book and commenting on it). Even so, I love how the narration characterizes Alcatraz, making him a fascinating character. Right off in the first book he states that despite what many others believes, he isn't a good person and is a liar. This may seem puzzlng, but over the course of the books, you being to see why. The other characters are pretty good too, especially Bastille (my favorite character). What I also love about these books is that they are partially a parody on typically fantasy literature, especially those aimed at a younger audience. Sanderson seems to especially like taking cracks at Harry Potter. If you come across these book, or are already a Sanderson fan and haven't read the Alcatraz series, I highly recommend it. I sure hope he comes out withe the last book some time soon.

    Another fascinating book I just finished is called The Planiverse by A.K. Dewdney. I literally came upon this book randomly at the library. I couldn't decide if I wanted to read a science book or start a new fantasy series (I've been meaning to read the A Song of Ice and Fire books). That's when I came across Planiverse. I guess it can be considered something of a sci-fi. The book is about a computer scientist who creates a program that simulates a completely 2-dimensional world with some of his grad students. As the program becomes more complex and various aspects of the world from biological to physics are simulated, one of the "intelligent lifeforms" that inhabit the program starts to talk to them through the computer. As it turns out, the program is somehow able to form a communication link between our 3D world and a parallel universe that is actually 2-dimensional. Object are able to move east-west and up-down, but not north-south. The 2D being they contact is named Yendred and is part of a race of creatures called the Nsana. The book center on how the scientist and his students watch and talk to Yendred as he travels across his country, learning how this 2D world works. Although how exactly the computer is able to connect to a 2-D world is handwaved (the scientist speculates that because their program is very similar to the Planiverse, they somehow harmonized with each other), the details paid attention to the way the world's physics, chemistry, biology, astrology, and cosmology works is astonishing and believable.
    Bravely second...
    The courage to try again...

    Twitter: BerryEggs

  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Alonza wrote: »
    HI..........

    I am reading my favorite novel, About 50 Ghost to story.
    Its an interesting novel...

    .............................Cool.........................
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • maryadaviesmaryadavies She Shoots For The Stars Somewhere east of Atlanta, GAModerators
    edited February 2012
    Confessor; sorry about that. Just had a little spambot come though here, it's been killed. Carry on ^^

    As for me, been reading Mercedes Lackey's Arrow's Fall on my Ipod lately. ^^ Good book and good ending to a good series, I recommend it if you like fantasy. :)
    93a24222217c9c20a686db8be4676a84.jpg
    My personal page
    New to the boards? Confused? Find the answers here.
  • KeldarusKeldarus RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    edited February 2012
    I just finished up Mockingjay. I thought the ending was sweet, but the rest read like fanfiction and missed a lot of important details that should have had some focus on them.

    I think i'll move on to finishing up Transmetropolitian next only 2 more volumes to go!


    Recently finished up Relic from Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child. The first book in their Pendergast series. It was a great start and I'll continue listening to them and some a second time.

    Currently listening to Succubus Blues on audio book. Pure pulp smutty fun.
    -Kel
  • RainaRaina Member Full Members
    edited February 2012
    Currently reading 11/22/63 by Stephen King. The opening prologue made me cry, the emotion it conveyed was so powerful. I've been reading and reading, enjoying King's storytelling.
  • RazaRaza Member Full Members
    edited February 2012
    I have a love/hate relationship with Stephen King. Most of his novels I really can't enjoy, or some cases can't even stand. When he shines, though, you see why he's so popular. For me actually, his most recent releases (Under the Dome, Full Dark- No Stars) were really incredible. Plus the Dark Tower series was really, really interesting...especially The Gunslinger and the 3rd one (can't remember the name right now. The one with Bain (Bane?) the train).

    Full Dark, No Stars was so good I remember finishing it ANGRY that it ended. I'd dig another 4 or so mini stories in the same vein he wrote that in.

    I also dig his non-horror "drama" stuff like The Green Mile.

    While we're on the subject did anyone like The Stand? For me, it was too long and honestly kinda hard to follow at times, but it did have some good bits in it as well.
    A critic is someone who stands on the mountaintop high above to watch a battle, and then comes down to shoot the survivors.
    -Hemingway
  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited February 2012
    The Stand was beyond amazing, but very, very dense. Overall, I think the guy is terrible. But he does have a few gems.
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • Cassandra RamosCassandra Ramos Eternal Kyoshi Administrators
    edited February 2012
    I've been reading The Hidden Reality by Brian Greene. It's a book on the theories and plausibility of parallel universes. I must say, when it comes to theoretical physics for non-scientists, I prefere Michio Kaku's books to Mr. Greene, but I'm still liking it well enough.

    While not a book per se, and despite the fact that I own the physical book, I have also been listening to a Graphic Audio production of Bradon Sanderson's Warbreaker. I've listened to Elantris and really enjoyed it. This one is quite good as well, though some of the minor characters are a bit over-acted. I'm also a bit taken aback by the Idrian characters being giving vaguely Scottish accents. I know Idris is suppose to be in the mountains, so I guess that's suppose to be an explanation/excuse. I always find it amusing when a fantasy series feels the need to use real-world accents. Then again, it probably isn't easy to make one up.
    Bravely second...
    The courage to try again...

    Twitter: BerryEggs

  • HyphyKezzyHyphyKezzy The Best Full Members
    edited February 2012
    Comics this last week. Specifically Bone: The Complete Cartoon Epic in One Volume. I still have the first bunch of issues from when it was coming out in comic book form but my collecting habits fell off somewhere between 10 and 15 issues in. The last few years I've been going back to the ones I loved and picking them up in graphic novel form and now it's Bone's turn. I'm about 2/3 through now and it's just as fun as I remembered, I'm thinking I'll pick up another copy to send to my younger cousin for his birthday.
    Reads street English and speaks in collegiate - Ras Kass
  • KeldarusKeldarus RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    edited February 2012
    Been catching up on some comics that I've had for like a year, mostly the new D&D series from IDW, Supergods is next. Once they're caught up, I'll probably read Pacific Vortex! from Clive Cussler.


    -Kel
  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited February 2012
    So took a break from moving onto The Goblet of Fire to reread The Road by Cormac McCarthy. I was in that kind of mood and it took me just an afternoon. Such a beautiful book, anyone who has not read it needs to do so.
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • KeldarusKeldarus RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    edited February 2012
    Started reading the second volume of American Vampire and on the audible side of things we're listening to Reliquary by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child.


    -Kel
  • TheDoomhammerTheDoomhammer Prod with the Prod Full Members
    edited March 2012
    Just finished The Looking-Glass War by John Le Carre. Fantastic book about a British WW2-era intelligence agency's desperate and doomed attempt to stay relevant in the cold war.

    It got a recent re-release that declares it a "George Smiley novel" and though Smiley has an important (but small) role, it's hardly his book. Ah, film tie-ins.
  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited March 2012
    Currently enjoying my second run through of A Song of Ice and Fire. Game of Thrones (TV) inspired me to reenter the world!
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • KeldarusKeldarus RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    edited March 2012
    Supergod from Warren Ellis. It's strange but like all of his stuff very well written. The art is quite nice as well.


    -Kel
  • Cassandra RamosCassandra Ramos Eternal Kyoshi Administrators
    edited April 2012
    Just finished reading another "I saw this at the library, never heard it before, but it looked and sounded interesting" book, The Monkey Bible by Mark Laxer. It's a fascinating and moving novel that both holds a strong ecological message and tries to bridge the gap between the religious-minded and the scientifically-minded. It's a pretty fast read, too.
    Bravely second...
    The courage to try again...

    Twitter: BerryEggs

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