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Heroes of Might and Magic V

7thCircle7thCircle Proofer of the RealmRPGamer Staff
edited January 2010 in Staff Review Blogs
Time: 9/6/09 11:30AM
Progress: Campaign 1 complete

There are many western RPGs RPGamer "covers" but you wouldn't know it because they don't have reviews or game pages. Most of the reviewers over the years have been strictly console gamers, and wasting time to write up a review for a game that came out ages ago is a selfless task with even less of a payoff than the normal volunteer reviews we write.

I bought a PC recently and thought now would be a good time to play a couple of the PC RPGs I've owned for a while. When I realized that the PC RPG genre was dead a few years back, I held on to the last unplayed RPGs I had and chose to save them for a rainy day. Since then, some more RPGs have come out (of course), and Heroes of Might and Magic V is one I bought for cheap in 2007 and added to my collection of "games to play later." I'll write a review for it when I'm done.

My history with the series is this: I got HoMM 2 several years after it came out. I enjoyed it, but it was too hard for me toward the end. I got stuck, and this was when a new awesome PC RPG came out monthly, so I quickly tossed it back in my game wallet and figured I might retry it later. My game wallet and the dozens of games in it was stolen in 2004, so I never went back to it.

I had an eye on HoMM 4 -- I liked the idea behind the HoMM gameplay -- but reviews were negative. HoMM 5 was well reviewed so I bought it and here I am. I like RPGs, duh, but I also like strategy games and simulations. I figured HoMM 5 should be a good tactical RPG set in a western fantasy world.

I've finished the first campaign, and so far I'm disappointed. It's mindnumbingly easy, and I think the entire campaign was meant to be like a tutorial. A tutorial that felt like it lasted 20 hours. The premise still seems cool to me, and hopefully the challenge will pick up later. The graphics are awful when you consider that it came out in the same year as Oblivion. The cutscenes don't move past a head-bobbing person whose lips don't move "talking" to another head-bobbing person whose lips don't move, and all the cinematographic camera swoops in the world can't save them. Also, when you can see at the start that the last level is named "The Fall of a King," it's a serious plot spoiler for how the campaign will end.

Nitpicking aside, it has been mildly enjoyable. Sure, the first campaign won't win any Mensa awards, but I still like the ideas behind it. You control a hero with an army of creatures. You move around the map in a turn-based manner, looking for goodies and killing anything that won't flee or join you. Encounters with an enemy on the map take you to a battlefield view where units move and attack in a turn based manner until one army is vanquished.

Eventually, you get control of a town, and then resource management is important. You build structures to let you recruit new units -- which only replenish once a week -- and also spend money on the units when you recruit them. As I said, there was no challenge or need to be hasty in the first campaign, so I took my time with all of it.

Where HoMM 2 failed me as a tactics game was when I hit a map where I started way behind the enemies in terms of awesomeness, and their AI was on full aggro. I'm hoping HoMM 5 settles somewhere between the ease of this opening campaign and the wall I hit in HoMM 2.

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Time: 9/8/09 12:30PM
Progress: Campaign 2, Mission 3

Oh Hubris! For so long have You been my enemy!

After dissing the game's difficulty, I promptly died at the first mission of the second campaign. Not at the beginning, mind you, but at the final battle, and these stages are long. The game is kind enough to autosave frequently, but heartless enough to only keep three autosaves. All three of mine were too close to the end to consider using.

To step back a bit, this mission was the first one that took a specific strategy to beat. I'm now controlling a demon army. The stage starts with the powerful human I just controlled at the end of the first campaign chasing me down. He's impossibly strong. So I spend the whole mission keeping as much distance between us as possible, fleeing like a sissy, gathering troops when I can. When I get to the end of the map -- YAY! IT'S OVER! -- No. Wait. There's another large army sitting at the exit, waiting for me. And it crushed me.

So I did what any hardcore gamer would do. I didn't touch the game for the rest of the day. I cleaned the apartment instead. I went out on a date. I drank red wine until I fell asleep. Okay, so I'm a bit girly for a hardcore gamer, but the next day I was ready to dive back into HoMM. I had made a quicksave near the end of the mission. I loaded it, spent my gold more wisely now that I was expecting the final battle, and that was really all it took to win this time.

The next mission was crazy long, though. I feel like I played it all day yesterday. No challenge at all. Again, there seemed to be a specific way you are supposed to play it -- namely, take your time and don't push the exploration too soon. At least, that's what I did and the level was easy.

An odd quirk to the game is that it gives you a hint regarding the difficulty of a fight. When you put the cursor over a foe, a text box will approximate the units in the opposing force and let you know how tough the fight will be. This estimation is usually accurate, but in this mission I went into a fight that the game thought would be a "Normal" challenge and I got totally owned. It wasn't even close. Later in the stage, I went into a "Normal" challenge and didn't lose a single unit. It's sort of funny. One thing I've missed about PC gaming is the ability to save anywhere, anytime. I'm much more likely to take risks by leaping into fights where I'm sure how it'll go.

=======================
=======================
Time: 9/12/09 3:00AM
Progress: Campaign 2, Mission 4

My PSU and video card arrived today. So a little background info about me. While I am a nerd and I do love me some video games, I've never built, taken apart, or upgraded a desktop before. Back when I was in college and it was trendy to build your own desktop, I was too poor to do it. I was gifted a laptop, which I needed to play games at work, and didn't have enough of my own money to build a gaming rig. A few weeks ago I decided to finally get a gaming PC. Without the experience of building a computer from pieces -- and based on the nerds I knew in college, a self-built PC has a 75% chance of melting sometime, somewhere -- I opted to buy a bare bones PC for $300, then buy a video card and slap it in there myself. Of course, the bare bones PC's PSU could only power crappy cards, so I had to buy a new power supply too.

So today I found out that upgrading a computer is actually easy. Very easy. And now with a 4870 Radeon running HoMM 5 instead of the poor processor on the motherboard, I can pump the graphics to the max. And yeah. It doesn't look so ugly anymore. I still say it's a few steps down the ladder from Oblivion, which came out around the same time, but at 1900x1080 HoMM 5 is much, much easier on the eyes.

As for the gameplay itself, these missions are so long! I played for several hours today and must have been having fun since it seems to be 3am now. I beat 0 missions today. None. I had to reload a couple of times -- I made the mistake of exploring at the start of this stage and blindly ran into a gigantic enemy army. Curse you fog of war! So I had to restart from the beginning once. Aside from that I haven't lost much time.

You definitely have to think in this game. Being reckless is a fast path to a game over. This map is pretty big, so I kept my if-he-dies-I-get-a-game-over hero in safe places, recruited a second hero to lead a large army into risky places, and then recruited a third hero to generally suck and die. She escaped from a bad battle once, but lost a later one before I could flee so she's gone for good now. She did stall the bad guys enough to serve her purpose. I've pretty much won this mission -- I own every town on the map except for the one I need to win the stage -- but it might take another hour just to get to that point. This game plays slowly.

=======================
=======================
Time: 10/3/09 2:00AM
Progress: Campaign 3, Mission 3

The game has gotten easier, but missions are certainly no shorter. I spent my entire evening on the third mission of the necromancer's campaign just to hit a bug at the end of it that keeps me from finishing the stage. I know PC gaming and bugs go together like Square Enix and lazy remakes, but hitting one that makes you replay a several hour long mission is ridiculous, especially for a game that's been patched many times. Tomorrow I'll research it and see if I can use a cheat code or something to get around it without restarting. For now, a quick google search showed me that this is a bug many people have encountered and whined about.

This is just a guess, but I think I glitched my game by being too good at it. The current map has 3 mandatory towns to conquer and 1 optional one. One of the mandatory towns is the nation's capitol, and the mission's scripts anticipate that you'll take over that city last. It's surrounded by tough garrisons full of foes, but I was able to take them out with a medium-sized army and take over the capitol 2nd instead of last. I think this is what broke the game. It's an odd bit of level design anyway. Once you've taken over the entire map, this mission comes up with a contrived condition that suddenly needs to be met. For some reason, once your army contains 20 dragons, an invisible wall lifts and then you get a big mission successful banner on your screen. My problem was that I met this criteria before I had taken over the entire map, and the invisible wall didn't lift when I did the objectives out of order.

And as a strategy game, this is one of HoMM V's regular flaws. It often finds extra tasks for you to complete after a stage is clearly won. Chances are that by the time you've completed the original objectives, you've probably destroyed your enemies and taken all or most of the map in the process. Then the game will tell you to take over one more town, or make a bigger army, or defeat one more hero, or whatever, using barriers to enforce the new objectives. It draws out the gameplay and makes the levels boring. When I know a challenge is over and I've won, I don't want to play for two more hours to meet some new objectives. HoMM 5's pacing is way, way too slow for that.

I'm less than halfway through HoMM 5, and I'm not sure if I'm going to finish it. It bores me as often as it interests me. Time does fly by while I play it, but more because it takes so long to do anything worthwhile than because I'm having fun. There was a time in my life when any game that made me lose track of the clock was a game worth playing. As an adult now with one of those job things, if I'm going to lose a day to a video game, I want it to also be a blast to play, and HoMM 5 is not. I'd guess that I've sunk over 60 hours into it already, and like I said, I'm less than halfway done.

=======================
=======================
Time: 10/9/09 6:15PM
Progress: Campaign 3, Mission 3 Cheaty-Complete

After five minutes of research and .cfg changes, this:

@Win()

And now I don't have to replay a stage because of a bug. Yay! When PC nuts drone on and on and on about how PC games are superior to console games, they need to emphasize this wonderful feature more often.



The lesson here is that dreams inevitably lead to hideous implosions.
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Comments

  • flamethrowerflamethrower Member Full Members
    edited September 2009
    I thought it was too hard...
    I lost four or five times on the first mission where they pit you against an A.I. opponent (I think it is mission 4) before giving up.
    I hear later patches added easy mode. I suppose I could try that.

    I enjoyed Heroes of Might and Magic III. It is available from GOG.com for $10.
  • Anna Marie PrivitereAnna Marie Privitere Purr RPGamer Staff
    edited September 2009
    I'm surprised we're covering this, although I guess V does a lot more in the RPG way then the prior titles. Bear in mind that there's actually been a number of good PC titles, but the best ones are invariably ported to console as well, making the distinction between the two superfluous.
  • flamethrowerflamethrower Member Full Members
    edited September 2009
    I wasn't aware that there were many console releases of Heroes of Might and Magic.
    I heard of Heroes of Might and Magic: Quest for the Dragon Bone Staff (PS2) which is a remake of Heroes of Might and Magic.
    And Heroes of Might and Magic II is on Game Boy Color!?
    Heroes of Might and Magic III is on Dreamcast!?
    I seriously never knew that. But yes, I think II and III are the best in the series.

    ...Every game in the series is available for Macintosh too.

    Also, there's the upcoming Might and Magic: Clash of Heroes, which is only for NDS.
  • Anna Marie PrivitereAnna Marie Privitere Purr RPGamer Staff
    edited September 2009
    I didn't say HoMM was on consoles. I said good PC games were ported to consoles; it was in answer to:
    Quote: wrote:
    When I realized that the PC RPG genre was dead a few years back, I held on to the last unplayed RPGs I had and chose to save them for a rainy day. Since then, some more RPGs have come out (of course), and Heroes of Might and Magic V is one I bought for cheap in 2007 and added to my collection of "games to play later." I'll write a review for it when I'm done.
  • SandySandy Final Fanatic Full Members
    edited September 2009
    I've always thought of HoMM (which is a great game series, I own parts III, IV and V) as a strategy game, not really an RPG. Sure, you play some roles, but that happens in all games. The gameplay and battle system just don't match with other RPGs this place covers.

    I'm not saying this shouldn't be covered here, because Zelda games are too, and they're blatantly adventure games, I just don't think most of the fanbase of HoMM visit here. :/
  • 7thCircle7thCircle Proofer of the Realm RPGamer Staff
    edited September 2009
    I thought it was too hard...
    I lost four or five times on the first mission where they pit you against an A.I. opponent (I think it is mission 4) before giving up.
    I hear later patches added easy mode. I suppose I could try that.
    Whoops. Wasn't trying to insult anybody's skills there. smile.gif That must have been the last mission of the first campaign where bad guys bombard you for a while. The game clues you in to the fact that you should stay on the defensive for a couple weeks. I did that and it was a breeze.
    Quote: wrote:
    I've always thought of HoMM (which is a great game series, I own parts III, IV and V) as a strategy game, not really an RPG. Sure, you play some roles, but that happens in all games. The gameplay and battle system just don't match with other RPGs this place covers.

    I'm not saying this shouldn't be covered here, because Zelda games are too, and they're blatantly adventure games, I just don't think most of the fanbase of HoMM visit here. :/

    True, but this applies to all tactical RPGs this site covers, and I've pointed out to important staff people many times that the distinction between strategy games we cover and strategy games we don't is ridiculous. We should either cover all or none. For HoMM, my guess is that we cover it because it's an extension of the Might and Magic series more than anything gameplay related.

    As for readers not caring, we get a decent number of requests for reviews of PC RPGs that were skipped back in the day. The issue is that only three staff members who have written reviews lately play PC RPGs, and two of them aren't reviewers. You have to catch one of us playing an older PC RPG at a time we have the drive and time to review it, knowing it'll go into the database and sometime, somewhere, someone will look it up and be happy.
    The lesson here is that dreams inevitably lead to hideous implosions.
  • MacstormMacstorm Ysy St. Administrators
    edited September 2009
    I'm surprised we're covering this...
    This is pretty much 7th's affirmative action plea for PC strategy games to be covered in the same way we cover games like Blue Dragon Plus.
    "The universe is already mad. Anything else would be redundant."
    Twitter @FinalMacstorm
  • Anna Marie PrivitereAnna Marie Privitere Purr RPGamer Staff
    edited September 2009
    I'm not objecting to the coverage; I'd be a hypocrite to do so, especially since I'm playing to review King's Bounty myself. I see no reason why we're not covering PC strat RPGs, as we do cover their JP counterparts, often extensively -- we just usually don't.
  • MacstormMacstorm Ysy St. Administrators
    edited September 2009
    Yeah, we don't cover a lot of games because we just don't have the man power to do so. It just takes someone to come along with a passion to do it, but you know as much as I.
    "The universe is already mad. Anything else would be redundant."
    Twitter @FinalMacstorm
  • SandySandy Final Fanatic Full Members
    edited September 2009
    True, but this applies to all tactical RPGs this site covers, and I've pointed out to important staff people many times that the distinction between strategy games we cover and strategy games we don't is ridiculous. We should either cover all or none. For HoMM, my guess is that we cover it because it's an extension of the Might and Magic series more than anything gameplay related.
    It might be superficial, but the distinction I make with tactical RPGs and pure strategy games is that in the first you level up your troops and give them equipment and different abilities, while in strategy games you have troops with preset strengths and skills.

    So in tactical RPGs you have more freedom in developing your army, while in strategy games your army is preset, and you just aim to get the largest troops and strongest units in order to win.

    HoMM IV went more to the RPG side with the recruitable heroes with proper equipment (and not just artefacts), but you still won if you managed to get Black Dragons in that game as well. tounge2.gif

    Again, I'm glad that this series is covered here, and I agree it's a line drawn in water as to which games fit this site and which don't. The staff should cover those games that they feel comfortable covering under the "RPGamer" banner. wink.gif
  • 7thCircle7thCircle Proofer of the Realm RPGamer Staff
    edited September 2009
    But if a game is a pure tactics game, like Jagged Alliance, it won't be covered. The problem is that when you choose to cover Final Fantasy Tactics and call it an RPG, it opens the door for all tactical and strategy games. The mindset of people who make coverage decisions here is generally "If a strategy game is like FFT, it's covered. Otherwise it isn't." So to explain whether or not HoMM 5 is an RPG, it comes down to comparing it to FFT and a decade's worth of copycats. That's where discussions get silly and give coverage to every Japanese tactics game while passing over every western one. There's also the issue of finding someone to care. After Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War II came out, there was a general acceptance among the staff that it was indeed an RPG, but no one pushed to add coverage after the fact and no one could review it, so it wasn't added.

    Off the top of my head, Fallout Tactics is the only western tactical game I can think of that RPGamer covered, and I assume it was given a pass because it was a Fallout spinoff.
    The lesson here is that dreams inevitably lead to hideous implosions.
  • MacstormMacstorm Ysy St. Administrators
    edited September 2009
    There's also the issue of finding someone to care. After Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War II came out, there was a general acceptance among the staff that it was indeed an RPG, but no one pushed to add coverage after the fact and no one could review it, so it wasn't added.
    Two things. It's not that the decision makers automatically think Western = NOT RPG as much as the fact that the developers of the games doesn't consider them to be. A game with "RPG elements" could really be anything, but Fallout Tactics was labeled in places as a turn-based/real-time tactical RPG. I'm all for covering more games, but I want to be within limits as to not divide us up any more than we already are.

    We're covering lots of borderline stuff these days, not all Japanese either. Borderlands is developed in the US and is very non-traditional, but they don't just say this is a shooter with RPG elements, they call it an RPG shooter. Might and Magic: Clash of Heroes they call an RPG puzzle game. I agree with your logic that in practice games are simiilar and should count as well, but when we set precedents they lead to more and more that we should cover.

    As far as Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War II, it wasn't reviewed because no one played it to completion. If they had, it could have been reviewed as nothing was stopping it.
    "The universe is already mad. Anything else would be redundant."
    Twitter @FinalMacstorm
  • flamethrowerflamethrower Member Full Members
    edited September 2009
    Final Fantasy Tactics isn't an RPG? You have persistent characters whose levels improve throughout the game.

    Heroes of Might and Magic is less of an RPG. Your character's power is determined by both the strength of their army and their stats and abilities. The troops have preset stats and abilities which are modified by the hero's skills.

    For the campaign scenarios, only your character level is carried over from one scenario to the next. The level of heroes assisting the main character do not carry over.
  • 7thCircle7thCircle Proofer of the Realm RPGamer Staff
    edited September 2009
    Final Fantasy Tactics isn't an RPG? You have persistent characters whose levels improve throughout the game.

    Heroes of Might and Magic is less of an RPG. Your character's power is determined by both the strength of their army and their stats and abilities. The troops have preset stats and abilities which are modified by the hero's skills.

    For the campaign scenarios, only your character level is carried over from one scenario to the next. The level of heroes assisting the main character do not carry over.
    I see the "FFT as an RPG" thing as a self-fulfilling prophecy of sorts. If you hadn't been told for the last 10 years that it counts as an RPG, it wouldn't seem like common sense. If you were told in 1998 that it wasn't an RPG because it's a tactics game -- albeit, one that lets your characters level up outside of the stages -- you'd probably argue now that it not being an RPG is common sense.

    Mario is a character whose stats persist between stages. Is that an RPG? Persistent characters are just as much a platformer mechanic as they are an RPG mechanic. My stats in God of War persisted between stages, I gained experience, assigned skills, and my levels improved throughout the game. Common sense says that's an RPG too. Castle Crashers. All WWE games. Etc, etc. It doesn't make a game an RPG at all.

    As for HoMM, you are half right. Your abilities carry over between stages, as do the magic spells you learned and your character level. Your equipment and your army are the only things reset at the start of each mission. Saying that a persisent army of characters somehow makes a game an RPG goes back to my original point though. You are considering what FFT did and you are looking for other games that also do that. Then you declare that game an RPG too. Keeping a single, growing army for an entire game is more of a characteristic of tactical war games and the Civilization series -- games that are not RPGs.

    I've been arguing this for a while. I know where the holes are in any objective argument declaring Japanese tactics games to be RPGs and western tactics games to be sims or strategy games. You can't reason your way through it because it isn't a reasonable stance. It's best to stick to Sandy's "The staff should cover those games that they feel comfortable covering under the "RPGamer" banner." because that's the truth of the matter. Bring up the gameplay mechanics and you just end up sounding silly.
    The lesson here is that dreams inevitably lead to hideous implosions.
  • Phillip WillisPhillip Willis Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited September 2009
    I stopped by the board today to update my review blog. The last thing I expected to see was one of my beloved HOMM games being blogged for eventual review...with a full blown RPG or NOT discussion to go with it. Woot!

    I'm a huge HOMM fan. I played 2,3 and 4 to completion (though I did not make it through all of the expansions in 3 and 4.) I bought 2 and 3 on GoG, even though I already own them, just so I could play them on the fly without the CD (and play them on my netbook). I'm one of the few people that enjoyed 4. I've played 5. I agree with your sentiments so far. The difficulty starts out mind numbingly easy...and then spikes on ya when you least expect it. In one of the later boards, just when I though I was doing well, the computer kicked my tush. That was only 14 days in. I restarted. I died. Restart. Died. Rinse, repeat.

    I was beginning to think that the only way to beat that board was to start over and develop that carry-over hero a different way.

    HOMM V is the only game that I haven't completely beaten the original campaign. But, despite its drawbacks, I still like it. Yes, you're right that there's no detail on the characters, especially when they start talking. But I love the overall art direction and color saturation. Seeing HOMM favorites like the dragons, angels and other troops, in full 3-D with an anime style flare on them is a real treat to long time fans such as myself. It's a bit hard to recommend to others IMHO. I generally steer new players towards HOMM III, as it felt like the best overall package.

    On another note...I totally feel what you guys are saying about PC game reviews. I love PC games, and have a bit of a library. There's quite a few of them, such as the beforementioned DoW II, which I could go back, play and review. It just seems like there's always a new console game which needs more immediate attention. So, getting the time to play the PC games is tough. But if the demand is there, I can always stop console for a bit and go back and do some PC reviews biggrin.gif
    Co-Host on RPGBacktrack. Follow me on Twitter and sub to my blog if you would like!
  • 7thCircle7thCircle Proofer of the Realm RPGamer Staff
    edited September 2009
    Radeon HD 4870 > Integrated graphics

    *updated*
    The lesson here is that dreams inevitably lead to hideous implosions.
  • shoptrollshoptroll Have towel will travel Full Members
    edited September 2009
    Radeon HD 4870 > Integrated graphics
    That's an understatement if I ever saw one.

    Good to see some more Might & Magic coverage on the site smile.gif
    So long & thanks for all the fish!
  • flamethrowerflamethrower Member Full Members
    edited September 2009
    Quote: wrote:
    and based on the nerds I knew in college, a self-built PC has a 75% chance of melting sometime, somewhere
    Really? I have two self-built PCs and neither one has melted yet. One is four years old. A self built PC is like any other PC - when it's broke you take it to the repair shop and they fix it.
  • Anna Marie PrivitereAnna Marie Privitere Purr RPGamer Staff
    edited September 2009
    I blew one of (if not the) first computer I built for myself, but I've learned to be a lot more careful with my hair since then wink.gif
  • shoptrollshoptroll Have towel will travel Full Members
    edited September 2009
    Quote: wrote:
    and based on the nerds I knew in college, a self-built PC has a 75% chance of melting sometime, somewhere
    Really? I have two self-built PCs and neither one has melted yet. One is four years old. A self built PC is like any other PC - when it's broke you take it to the repair shop and they fix it.
    Early AMD processors, mainly the Athlons were notorious for running hot and melting if not properly cooled. AMD has since improved their chip designs so they don't run as hot as they used to, and apparently the stock coolers are at least adequate for most people.

    The operative thing to note here is "college students". People who often don't have much in terms of a budget and/or occassionally don't know exactly what they're doing. Some are probably recalling High School days, in which case raise the previous sentence by a factor of 10.

    Self built PCs are fine and dandy to take to the local repair shop. Unfortunately it'll probably cost you a lot of money since unlike OEM rigs they can't call up the OEM and get a licensed support technician to come and do the repair or replacement for free.

    However, after working in the college computer repair shop for 5 years, I will say that OEMs are not without trouble too. Dell GX260s got wallopped by the bad Chinese capacitor incident in the mid 2000's which hit almost every system manufacturer out there.

    I've built 2 computers so far. First one died after about 4 years in due to a motherboard capacitor rupturing. The replacement mobo I got off eBay magically died about 3 weeks later. The successor is still going strong after 4.5 years with no hardware trouble to speak of. I'm looking forward to building its heir at the end of October biggrin.gif

    EDIT: Now I remember why I stopped by this thread again. Glenn, if you haven't already, you should check out this fan made manual if you already haven't:

    http://www.heroesofmightandmagic.com/heroes5/game_manuals.shtml



    So long & thanks for all the fish!
  • EmeraldSuzakuEmeraldSuzaku Member Full Members
    edited September 2009
    Ah, yes, the fan made manual. Because for whatever reason the game couldn't ship with anything resembling a decent one. If it wasn't such an awesome game....
  • 7thCircle7thCircle Proofer of the Realm RPGamer Staff
    edited September 2009
    Whoa that manual is exactly what Ubisoft was too cheap to include with the game. Who makes a strategy game and doesn't provide the player information on spells, skills, or units? The complete skill list with prerequisites in the fan manual is crucial.

    I'm not going to say my college friends were bad nerds, but I can clearly recall every one having issues with a self-built desktop at some point, and like shoptroll said, these issues tended to involve overheating. I did have one friend who built a PC, then later decided he didn't put enough slime (I'm not a technical guy) between the processor and the heatsink. So he bought more slime, took off the heatsink, added slime, and this time when he snapped the fan back on he chipped the processor and claimed his computer never worked at 100% again. I had a friend's PSU melt freshman year. Another friend sophomore year seemed to have a PC that broke all the time. He blamed the fact that he had four operating systems installed and they didn't like each other. The people I knew with OEM desktops and laptops never had any issues with them.
    The lesson here is that dreams inevitably lead to hideous implosions.
  • shoptrollshoptroll Have towel will travel Full Members
    edited September 2009
    Whoa that manual is exactly what Ubisoft was too cheap to include with the game. Who makes a strategy game and doesn't provide the player information on spells, skills, or units? The complete skill list with prerequisites in the fan manual is crucial.

    I'm not going to say my college friends were bad nerds, but I can clearly recall every one having issues with a self-built desktop at some point, and like shoptroll said, these issues tended to involve overheating. I did have one friend who built a PC, then later decided he didn't put enough slime (I'm not a technical guy) between the processor and the heatsink. So he bought more slime, took off the heatsink, added slime, and this time when he snapped the fan back on he chipped the processor and claimed his computer never worked at 100% again. I had a friend's PSU melt freshman year. Another friend sophomore year seemed to have a PC that broke all the time. He blamed the fact that he had four operating systems installed and they didn't like each other. The people I knew with OEM desktops and laptops never had any issues with them.
    There's a lot to be said about the development of HoMMV that could've been improved. If I recall right it's one of the few games where the fans petitioned for a longer development time. Not to mention the numerous features that had to be patched in that were pretty much standard in previous iterations. It's downright amazing that Nival and Ubisoft were willing to keep supporting the game for as long as they did, given the number of companies these days that just drop the game on the public, collect their money and don't bother to do basic patching for them.

    At risk of furthering the threadjack... More thermal grease (aka "slime") can be the solution but it's one of those things where too much makes the problem worse. Unfortunately if you chip the chip you don't get a good contact between the grease, chip and heatsink which could cause thermal problems. I've seen PSU's do weird things (the first one in my first homebuilt rig died after a couple years in addition to scorching the plastic guides for the connectors) and that really comes down to quality control. Not all PSUs are created equal, which makes them a part you really want to do research on before you buy one. I'm curious as to what OSes the other guy had. I can't see a need to run 4 of them, unless you're really into comparing various Linux distros for whatever reason. But 4 hard drive partitions should solve any "infighting" that might be occuring. Unless they each like to overwrite the boot loader.
    So long & thanks for all the fish!
  • 7thCircle7thCircle Proofer of the Realm RPGamer Staff
    edited September 2009
    It was when XP just came out, so he had XP, Linux, Unix, and whatever previous version of Windows he was using all installed at once across a few partitions.
    The lesson here is that dreams inevitably lead to hideous implosions.
  • Phillip WillisPhillip Willis Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited September 2009
    Radeon HD 4870 > Integrated graphics

    *updated*
    LOLZZZZ!!

    I inlove.gif my 4870 card. It roxxs!
    Co-Host on RPGBacktrack. Follow me on Twitter and sub to my blog if you would like!
  • MacstormMacstorm Ysy St. Administrators
    edited September 2009
    I blew one of (if not the) first computer I built for myself, but I've learned to be a lot more careful with my hair since then wink.gif
    And teeth. Always watch the teeth.
    "The universe is already mad. Anything else would be redundant."
    Twitter @FinalMacstorm
  • shoptrollshoptroll Have towel will travel Full Members
    edited September 2009
    I inlove.gif my 4870 card. It roxxs!
    I'm looking at either a 4870 or 4890 as part of my upgrade. Although I'm curious about the 5850 and 5870 that are due out in the coming weeks. If anything they'll drive down the 4870/4890 prices again and make them even more desirable smile.gif

    (My poor 6600GT can barely handle newish games)

    EDIT: How hot does the 4870 run?



    So long & thanks for all the fish!
  • Phillip WillisPhillip Willis Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited September 2009
    It's a big card...but it doesn't seem to run too hot. It doesn't hurt that it has a really huge fan to keep it cool. I have a large case with good ventilation, so I'm sure that helps as well. It is a huge improvement over my 8000 series card, so I'm sure it will be a gigantic step up from your 6600! Best part is, it's relatively cheap. I remember right before this card came out...the closest thing you could get, I think, was a 260 or 280 (Nvidia) and it ran like twice the price or more of the 4870's new price when it came out!
    Co-Host on RPGBacktrack. Follow me on Twitter and sub to my blog if you would like!
  • valsarvalsar Member Full Members
    edited September 2009
    I suppose this is a good spot to ask this question since it has everything to do with HoMMV, but do you think that the collectors edition to this game is worth 30 bucks? I'm tempted to pick it up but my only experience with the series has been a couple of hot seat games of HoMM3 which I enjoyed.
  • Phillip WillisPhillip Willis Certified Polygameist RPGamer Staff
    edited September 2009
    Hmmm...I could only find the "Complete" edition here for about $20 http://www.amazon.com/Heroes-....&sr=8-3

    If you have a link to the "collector's," paste it here and I'll look at it. I will say, though, for $20, getting the whole HOMMV is a great deal. I paid a lot more than that tounge2.gif

    Drat.
    Co-Host on RPGBacktrack. Follow me on Twitter and sub to my blog if you would like!
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