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Watch any good movies lately?

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  • IndineraIndinera Member Full Members
    edited October 2011
    I like Urban Legend, especially the part when the blonde girl is trapped (alone) in the school radio offices. Also the part when some of the main characters escape through the fields and end up bumping into the janitor's car on the road. Very suspenseful. The ending is not so good but overall it's a movie I really enjoyed.
    Owner of Aldorlea Games
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  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited October 2011
    The part when Tara Reid was trapped is ... okay. Nothing more. There was no real suspense about whether she'd survive, and thus it just became a long-running death scene which wasn't particularly impressive save as yet another demonstration of how killers are able to move faster than anyone else despite never raising their speed above a mild walk. Maybe it was my not caring about Alicia Witt in the slightest, maybe the script that was trying to be Scream, I didn't care for the movie.
    Next. A mediocre Philip K. Dick adaptation, stop the presses! Truth be told I watched this with Rifftrax, and the movie never made me think that was a bad idea. Nicholas Cage is a man who goes by more than one name, though his stage magician moniker of Frank Cadillac works well enough. He's got the ability to see two minutes into the future and uses it to get out of a Vegas casino after he attracted attention. Julianne Moore's FBI agent wants him to help nab some terrorists who have smuggled a nuclear weapon into the LA area. Cage's future sense is extended in the case of Jessica Biel's Liz, for reasons that the plot makes use of but never explains.
    Hope you like seeing how things transpired, then rewinding in order to see them transpire again, because that's the major method used to convey happenings. It works a lot of the time, admittedly, but the screenplay just gets haphazard as things go along. Moore's character isn't given enough background to come alive, and Biel's character REALLY isn't given enough background. As for Cage, he's in low-key mode throughout, so those hoping for some of his amazingly crazy antics will be disappointed. A CGI train and nuclear blast look really fake, though Lee Tamahori directs matters pretty well during the action sequences, except for the gigantic leaps in logic that the audience is not dragged along with. The terrorists in particular are given no distinguishing characteristics whatsoever, so they're pretty bland. Mediocre, not much more.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited October 2011
    I really liked Next myself. Just watched a flick called The Ledge. Terrible. Just terrible, don't bother with it despite how interesting the premise sounds.
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • IndineraIndinera Member Full Members
    edited October 2011
    I've seen Friday the 13th Part 4 yesterday. It was nice, great suspense and horror, plus it never gets boring because the movie is somewhat fast-paced (this whole series is, to be fair). I think I prefer the 3rd one which I saw a couple weeks earlier.
    Owner of Aldorlea Games
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  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited October 2011
    You just used 'great suspense and horror' to refer to Friday the 13th. As you will. I have seen every one of those movies more than once, and not one of them ever achieved either with me. Pt 2 came closest, Pt 4 I remember for Crispin Glover doing a goofy dance, Pt 3 I remember for all the 3D effects that fail miserably.
    The Abyss. James Cameron had a hot streak for awhile there, and while this movie didn't seem to fit when it came out in theaters, the director's cut (back when those were a new thing) made clear that this is a triumph. The scenario starts with the bang of a US nuclear submarine being waylaid by something underwater that causes it to slam into a rock shelf, busting the hatches and leaving it 2,000 feet underwater. It's a matter of timing, so a test deep-water drilling facility led by Bud (Ed Harris) is ordered by their company to shift over and investigate the wreck, accompanied by Bud's estranged wife who designed the drilling facility Liz (Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio) and a group of Navy SEALs led by Lt. Coffey (Michael Biehn). As they're operating 1700 feet down, adjusting to the pressure is mandatory, and Lt. Coffey is having issues with that right from the start, but he hides it for awhile. The crew of the drill rig grumbles quite a bit at first, then more as they end up watching over a submarine with seemingly no survivors, but what really hits the fan is when the thing that originally caused the submarine to go out of control comes back. Only Liz gets a good look at it, Coffey takes her description as something the Reds have (it WAS made in 1989), and under orders from the top the SEALs grab one of the Trident nuclear warheads from the submarine just as a hurricane comes along on the surface, knocking the crane that links the surface and seabed loose and wrecking half the drill rig as it's tossed around at the beck and call of the waves above.
    Describing what happens is fun, since there's a lot going on, but the central element of this movie is the rekindled love between Bud and Liz. They start sniping at each other constantly, adapting back to a professional workaday level, then obviously feeling more. It takes the well-known scene of Bud doing everything in his power to drag Liz back from death ("You never backed away from anything in your life!") and the touching scene of Bud dropping into the eponymous thousands-of-feet-down ocean real estate in order to save all their lives while Liz talks him through it to make clear that these two really do have something special.
    The effects are uniformly great. Cameron filmed this on locations closely resembling the ones depicted, though not 1700 feet below the ocean surface. The aliens remind me of Close Encounters of the Third Kind underwater. It says something that the one use of CGI, which was in its infancy at the time, looks better than half the movies which use it today. The actors were put through the wringer on multiple occasions, staying cold and drenched for hours at a time. The director's cut added about half an hour of footage back, and while I don't remember the theatrical version offhand, I readily accept that it is inferior in pretty much every way. When action happens, it's legitimately exciting and pulse-elevating. The dialogue mostly serves its purpose and nothing more, but is well-delivered, and the characters are fully believable. The climax does drain some of the excitement away in favor of a resolution that's been seen in a lot of science fiction over the years, but it stays involving nevertheless.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • IndineraIndinera Member Full Members
    edited October 2011
    Pt3 is an enjoyable movie I would say, I only learned about the 3D effects after seeing the movie actually (but it all added up once I knew because indeed there were many scenes where you could see they were pushing it with those effects - the yoyo, the eyeball etc.). Pt4 is not as good as Pt3 to me, but still a worthy addition. Besides it's quite nice that Pt1 to 4 all follow each other.
    What is a "great suspense and horror" for you?
    Owner of Aldorlea Games
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  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited October 2011
    I'll come up with a few. Sifting through the many lousy horror movies over the years is challenging, but it can be done. I'll exclude the Universal stuff from the 30s, not because it's bad, but because 'horror' has changed over the years, and those movies are actually well-regarded by even critics nowadays. Nosferatu, The Phantom of the Opera (1925), Dracula (1931), Frankenstein (1931), Bride of Frankenstein, and Invisible Man all come to mind as really strong movies from that period though. I'd come up with more if I wasn't in a hurry. I also mostly leave the Hammer horror aside, because I didn't find it frightening, though it's plenty enjoyable for other reasons. The Devil's Bride would easily count if I was counting Hammer stuff though.
    Night of the Demon. Goes by several names, you're after a movie in which Dana Andrews is a hard skeptic with regard to anything supernatural, but eventually is forced to believe because there's no other explanation for what's happening to him. The demon only appears at the beginning and end, thus allowing suspense to reign.
    The Haunting (1963). The remake really is garbage. Robert Wise crafted a superb movie in which you never see anything at all, except for a door pushing in that could be a fake from a woman whose mental state is being strained to the limit. Gripping and unforgettable.
    Halloween. I watched it again earlier this month, and it really does hold up. Laurie's friends aren't brilliant by any means, but they're believable teenage girls, and not complete morons (totally gets overused as a slang expression, I'd concede). Again, less is more. Except with regard to the score, John Carpenter crafted an iconic one.
    The Thing (1982). Properly I should say The Thing From Another World is up there too, because it is. Anyone who's seen this knows what I'm talking about when I say it keeps the tension going and never lets up.
    I could mention a few other effective John Carpenter movies like Prince of Darkness and (in some ways) In the Mouth of Madness.
    Alien. Another self-explanatory one to those who've seen it, the face that I'd seen the movie before and STILL jumped a bit when its director's cut was in the theater in 2003 says a lot.
    Something recent? Okay, Paranormal Activity gave me a creepy feeling that night. Insidious opened up to some weirdness near the end but was quite effective in the early going. The Mist worked for me, complete with the nihilistic ending that was most definitely not what studios would want (the CGI wasn't very good though).
    Don't get me wrong, I like a lot of movies that fall into the horror genre, but not because they frighten me. They rarely do. I enjoy some of the Friday the 13th movies for the simple pleasure of seeing Jason making the kills, but even as a little kid they didn't scare me.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • Adriaan den OudenAdriaan den Ouden Δ Hidden Forbidden Holy Ground RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2011
    JuMeSyn wrote: »
    I'll come up with a few. Sifting through the many lousy horror movies over the years is challenging, but it can be done. I'll exclude the Universal stuff from the 30s, not because it's bad, but because 'horror' has changed over the years, and those movies are actually well-regarded by even critics nowadays. Nosferatu, The Phantom of the Opera (1925), Dracula (1931), Frankenstein (1931), Bride of Frankenstein, and Invisible Man all come to mind as really strong movies from that period though. I'd come up with more if I wasn't in a hurry. I also mostly leave the Hammer horror aside, because I didn't find it frightening, though it's plenty enjoyable for other reasons. The Devil's Bride would easily count if I was counting Hammer stuff though.
    Night of the Demon. Goes by several names, you're after a movie in which Dana Andrews is a hard skeptic with regard to anything supernatural, but eventually is forced to believe because there's no other explanation for what's happening to him. The demon only appears at the beginning and end, thus allowing suspense to reign.
    The Haunting (1963). The remake really is garbage. Robert Wise crafted a superb movie in which you never see anything at all, except for a door pushing in that could be a fake from a woman whose mental state is being strained to the limit. Gripping and unforgettable.
    Halloween. I watched it again earlier this month, and it really does hold up. Laurie's friends aren't brilliant by any means, but they're believable teenage girls, and not complete morons (totally gets overused as a slang expression, I'd concede). Again, less is more. Except with regard to the score, John Carpenter crafted an iconic one.
    The Thing (1982). Properly I should say The Thing From Another World is up there too, because it is. Anyone who's seen this knows what I'm talking about when I say it keeps the tension going and never lets up.
    I could mention a few other effective John Carpenter movies like Prince of Darkness and (in some ways) In the Mouth of Madness.
    Alien. Another self-explanatory one to those who've seen it, the face that I'd seen the movie before and STILL jumped a bit when its director's cut was in the theater in 2003 says a lot.
    Something recent? Okay, Paranormal Activity gave me a creepy feeling that night. Insidious opened up to some weirdness near the end but was quite effective in the early going. The Mist worked for me, complete with the nihilistic ending that was most definitely not what studios would want (the CGI wasn't very good though).
    Don't get me wrong, I like a lot of movies that fall into the horror genre, but not because they frighten me. They rarely do. I enjoy some of the Friday the 13th movies for the simple pleasure of seeing Jason making the kills, but even as a little kid they didn't scare me.

    Let me throw my own suggestions in there, if we're talking horror.

    1408 with John Cusack and Samuel L. Jackson is, I think, the best adaptation of a Stephen King story to date. It's gripping, creepy, and John Cusack basically puts on a one-man show.

    Poltergeist is another great one, and I like to hold it up as proof that you don't need a lot of guts and gore to make a movie scary (it was rated PG)

    Hallowe'en (2007), since you already mentioned the John Carpenter original. This is one of the few times when I thought the remake was better than the original.
    Maybe I'll log out and check my e-mail or something...
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited October 2011
    I hate Poltergeist. The characters are such unbelievable morons that I can't look at it as anything other than a technical showcase. The effects are great, I hate the people involved.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited October 2011
    1408 is highly underrated, I watch that flick like once a month, as well as The Mist. The Thing is a great example of great suspense and horror. Halloween? Insidious? You serious Jumesyn?
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited October 2011
    About Halloween, yes I am. Insidious wasn't a complete hit by any stretch but it began pretty well.
    I forgot to credit The Descent. Another good one from recent years.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • IndineraIndinera Member Full Members
    edited October 2011
    I think "best horror movie" is not the same as "most suspenseful" or "scarier"...

    Best:
    Jaws
    Deep Rising
    Wrong Turn
    The Ring
    Les Diaboliques (not really horror, but bleh)
    Hellraiser

    and there are literally 10's and 10's of other horror movies I love (could say I'm a die-hard fan of the genre).

    In your selection I really like The Thing and Alien, but it seems to me you have a thing for slow-paced movies. Halloween I find it hard to go through entirely, very boring imo.

    Most suspenseful/Scarier:
    Very hard for me to remember that... as an adult I don't usually get scared easily.
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  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited October 2011
    Leaving out Jaws was a mistake on my part, I'd agree with that one completely.
    If you find Halloween very boring, I obviously can't change your mind, except to say that I wholly disagree.
    My only experience with a Hellraiser movie (might have been the original, can't remember) was years ago and left me puzzled and dissatisfied. Still, don't take that for much, as it was back in the mid-90s and I remember almost nothing.
    As for pacing, I watch all kinds of movies in every genre. If I find a movie boring, it's likely you'd leave the room real fast. Something like Land of the Pharaohs or So Big (1953) struggles to leave a mark in my mind, but I definitely watched them all the way through (a more modern example would be The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, which definitely bored me at many points). Movies that just constantly throw things at me and never let me catch my breath CAN work, but usually don't. That's why I'm able to take movies other people deem overly talky and not be bothered. Sure, it's uninteresting, but my standards are apparently unusual in that regard. Now I feel like watching In the Bedroom....

    One thing on which we can all agree: the remake of Black Christmas was one of the worst things ever created.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • IndineraIndinera Member Full Members
    edited October 2011
    Yeah I did not like it much (Black Christmas) and yet I'm very easy with horror movies. I thought it was one of the less interesting "modern" horror movie by far.
    Old stuff is cool too - like The Omen (which is excellent), The American Werewolf in London (awesome), Carrie, Christine, The Thing, Predator and so on (probably a lot I'm forgetting). But Halloween had bored me, yup, maybe I should rewatch it to assess this memory. I find Friday the 13th much more entertaining than Halloween in general. I did watch Halloween 2 and I still think it's inferior to Friday the 13th.
    I'm currently watching Frozen (stupid internet connection went off so I have to reload it), it's pretty nice so far, reminds me of survival horror like Open Waters 2.

    PS: got any love for Waxworks? Thought it was a really nice little flick
    Owner of Aldorlea Games
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  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited October 2011
    Watch me derail the conversation by talking about Crossroads. Yeah, THAT Crossroads, the one with everyone's favorite teen singer of the late 90s and early 00s. I expect everyone who reads this to talk about nothing else, because it's scarier than most other movies I could name.
    Oh, I didn't watch it unaided. There's a Rifftrax for it, and a very helpful thing it is. The movie isn't even as horrible as some I've seen, though I'd never try to claim it's any variety of good. Lots of gigantic miscalculations are rampant. This shows how low poor Dan Akroyd's career has fallen, playing Britney Spears' dad. Zoe Saldana shows none of the charisma she'd later display in some recent movies, though to be fair this is a character (snooty super-posh drama queen trying to find her boyfriend/fiancee across the country) nobody could turn into something likable. Kim Cattrall has exactly one scene as Britney's mother and is thoroughly unremarkable with her three minutes of screen time, and then there's Britney herself. Well - she didn't make me want to claw my eyes out at every moment. As an actress she's (to be charitable) unimpressive, and her offscreen baggage is such that buying her as the class valedictorian is absolutely hilarious. Many scenes are so ludicrous as to destroy any hope of a coherent narrative, most prominently the one where three unknown women get to take all the time they need in a karaoke talent show, then totally wow the crowd with their empty cover of "I Love Rock & Roll" which will in no way erase memories of Joan Jett. Jason Biggs is there in the beginning as Britney's boyfriend, but he gets tossed aside and never mentioned again throughout. The insane decision to go into Lifetime movie territory with a pregnant woman falling down the stairs and losing the baby is completely ill-placed in this vacuous movie.
    There's your sample. Watch it, you know you want to!
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • Adriaan den OudenAdriaan den Ouden Δ Hidden Forbidden Holy Ground RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2011
    Wow, how could I forget Jaws? Now I feel dumb. Then again, I haven't seen the movie in years. I had a copy on VHS years and years ago but I've yet to pick up a DVD/Blu-Ray replacement. I should really get one, that's a real classic.

    If we go to some less traditional fare, I'd also recommend The Others. Brilliantly suspenseful and some of the best use of sound in any film ever. And for the heck of it, Jurassic Park. True, most of it is an action film, but there are a few sections there that are really creepy (the stuff with the raptors near the end, for example)
    Maybe I'll log out and check my e-mail or something...
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited October 2011
    Not taking up my challenge to think about Crossroads, Omega? I suppose I can't blame you, but it is scarier to contemplate than a lot of things.
    While I'm thinking on movies that DO fit the October mindset, I thought Signs was actually quite creepy. It's been nine years so I might not still think so, but at the time it was the only Shyamalan movie I'd seen (having since hurt myself with the Village and the Happening, plus finding that I disagree with all the people who sent The Sixth Sense to the top).
    I remember thinking Wolf Creek was pretty good too, though again it's been awhile.
    Duel is one of the most intense things Spielberg ever made, and that's saying something. Not really horror, but for turning the scenario of a man being pursued by a sinister big rig truck into something that doesn't drag at all, it's top-notch.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • NergalNergal The Don Full Members
    edited October 2011
    Not that big into horror. I haven't seen much in the genre that's legitimately "creepy" or "scary" (relying on jump scares and gorn just doesn't cut it I'm afraid). Wolf Creek is serious paranoia fuel though. I remember me and my wife being scared witless in our last camping trip out bush whenever vans drove past :P

    The Ring gave me the chills when I was younger. Strangely, I didn't find the original Ringu anywhere near as chilling.

    Best "horror" movie is and always will be The Shining. My wife prefers the book, but I swear by the film. Not really scary as much as unnerving, but the film itself is astonishing well-crafted.
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited October 2011
    Nuts. I did forget the Shining, and I shouldn't. Stanley Kubrick's cold touch was just what this needed to become something eerie and unnerving. Having just rediscovered it (a little kid isn't well-equipped for the topic, which is what I was last time I saw the thing), David Cronenberg's The Fly (1986) might warrant inclusion. It's kinda gross in a few parts (Cronenberg movies always seem to be from my experience) but affecting and creepy too.
    I can't say my expectations were very high, and that's good, because The Thing (2011) sure didn't meet them. Part of the problem is how explicitly the movie tries to set itself up as a prequel to John Carpenter's movie, and for that reason lots of things which I wouldn't have minded as much in another context just stick out glaringly here. Anyway, synopsis time:
    A trio of Norwegians in Antarctica is off to find something in the ice, which they do the hard way, by lodging their Snowcat quite a long way down an ice ravine. What they find prompts the recruitment of an American paleontologist with experience in cold digs (Mary Elizabeth Winstead), and she's whisked to the Norwegian camp in order to help excavate a survivor of a spaceship that is embedded in the Antarctic ice. From there, things progress remarkably as one might expect, based on the earlier version of this story.
    This version may not be inspired much by Howard Hawks' The Thing From Another World, but it includes at least one unmistakable homage to it, only in this case the Thing that leaps out of the ice block melted its way through... by magic? I dunno, the room made people's breath smoke and no forgetful sentry put an electric blanket over, so how it melted enough to let the Thing out is bizarre. Another homage might be when a flaming Thing runs through a door, but since that scene was cut short in the Howard Hawks movie by the Thing leaping through a window, it's another misfire.
    As for comparisons with John Carpenter's movie, they're everywhere, and that's a big problem. The Thing apparently got a LOT smarter for his movie, because it's quite stupid here. The most blatant instance of it being a moron is when it inexplicably flips out on a helicopter and causes the thing to crash, which removes a very convenient means of escape and makes no sense because it was under no suspicion at the time. Other moments are unfortunately prolific when The Thing is stupid, such as when Winstead has been isolated and is subjected to a fairly lengthy transformation prior to being incapacitated, time which she uses wisely. The Thing doesn't really try to hide in this movie, preferring to flip out and rip people to shreds the instant it's uncovered, so forget about any attempt to build suspense by wondering who's really human - there ARE imitations running around, but they don't hide themselves much. It's a creature feature instead of a suspense machine.
    John Carpenter's movie rationed out character moments well, but each person in the American base definitely had a personality. Not so here, where a few people (Winstead and another woman are notable for being the women, the professor who hired Winstead is notable for being a smug jerk, Lars is notable for having a flamethrower and being aggressive with it, and Joel Edgerton is notable for being the only other actor with a credit I remember other than this movie) are capable of standing out and everyone else just blends together as anonymous fodder.
    Then there's the Thing itself. Occasionally the CGI used to create it looks adequate, but most of the time, it's pretty obvious. I've seen worse CGI, but I've also seen better, and the effects of John Carpenter's movie were substantially better. The abilities of the Thing are inconsistent, since it's able to slam a tentacle through some guy near the beginning but somehow loses that aspect later. Cutting it into pieces seems to make each one a separate entity, which would be a useful ability, but the Thing chooses to put itself back together instead of following through with splitting into many pieces and swarming the opposition. A new wrinkle has been introduced in the form of the Thing being unable to accommodate inorganic things, which leads to a decent version of the famed 'test' from Carpenter's movie, this one involving the search for fillings. Still, it's odd that leaving pieces of metal behind would never come up again in that movie. The absorption/imitation process has also gotten a lot messier, based on the amount of blood left behind when The Thing does it. Again, it must've learned not to do that come Carpenter's movie.
    In a very bad decision, Ennio Morricone's iconic score from the 1982 movie is only used at the very end. The generic horror music heard the rest of the time is forgettable, which it should not be.
    Several items are clearly meant to lead into Carpenter's movie directly. For instance, the two-headed thing in the Norwegian camp is explained - in a very stupid way, that of the Thing adjoining with some guy and then never completing the process, choosing to crawl around like that for a good ten minutes before being dispatched. Oddly, the video being watched in Carpenter's movie is never seen being filmed, and how the Norwegians managed to close their arms in a circle around the spaceship is never explained given that the vehicle is buried deep beneath the ice. Clearly it wasn't buried because of a problem though, because the machine is activated by the Thing in the climax of this movie (spoilers? Yeah, probably. Too bad) in preparation for... flying elsewhere on Earth? Back to space? Who knows, I sure don't. Over the credits is the only time Morricone's music is featured, as it leads directly into the first scene of Carpenter's movie by showing two Norwegians (one of whom, a guy never seen before appeared out of nowhere with a helicopter in order to properly set things up). Oh, and apparently a Russian camp was located 50 miles from the Norwegians. Funny how no one mentioned that in Carpenter's movie....
    I don't even really despise this movie, but it sure is a massive letdown to anyone who holds up the 1982 movie as a beacon of good things. Matthijs van Heijningen Jr, this is what you turned out on your first feature effort at directing? Nope, don't like it.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • IndineraIndinera Member Full Members
    edited October 2011
    Wolf Creek is one of my favorite, too. By the same director, you can try Rogue, which is kinda Jaws with a crocodile.
    As for The Fly, I thought it was good, but not so intense, and with an ending that could be better. You may want to try The Black Fly from the 60's which is more suspense/mystery than horror and an excellent movie IMO. Plus the ending has a nice little twist.
    Another one worth watching is Eden Lake. The acting is good and the movie very intense.
    Owner of Aldorlea Games
    ~ Old-school RPGs for your PC ~
    Games Released: Laxius Force - 3 Stars of Destiny - Laxius Force II - Millennium - Asguaard - Millennium 2 - Dreamscape - Laxius Force III - Millennium 3 - Sylia - Millennium 4
    Coming Soon: The Book of Legends - Little Hearts
  • Sharkey360Sharkey360 Member Full Members
    edited October 2011
    Night of the Living Dead from 1968 is still engaging and horrifying to watch until now. It's a classic worth watching all over again.
  • Adriaan den OudenAdriaan den Ouden Δ Hidden Forbidden Holy Ground RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2011
    There are a lot of great horror-themed movies that aren't really scary, but terrific none the less. The Zombie genre has a bunch of them, three of which I absolutely adore. Shaun of the Dead of course, which I suspect most of you have seen, and Zombieland which depressingly didn't get made into a television series, because it would have been terrific as one. The last one is Fido, which is a small indie film starring Billy Connolly as the zombie pet of a small boy in a 50's-styled suburban paradise... with zombies of course. In this movie, the zombie war is over and people have started to rebuild. A company called ZomCom invents a special collar that turns zombies docile, making them perfect for cheap labor or as domestic servants. If you haven't seen it, I definitely recommend it. It's a clever spoof of both zombie movies and 1950's television and culture.
    Maybe I'll log out and check my e-mail or something...
  • IndineraIndinera Member Full Members
    edited October 2011
    In the zombie genre, among all the movies I've seen, my favorites are 28 Days Later and the remake of Dawn of the Dead. I'm not too hot about Romero's stuff, although I do like "Day of the Dead", for me the best of his trilogy. In particular, the ending sequence is really stunning!
    Owner of Aldorlea Games
    ~ Old-school RPGs for your PC ~
    Games Released: Laxius Force - 3 Stars of Destiny - Laxius Force II - Millennium - Asguaard - Millennium 2 - Dreamscape - Laxius Force III - Millennium 3 - Sylia - Millennium 4
    Coming Soon: The Book of Legends - Little Hearts
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited October 2011
    I liked Day of the Dead the least of the Romero movies I've seen, and actually agree with what Ebert said in his review: "(y)ou might assume that it would be impossible to steal a scene from a zombie, especially one with blood dripping from his orifices, but you haven't seen the overacting in this movie."
    Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. It took guts for Johnny Depp (back before he was constantly the darling of the paparazzi) to play Hunter S. Thompson in a nonstop drug binge movie. Terry Gilliam directs it well, if the mission was to make something consistently ugly and repellent. It's one of those mostly-plotless movies that just finds a couple of guys (Depp and Benicio del Toro, looking and acting extremely nasty) in Vegas on a variety of drugs. The soundtrack sure does make it sound like the late 60s, though 1971 still works. There will be no character growth or change in this movie, no major happenings except the amazingly tolerant people in Vegas hotels who don't complain about all the loud music and things moving around in certain suites occupied by crazy strung-out guys. Many varieties of drug episodes occur, the two leads act like guys on drugs by heedlessly barging around everywhere, cameos abound (Tobey Maguire looks weird in a blonde wig, Christina Ricci acts weird as a girl painting variations on Barbra Streisand, Garey Busey might have been gay as a policeman going after Depp on the road), and the whole thing really doesn't seem to have a conventional structure. Most of its events could be snipped and put anywhere in the running time, many of them have no real point except to be off-putting, and the pervasive unattractiveness makes this a baffling sit.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • IndineraIndinera Member Full Members
    edited October 2011
    All of Romero's work pales in comparison to 28 Days Later anyway, at least to me. And the remake of Dawn had good actors and was packed with action (this action so terribly lacking in Romero's trilogy).
    I still have to see 28 Weeks Later but I've heard good things about it.
    Owner of Aldorlea Games
    ~ Old-school RPGs for your PC ~
    Games Released: Laxius Force - 3 Stars of Destiny - Laxius Force II - Millennium - Asguaard - Millennium 2 - Dreamscape - Laxius Force III - Millennium 3 - Sylia - Millennium 4
    Coming Soon: The Book of Legends - Little Hearts
  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited October 2011
    28 Days Later is a modern classic. Went and saw "In Time." Awesome flick, a bit superficial and full of cliches but still awesome.
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • Adriaan den OudenAdriaan den Ouden Δ Hidden Forbidden Holy Ground RPGamer Staff
    edited October 2011
    I just picked up copies of Good Morning Vietnam and Full Metal Jacket on the cheap. The former is utterly terrific in every way. Robin Williams is fantastic in one of his rarer adult roles, and the film paints an interesting picture of the Vietnam war you usually don't see, namely its effects on the populated areas of Vietnam not in the middle of the battleground (in this case, Saigon). The latter is bizarre and disturbing in a way that only Stanley Kubrick seems capable of pulling off, but still an interesting film. Similar in a lot of ways to the more recent film Jarhead, which looked at Desert Storm.
    Maybe I'll log out and check my e-mail or something...
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited November 2011
    I think I'd seen the ending of The Sure Thing on TV at some point, but seeing the entirety of the movie was necessary to get it (as should always be the case, frankly). Rob Reiner's second directorial effort isn't the equal of his first (a This is Spinal Tap poster on a dorm room wall reminds one of this even if the association wasn't already made), but good romantic comedies are worth seeing, and this is one. John Cusack is good, as in most everything I've seen him do, Daphne Zuniga is also pretty good, Anthony Edwards has so much hair I barely recognized him, and the two stars click pretty well. Lots of 80s tunes on the soundtrack that are enjoyable, a solid script that doesn't require stupid break-ups (by the standards of romantic comedies, anyway), and good pacing. Romantic comedies rarely try to be anything more than successful, and this one works in its aim, so it's a good time.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • IndineraIndinera Member Full Members
    edited November 2011
    I watched Halloween H20 and I will probably rewatch the original soon as well.
    H20 is okay and entertaining, but doesn't break new grounds. Also the body count is a bit low for this kind of movie. But my main gripe would be the ending part. First, I find it extremely cheap how that stupid janitor stops her from stabbing him "dead for sure". Then, her sudden reaction to drive away with the car and Michael in it is a bit too mad to my taste. If it hadn't been for extreme luck (for instance when the car falls into the chasm), she would have been killed, probably Michael would have survived and come back to finish the job with her son - kinda lame, huh. But I liked how she chops his head off at last (well until Halloween Resurrection transforms this scene into a retarded twist, thanks retcon effect).
    Owner of Aldorlea Games
    ~ Old-school RPGs for your PC ~
    Games Released: Laxius Force - 3 Stars of Destiny - Laxius Force II - Millennium - Asguaard - Millennium 2 - Dreamscape - Laxius Force III - Millennium 3 - Sylia - Millennium 4
    Coming Soon: The Book of Legends - Little Hearts
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited November 2011
    Frenzy. This was Hitchcock's penultimate film, and it's a blast. Admittedly I haven't seen the reputedly-staid trio of Marnie, Torn Curtain and Topaz that he closed the 60s with, but Frenzy shows that the Master of Suspense was still trying new things even after almost 50 years in the business. Its story isn't anything new for him: a man named Richard has just had a lousy day, getting fired from his barman job and then missing a 20-1 horse at the races for lack of money. He attempts to reconcile with the ex-wife he hasn't seen in over a year, only to get into a heated row with her before calming down again and accepting her offer of a dinner out. Then he's off to meet her at work the next day, but he happens to arrive just after the Necktie Strangler has been at it again, leaving his ex dead and viciously raped when another employee witnessed the excitability of the man the previous day. Classic innocent man falsely accused scenario, just like many other Hitchcock movies. What sets this one apart is the freedom the Production Code's end allows Hitch to have in displaying certain things more overtly than he ever could have during his most prolific years. The rape scene leaves very little to the imagination, and the strangling immediately afterward also is quite blatant. There are instances of the black humor Hitch loved to pull out, most notably when the killer is attempting to reclaim his distinct pin from a body he dumped into a potato sack and the job just isn't going easily. Richard isn't all that likable either, Jon Finch being nothing close to Cary Grant in the charisma department. Several nice shots, particularly the helicopter-based one that flies down the Thames over the credits, show that Hitch did indeed shoot large portions of this on location in London. Some of the most amusing portions occur when the chief police inspector of the case is at home with a wife whose efforts to learn gourmet cooking are all going horribly wrong. It's a damn shame Hitchcock made only two movies in the 70s if this indicates the quality he was capable of.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
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