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Watch any good movies lately?

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Comments

  • DravDrav A Serious Man Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Sucker Punch. The only reason I watched this was because that one reviewer guy compared it to Scott Pilgrim. He's dead.
  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Sucker Punch. The only reason I watched this was because that one reviewer guy compared it to Scott Pilgrim. He's dead.

    I..... liked certain... aspects of that film.
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    No. But I did watch the single worst movie ever made: It's called "The Room." You all need to see this one. It is awe inspiringly terrible.
    Your mother definitely has breast cancer, Rahl.
    It's a terrible movie indeed, but 'worst movie ever made'? Nah, I can think of several that were much more painful. Alexander comes to mind... but I digress. The Rifftrax for The Room is most worthwhile.
    The Adventures of Tintin: Was incredibly apprehensive about seeing this, as the Tintin comic books and animated series were very dear to my heart as a kid. Thankfully, despite some glaring omissions and major artistic license, the movie was very entertaining and a lot of fun. My main issue was the fact they ditched most of Red Rackham's Treasure in favour of throwing in a fair chunk of subplot stuff from Crab With the Golden Claws instead. (SPOILERS: Though from the ending it seems they are setting up having the excised first half of RRT take place in the next film).

    I guess that's par for course with comic book adaptations though. This is the first time I've ever been really intimately familiar with the source material of such a film, after all.

    Hopefully there's more to come. I'd love to see what they do with Flight 714 and Destination Moon/Explorers on the Moon.

    Without a huge Tintin knowledge (I read a number of the books, but at such a young age that I don't remember much), I can say the movie reminded me of the Indiana Jones movies. Fitting, since Steven Spielberg directed all of them. The whole Tintin movie felt like a movie serial condensed into one viewing, and while I don't think it's among his best work, it's certainly enjoyable. As for more movies, this one has done well enough to guarantee them. Lukewarm North American box office receipts are irrelevant, the rest of the world came forth to proclaim a fervent desire for more.

    Speaking of Steven Spielberg, War Horse is also out now. I enjoyed it but didn't love it the way I would have wished. Certainly, the story of a horse that goes from owner to owner along the Western Front in World War I has a lot of great moments, but the narrative as a whole didn't focus quite enough on either the horse or the humans it interacts with to pass up into my top echelon. I'm trying hard to come up with a reason why it didn't do so, and not succeeding right now. Balderdash.
    Mission: Impossible Ghost Protocol. I remember the wire-dangling infiltration and the Chunnel explosions from the first, and the overuse of masks from the second, while I haven't yet seen the third. Doesn't matter, this is one time when the fourth installment of a series is almost certainly the best. Brad Bird may have never directed a live-action movie before, but based on this he's got the knack. The infiltration of the Kremlin in act 1, the amazing stuntwork (that Tom Cruise performed himself) along the Dubai tower, and the tussle with the head villain inside a newfangled Mumbai parking garage in act 3 are all riveting. Minimal CG, so that it's clear everything you're seeing (except a certain famous building blowing up and a missile shooting through the atmosphere) is really happening.
    Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows. I'd rank this above the first Guy Ritchie Holmes movie of two years ago. Sure Rachel McAdams still sticks out like a sore thumb as completely out of place in Victorian England, but she doesn't have as much screen time. Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law still do a great job as Holmes and Watson, while this time the archetypal villain of Moriarty is pulling the strings overtly instead of behind the scenes. Ritchie overdoes an instance of slow motion during an escape from a munitions plant, but otherwise I have no major complaints.
    Lethal Weapon, Lethal Weapon 2, Lethal Weapon 3, Lethal Weapon 4. The creative team was remarkably consistent for all four of these, even down to Michael Kamen and Eric Clapton writing the score for all of them. The first is rather more low-key, not introducing the characters of Martin Riggs (Mel Gibson) and Roger Murtaugh (Danny Glover) until after the credits sequence in which a woman takes a plunge off an LA high-rise. They don't meet the key bad guy Mr. Joshua (Gary Busey) until halfway through the movie. It's necessary in order to get to know them, though. The second has the quite successfully hateful South African bad guys and adds Leo Getz (Joe Pesci) to the mix. Leo's overt comedy changes the tone a bit, but grimness still pervades at points. The third is the least of them, with an opening scene that shows Riggs acting like an idiot for no other reason than the writers couldn't figure out how to get the duo into hot water. Lorna Cole (Rene Russo) does a good job, but having her and Riggs do an action scene without Murtaugh along just feels wrong for some reason, plus this bad guy isn't a patch on the bad guys of the first two. The fourth one has some lesser points but is better than the third, with Butters (Chris Rock) standing out by using obvious standup bits at times but mostly working, and having in Jet Li a villain to take very seriously indeed. Overall a strong series that shows how action movies dealing with the buddy cop formula can do it right, because at almost all times the focus is clearly on Murtaugh and Riggs, two likeable guys who have a great camaraderie.
    Closer. Mike Nichols directs a study of four people in London. Natalie Portman, Jude Law, Clive Owen and Julia Roberts play the foursome, who toss the word 'love' around quite a bit and yet manage to degrade it through their either insincerity or misunderstanding. Partnerships are made and dissolved, and the whole affair is rather unpleasant. Strike that, it's quite unpleasant, since all of these people are revealed as liars and sadists at one point or another. It's well-written and engaging by delivering three-dimensional people, with the side effect of those people having depths of ickiness that renders the task of spending extended time in their presence quite unsavory. Not something I wish to see again any time soon.
    Enchanted. I thought this was an entertaining romp through several transparent Disney personages being tossed into the real world when I saw it four years ago, and I still do. Amy Adams is a joy to watch.
    Cloverfield. I happen to like the found-footage style of movie (if done well), and this was certainly an interesting take on the giant monster movie. Too bad the creature and its - body lice? - are such obvious CG when they appear, but the characters are endearing enough to make their journey through New York's demolished streets interesting.
    Goodfellas. Geez, talk about saving the dynamo for later. Probably the best of all the ones I'm writing about here, this tale of a life journey from 13 year old mob runner to longtime professional crime hitman (Ray Liotta) by Martin Scorsese deserves all the praise it's gotten. Superbly edited, wonderfully acted, excellently scripted, anyone with even the faintest hint of interest in a mob movie needs to see it.
    Iron Man. Robert Downey Jr.'s spot-on casting is exactly what this needed, but a great script with tight direction and good editing helps a lot. Before The Dark Knight was released in 2008, this would easily have been that year's top comic-book derived movie, and holds up with the very best of those even so.
    Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within. I remember liking this based on seeing it in the theater ten years ago, and I still do. Even so, the ultra-realistic character designs don't work with recognizable voice actors. The villain LOOKS like Michael Ironside but has the voice of James Woods, while there's a sidekick who looks generically handsome but has the voice of Steve Buscemi. The climax gets pretty mystical and the whole scenario is hard to swallow (so wait, if a planet's inhabitants are really really sorry that they died like they did, they can persist in ghost form through untold light years until they get the chance to go somewhere else?), but the visuals are very nice and the movie isn't entirely about its unspectacular plot.
    Total Recall. Not exactly a faithful rendition of a Philip K. Dick story, but that doesn't necessarily matter if it manages to be entertaining. This does. Sure, I can observe that using one guy as a shield to block the bullets from a total of six submachine gun clips might not work, but Paul Verhoeven doesn't stop matters long enough to let the impracticality become overbearing. Arnold is not exactly a great thespian, but he's one hell of an action magnet, and that's all he needs to be most of the time here. Even when he does need to stop to let things be exposited, he does a decent enough job that it's not embarrassing.
    I'm tired. Enough for now.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • DravDrav A Serious Man Full Members
    edited January 2012
    I..... liked certain... aspects of that film.
    Yeah, I'd say that's the only reason I watched it to the end.
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    Star Trek (2009). On a second viewing, I stand by my original reaction to this. It's very enjoyable and one of the better Star Trek movies, but far from flawless. Chris Pine and Zachary Quinto do fine jobs as Kirk and Spock, Karl Urban totally nails it as McCoy, J.J. Abrams delivers very good direction.
    Minuses: having seen Kirk's parents and his subsequent barroom brawl, the scene where he as a child goes wild with a car playing the Beastie Boys (really?) is completely unnecessary. The scene with Spock as a child is necessary, not the one with Kirk. To not even bring along a red shirt when these two beam aboard the Romulan ship is frankly astonishing - the two of them are only able to succeed because the Romulans took lessons from stormtroopers in firing accuracy. And of course the remarkably convenient coincidence that Kirk would find old Spock on just the right planet in just the right ice cave - the planet makes sense, but there look to be a lot of ice caves on that planet.
    Nitpicking doesn't detract from an overall very enjoyable movie, though. The Enterprise looks a lot more.... surgical I suppose in this rendition, which I don't remember from the show, but that's fine. It's entertaining and zips along breezily, and J. J. Abrams has enough credibility in Hollywood now that he's able to push back the usually-inflexible release date of the sequel so he can get it just right. Methinks whenever the sequel comes along Klingons will appear.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • SpartakusSpartakus One Knight Stand Full Members
    edited January 2012
    I..... liked certain... aspects of that film.

    Sucker Punch is one of my absolute favorite movies of late. It's a very pro personal assessment, but it managed to cram so much of what I enjoy in life - from young girls, lunatic asylums and brothels to katanas, steampunk warfare, dragons and Bj
  • TheDoomhammerTheDoomhammer Prod with the Prod Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Sucker Punch is a weird movie. I kept feeling like it was actually trying to say something but I had no idea what that something was, besides that Snyder should never be let near a screenplay. Is it an attempt at a commentary on female empowerment? or the illusion of female empowerment? Or just an excuse for Snyder to put all his sexual fetishes onto film? I dunno. All three maybe.

    I thought it was an interesting failure, whatever the answer. But definitely a failure.
  • DravDrav A Serious Man Full Members
    edited January 2012
    I get what he was going for, but it's just so shallow that I can't take it seriously. Men like to ogle women in movies, and this could be construed as misogynistic? ****ing genius insight right there.

    The new Mission Impossible film, on the other hand, is damn near close to being great. If only it had a better villain, and didn't rely so much on the "we're almost there and... oh no! Something went wrong!" routine.
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    The Jerk. Steve Martin made his film starring debut in this, and it does exactly what it needs to do: be funny. If the idea that his character is somehow stupid enough to believe unquestioningly that he did indeed grow up a poor black child doesn't snap your suspension of disbelief circuits, you're ready for this. Whether damning a pair of glasses, being ecstatic about his special purpose, watching Carl Reiner be cross-eyed, protecting his thermos, or watching the horrible epidemic of cat juggling, the script isn't exactly airtight but it IS funny.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • SpartakusSpartakus One Knight Stand Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Sucker Punch is a weird movie. I kept feeling like it was actually trying to say something but I had no idea what that something was, besides that Snyder should never be let near a screenplay. Is it an attempt at a commentary on female empowerment? or the illusion of female empowerment? Or just an excuse for Snyder to put all his sexual fetishes onto film? I dunno. All three maybe.

    Now I see the problem; you guys are overthinking it.

    Personally I hope your last scenario is the truth. The other two are insufferably pretentious and any man who needs to artistically justify girls in short skirts should hand his testicles over to someone who has use for them.
  • DarkRPGMasterDarkRPGMaster A Witness to Destruction Moderators
    edited January 2012
    Uhh Spartakus, there IS one type of man who needs to artistically justify girls in short skirts. The gay kind.
    "Yes, because apparently blindly jumping headfirst into a firefight without a grasp on the situation or any combat experience is a sign of genius these days."
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    The Final Cut. It's not a great sci-fi movie, but it works pretty well. Robin Williams is a Cutter, someone who stitches together footage from Zoes in order to make a Rememory. What are Zoes? They're people implanted at birth with a camera that records everything they see, and when they die, a Cutter sifts through all that footage to put a Rememory together in order for relatives to enjoy a new form of funeral service. The concept may not be accorded all the screen time that it potentially could, but neither is the script completely dumb. Williams is good like he usually is for a dramatic role that requires him to actually play a character instead of doing his standup schtick. I have difficulty believing that some of the twists could arise, considering this technology is many decades old and no one has apparently ever thought to use Zoe footage for corporate backstabbing before - but I'll run with it.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • KeldarusKeldarus RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    edited January 2012
    The girl with the dragon tattoo. The David Fischer version. He really knows how to direct. I loved his rendition on the novel. While I don't love all the changes in the screenplay, I see and accept why he did them. Daniel Craig and Roony Mara had exceptional performances. I hope Fincher gets a chance to bring the other books to screen as well, since I like them better.


    -Kel
  • SpartakusSpartakus One Knight Stand Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Been watching all the X-Men movies lately, as they've been released on bluray. IMO the first one and Last Stand are rather more simple but decent action movies, whereas X-Men 2 taps the potential of the concept far more deeply. In terms of pure action Wolverine is probably the best one, but overall First Class is my favourite; it combines truly epic action sequences with the identity and tolerance themes of X-Men 2, and for me the development of the main characters - especially in light of the previous movies - was handled in a way that made a whole lot of sense and was really satisfying.
  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    First Class was amazing. I love the entire franchise. I actually love the reviled Third one too.
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    War of the Worlds (1953). When it comes to iconic 50s alien invasion movies, this is right at the top. I could wax rhapsodic about it, and how well the thing holds up from my last viewing sometime in the 90s, but I'll just say the sound design is superlative. The sounds those Martian ships make are unmistakeable and instantly arresting.
    War of the Worlds (2005). Another one I could say an awful lot about, but when no one seems to care, why bother? I mostly stand by where I did when seeing it in the theater 6 1/2 years ago. The ending holds with the book's premise, except that last shot Spielberg just had to include so I could groan and get mad over. The effects are a mix of really good and obvious CG, which detracts from their impact sometimes. The vast majority of it works very well though.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • Adriaan den OudenAdriaan den Ouden Δ Hidden Forbidden Holy Ground RPGamer Staff
    edited January 2012
    JuMeSyn wrote: »
    War of the Worlds (1953). When it comes to iconic 50s alien invasion movies, this is right at the top. I could wax rhapsodic about it, and how well the thing holds up from my last viewing sometime in the 90s, but I'll just say the sound design is superlative. The sounds those Martian ships make are unmistakeable and instantly arresting.
    War of the Worlds (2005). Another one I could say an awful lot about, but when no one seems to care, why bother? I mostly stand by where I did when seeing it in the theater 6 1/2 years ago. The ending holds with the book's premise, except that last shot Spielberg just had to include so I could groan and get mad over. The effects are a mix of really good and obvious CG, which detracts from their impact sometimes. The vast majority of it works very well though.

    Plus Morgan Freeman narrating is always awesome, amirite?
    Maybe I'll log out and check my e-mail or something...
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    Plus Morgan Freeman narrating is always awesome, amirite?
    Frankly, I wanted his narration better integrated. Jettison it and you've just lost the only part of the movie not limited to Tom Cruise's point of view.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    We Bought a Zoo. Benjamin Mee (Matt Damon) has been in a funk ever since his wife died six months prior. His son Dylan (Colin Ford) isn't coping well with it at all and gets expelled from school, while his daughter Rosie (Maggie Elizabeth Jones) seems to have a perpetually upbeat personality. In seeking to jump start his existence through relocation, Benjamin ignores the advice of his brother Duncan (Thomas Haden Church) and does exactly what the title promises. Owning a zoo requires being responsible for the welfare and upkeep of the animals though, and while the remaining staff are extremely knowledgeable with regard to their profession, money has to come in from somewhere. Prepping the zoo for a reopening requires leaping a lot of hurdles, and plenty of problems will occur, but maybe, just maybe, things will work out alright.
    The movie has a lot of small and large crises, but there's never any real sense of risk that things won't turn out alright at the end. That's not a huge problem, but particularly near the end when the opening is under threat of being rained out, the impediments just start to get to be too much. Cameron Crowe does a solid job with the script, that much I easily concede. There's just no suspense whatsoever that things are going to go wrong. Dylan's crisis manages to get resolved in no small way thanks to Lily (Elle Fanning) taking an interest in the only person around about her own age, and while his story isn't boring, neither is it as well-developed as it could be. Kelly Foster (Scarlett Johansson) is a good influence on Benjamin, and their scenes together are nice. My favorite would be Thomas Haden Church though, he gets a lot of amusing lines. Rosie didn't go as overboard with the cutesy crap as was possible, but I dislike that sort of thing anyway, so some of her lines grated.
    This is somewhat famously based on a real family, and the only thing Crowe did was swap the locale from England to southern California. It works, just not as a grand slam. Some trimming would have been a good idea, as the movie has several superfluous scenes. Not Crowe's best work by a long shot, but a modest enjoyment. Expect little and it will work out okay.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • RazaRaza Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Just saw My Sassy Girl (Korean Version). Incredible. Just a great script, and great performances.
    Man, the Koreans are really kicking out some thoughtful, interesting movies. Being a fan of Oldboy, the next two movies I am next looking into are both Mr./Lady Vengeance. Hoping they are even half as interesting as Oldboy, and if so, I'll be happy.
    A critic is someone who stands on the mountaintop high above to watch a battle, and then comes down to shoot the survivors.
    -Hemingway
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    The Devil Inside. I knew it would be bad, and I was right. How in the world is this beating Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol at the most recent weekend box office? Ah, but I'm getting ahead of myself.
    The setup is that Maria Rossi managed to kill three people back in October 1989. Apparently an exorcism was being performed at the time, and she was found not guilty by reason of insanity. Then she was institutionalized - in Italy, while she committed the crime in a US state and is a US citizen. Sorry, I can't quite suspend my disbelief enough to allow this. The reasoning is that the Catholic church pushed to have this happen, but this holds no water with me. Anyway....
    It's 2009 and Isabella Rossi, the institutionalized woman's daughter, has just learned what happened and flies to Rome to meet with her mother and learn about exorcisms. She brought along her friend of some variety named Michael, who is recording the whole thing for a documentary on the family story. Attending an exorcism class the Vatican offers, Isabella connects in particular with two priests/exorcists named David and Ben who eventually hold forth with their idea that exorcisms need to be administered even in cases the Church hasn't deemed it necessary for. So this foursome goes to do that with a girl who the Church determined not possessed, before trying their luck with Maria and having some nasty stuff happen.
    The faux-documentary approach means lots and lots of handheld camera shots. This approach felt to me like way too many low-budget TV reality shows that can't be bothered to set up establishing shots and always keep the camera too close, so I didn't like it. The amazing propensity of characters to express themselves in English didn't make sense considering almost all of the movie takes place in Rome, which when last I checked did not have English as its official language. Isabella is an okay character at the beginning, before she starts to act stupid in scenarios for the ostensible reason of being acted upon by demons but the lousy script and shots make it impossible to tell if she's just a moron sometimes. Jittery edits are all over the place because of the faux-documentary approach, letting us jump from day to day with little rhyme or reason. Also, this has one of the most abrupt, dissatisfying endings I can recall. The audience I was with muttered loudly about how much it sucked, and that's the universal reaction, so be prepared for it to end badly. Then the credits scroll along slower than I recall ever seeing them, probably to drag the movie's run time out a bit.
    It didn't really drag, I'll say that (even with the credits moving slower than frozen molasses the thing clocks in under 90 minutes), and if all you want is some profanity and crazy psychotic behavior during the exorcism bits, it's there. The exorcism clients won't make anybody forget Linda Blair though, and whoever this director is (didn't bother to check) he's no William Friedkin. Expect nothing and you'll still get some lousy stuff.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • KeldarusKeldarus RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    edited January 2012
    After Sex A quircky indy comedy that films a handful of couples after sex. It films their converstaions and features Mila Kunis which is how it ended up in my Netflix queue. It was good and while not laugh out loud funny, it was amusing the situations. It's more like a handful of short films all on the same subject rolled into one long feature. I enjoyed it enough to be satisfied even though none of the performances were outstanding, they fit the bill.


    The Babysitters This is the complete opposite of a comedy. It's an intense teen drama about a girl who starts babysitting and then turns her gig into a full out prostitution ring with her friends. Weighty and controversial.. Yep. Sleezy, maybe, but not in the way you would think. It takes more of a personal approach as the main character has control and slowly loses her control on things as the film progresses. It's an interesting film, I'm not sure I like it, but I'm glad I watched it. Katherine Waterson and John Leguizamo were outstanding and were well thought out characters.


    -Kel
  • TheDoomhammerTheDoomhammer Prod with the Prod Full Members
    edited January 2012
    The Devil Inside's ending got a laugh out of me for just how ballsy it is. I have no idea how they looked at that and said "Yes! people will be satisfied with this!" Your
    Spoiler:
    ARG should advertise your movie, not the other way round!
  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Watched 1408 for the billionth time. Highly underrated, atmospheric gem!
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    Bad Day at Black Rock. From a distance, this seems like a Western. It isn't. It's set in the West sure enough, but in 1945, long after the usual concerns have been abandoned. Spencer Tracy is a stranger who gets off the train in Black Rock - a momentous event for such an isolated community. Particularly when this community has a secret, and it relates to the man Tracy seeks, a resident of Japanese descent named Komoko. The incitements of several people in the town are set aside by Tracy, given that only his right arm continues to work. He cheerfully abandons the room he browbeat the hotel clerk into renting when Lee Marvin occupies it, and shrugs off the effort of Ernest Borgnine to run him off the road. He might have allies in the boozehound sheriff Dean Jagger and the cautious doctor/undertaker Walter Brennan - he might not. Hanging above all of them is Robert Ryan, who clearly runs things and doesn't care to let this new character interfere.
    Just a tight, taut thriller with a great eye for its time and place. John Sturges did a very good job on this one.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    The Good Girl. Rather a strange one, but not to the point of being repellent. It also shows that Jennifer Aniston is just fine on those rare occasions when she ventures away from standard rom-com slush to get more adventurous.
    Our scenario is that Justine (Aniston) feels depressed and miserable about her existence as a thirty-year old employee at the Retail Rodeo and married to the amiable pothead Phil (John C. Reilly). Something more interesting seems to beckon in the form of Holden (Jake Gyllenhall), an antisocial new recruit who idolizes The Catcher in the Rye and promptly fixates upon her. He wants sex - she resists for awhile, then gives in. Turns out problems result inevitable, and her husband may be a stoner but is a pretty nice guy at times too.
    I wouldn't classify this as a terribly funny movie, but it does have some humor, quite a bit courtesy of Zooey Deschanel's Cheryl, a less-than-ideal employee for a big retail outlet. Justine is an interesting character well-realized by Aniston, and the script takes pains to give other people in her life a bit more background than they initially appear to possess. Hard to compartmentalize for the sake of pithy blurbs, but it's an investing and rewarding watch.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    The Thing (2011) - Awesome remake/prequel/whatever. People don't seem to be all about it, but I thought it was fantastic.
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    What I thought of the 2011 Thing is in there.
    Funny Face. With pretty much any musical, suspension of disbelief is necessary. Would Fred Astaire and Audrey Hepburn ever fall for each other in the real world, considering the nearly thirty year age difference? Eh, maybe, it's happened in a few cases. Would Audrey Hepburn ever be shunted aside by the editor of a fashion magazine as someone unworthy of any further scrutiny? Now that's a bigger issue. Never mind though.
    Neither of them even appears in the first number, which stars Kay Thompson as the editor in chief of Quality magazine. That first number is Think Pink, as the magazine's focus is directed towards that particular palette above all else. Fred Astaire is a photographer for this magazine, and in the search for a new locale that might make its current top model look intellectual (a challenging task) a bookstore is selected. Audrey Hepburn happens to be the clerk of this establishment, and is rudely shoved out of her own workplace that Thompson might fully shift its inventory to suit the photo shoot. Audrey and Fred start to bond a bit over his effort to pick up the mess with her, and then he picks her face out of an early shot to pinpoint something the magazine needs. She wants to go to Paris to talk about empathicalism with the locals, Fred and Kay go there for work every year, and the plot is in motion.
    Never mind though, musical plots are usually silly. Fred and Audrey dance in a photo development room that's improbably large, Audrey does an offbeat interpretive dance inside a French version of a beatnik lounge, Fred proves that at 58 he can dance more than most people a third his age today can manage, and it looks great because of the CinemaScope and Stanley Donen's experienced eye for great Technicolor visuals. Most of the songs aren't classics but the Gershwins turned out a solid score nevertheless, along with an amusing number in which Fred and Kay attempt to fit in with the French pseudo Beatniks and don't exactly sound like them but keep the energy level high anyway. Audrey's voice is fine, not quite opera singer level, but it makes me wonder why she needed to be dubbed in My Fair Lady - though that was seven years later. A brisk entertaining musical that's not as well known as the principals would seem to ensure, with some snappy dialogue and great visuals.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • deathangel73deathangel73 Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Moneyball a little different from the book, but it does capture the essence of the book with the use of statistics to decide on players to use in a baseball team. Even my wife who doesn't care for baseball liked the movie.

    The Help needless to say I just thought that it was ok and my wife said that it was a lot different from the book. Deals with race relations in Mississippi during the sixties and how some it affects peoples lives on both sides of the issue.
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    Summer Stock. Something set me on a musical bent, and this is a really good one. Judy Garland owns a family farm that in one of the opening scenes sees two longtime workers quit. She's engaged to a local guy named Orville, and while he seems nice enough (if remarkably subservient to his father), the fact that their engagement has lasted four years is a testament to how lukewarm she is on the arrangement. Returning from a trip to town for a tractor investment, she finds that her sister has gone and fallen headlong into another passion, this time acting, which brings with it a couple of dozen actors to occupy the farm's barn. Among the new arrivals is Phil Silvers, who gets to prove that his physical comedy talents are strong, and Gene Kelly, who will of course eventually end up with Judy. Takes a little while to get there though, and the development of their relationship begins with a nice dance-off that proves she's got the talent to keep up with him.
    Anyway, plot isn't the strongest aspect to musicals (even though this one does a good job at it, barring the impossible idea that the performance put on at the end of the movie could be mounted in a barn), the big numbers make it. A really good one takes place in the dining room of the farmhouse, and later Gene Kelly makes a great dance number out of a squeaky board and a newspaper. Like most of the MGM Technicolor musicals this one looks good, and it's a fun time for sure.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
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