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Watch any good movies lately?

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  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Contagion - An amazing ensemble flick by guess who? Steven Sod. He's really active these days, and to me, that is a good thing! Still hope he goes Sci-Fi again some time, but who knows with this guy.
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    Buried Alive. I got curious about Frank Darabont's career, and this TV movie from 1990 is the first feature with his name at the helm. It's never been released on DVD, so scratchy VHS copies are all I can judge it by. The movie is interesting. It feels like a TV movie in most aspects, but enough bits rise above the norm to make it a pleasant watch, though never a particularly engaging one.
    The setup is simple. Tim Matheson is the owner of a lucrative business, and he loves his wife (Jennifer Jason Leigh), but she doesn't like being in the country. At all. There's a moment when she reconsiders the course about to be taken, but it doesn't last long, and otherwise her character is pretty one-note. She's having an affair with William Atherton, who plays this like Walter Peck would if he wanted something from a woman. They concoct a scheme to kill off Matheson using the poison of a puffer fish to simulate the symptoms of a heart attack, and she'll then cheaply bury him to prevent an autopsy or anything else that could reveal the truth. This serves to allow the title to come to pass though, and once Matheson discovers what's happened, he eventually starts to formulate a plan for vengeance.
    Simple story, and feels like a TV movie for the most part. Matheson doesn't instantly become an avenger though, and his gradual self-exhumation followed by attempting to recoup his wits and clean himself up is pretty well done. One scene involving a sink full of hydrogen peroxide and hands that are a bloody mess succeeds in looking really nasty despite the TV restrictions. The finale gets into some head games a bit, as he uses his construction skills to make a maze inside his house while Leigh and Atherton have a falling out. Hoyt Axton is the local sheriff, though he could have used more screen time. Not a major endeavor that rises above the restrictions of the format, but a moderately enjoyable one.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    The Last Man on Earth. The title may not sound immediately familiar, but if I say this story was later made into The Omega Man and I Am Legend, will that kindle some memory? I think it will.
    Anyone familiar with those other pictures or the novel all these movies are based upon will know the basic scenario. A man, Robert Morgan, wanders the streets by day killing the vampire-like creatures people have become. His narration is the only voice for quite awhile, thinking to himself as various tasks are performed during the hours of sunlight so that he is prepared to face the onslaught by night. Eventually a flashback reveals what happened, more or less: a virus arrived from overseas that appeared to have a universal infection rate. The authorities took to burning the bodies of the many, many dead. Morgan refuses to let that happen when his wife dies, and the result is that she shows up on the doorstep in a form most definitely not that of a cured woman. Such definitely explains the anxieties of Mr. Morgan, especially when a former friend keeps calling his name every night as the infected attack his house.
    Vincent Price plays Mr. Morgan, and his voice is a good one for holding interest. Many scenes do a good job displaying the abandonment of the metropolitan area, filled only with corpses by day. Most of the movie is strong, with the exception being at the end when a remarkably lackadaisical chase through several buildings after Morgan seemingly lost his ability to hear a clear warning shows how a conclusion can go awry. The final shots are good, but the way they're arrived at doesn't work. On balance worth seeing, but be prepared for a dissatisfying climax.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • TheDoomhammerTheDoomhammer Prod with the Prod Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Saw Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy On Sunday, and again today. Loved it both times. Gary Oldman was brilliant but I think my favourite performance was by Mark Strong, who knocked it out of the park.
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    The Eagle Has Landed. Adolf Hitler was in one of his moods, and commanded an operation to kidnap Winston Churchill. What at first seems like just a placation is further explored by Colonel Radl (Robert Duvall) and he thinks it just might work. Lead by Colonel Steiner (Michael Caine) and aided on the ground by early-arriving Liam Devlin (Donald Sutherland) a plot to bag Churchill on his journey to an isolated English village by the sea. Assuming kidnap fails, assassination is still a perfectly acceptable outcome for the Reich....
    Based on a Jack Higgins novel, the setup process does take awhile here. That's my only real complaint, because the portion before much actually happens is fairly long. Once the action in England starts, everything fires on pretty much all cylinders. Well, having Donald Pleasence playing Heinrich Himmler is also an issue, because Himmler only has a couple of scenes and isn't able to blend into the action so well since the actor and character don't look much alike.
    On the ground, since Devlin arrives early, we get to spend some time watching his interactions with the locals, particularly a woman named Molly (Jenny Agutter). As an Irishman with very strong feelings about the English, his motivations make sense of a sort. Then once the unit is airdropped using a salvaged British plane and wearing Polish uniforms, things really start picking up. Want some action? Well, an American unit is in the area commanded by Larry Hagman, and events pick up once the plot begins to reveal itself. This was John Sturges' final film, and while I wouldn't classify it as his best, he went out on a very solid note.

    Home Alone aged fairly well for me - except in one respect. The climax just doesn't work for me anymore. Seeing Harry and Marv get abused like live action Looney Tunes is no longer funny to me. The rest of the movie works pretty well, but not that part. Odd considering I loved it as a kid.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Saw Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy On Sunday, and again today. Loved it both times. Gary Oldman was brilliant but I think my favourite performance was by Mark Strong, who knocked it out of the park.

    Such an absurdly amazing film its unreal.
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    The Boys From Brazil. Ex-Nazis in Paraguay are up to something. Something important enough that a young man spying on their meeting was summarily caught and executed. Whatever it is, it involves the death of a variety of civil servants in many nations who are married to considerably younger women and have a son of about 13. An Austrian Nazi hunter is on the case, trying to figure out what Dr. Joseph Mengele is attempting to do. His persistence does not make him a favorite of the doctor.
    A pretty strong thriller, up until the actual Nazi plan is revealed, which I just can't believe would warrant the decades of research and development that have been spent on it. Gregory Peck is calm and menacing as Mengele, almost making me wish he'd played the villain more often because his body type is so appropriate for it. Laurence Olivier is the Nazi hunter, and does a good job as usual. James Mason is accorded far too little screen time as the internal security among the Nazis, so the role could have been played by a lesser-known actor and not come out the worse. These three aren't the first to be seen, though. Instead, Steven Guttenberg is the one who gets the plot rolling, and while he's okay I couldn't set aside what he would later be known for entirely.
    Solid in its middle portion, tense until the end, but with a central Nazi plot that defies logic. I'm glad I saw it, but universally stellar it isn't.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close felt a lot like that. Maybe not to the degree of having my head placed inside a car with a stereo system that rattles whole blocks using its full power, but I sure didn't have a good time.
    Our premise is simple enough. Oskar Schell (Thomas Horn) is searching New York for whatever a key his father seems to have left behind will open. The only clue is that the key was within an envelope with the word Black on it, so he sets out to interview everyone in New York with that surname. Why is he undertaking this quest? Well, because his father Thomas Schell (Tom Hanks) was in the World Trade Center on 9/11 and his son is convinced there must be some reason the key was left behind.
    This movie rubbed me the wrong way with its opening shot of extremely close-up and blurry parts of a man falling through the air in incredibly slow motion, which seemed pointless and unnecessarily artsy. Then Oskar rubbed me the wrong way by announcing that more people are alive on earth today than have lived through its entire prior history. Wrong. Oskar is a wordy kid, and while he's clearly intelligent, he comes across as a jerk to me. Undertaking this quest without ever consulting his mother (Linda Schell, played by an underused Sandra Bullock) seems like a really insensitive thing to do. He mentions once that he was tested for Asperger's, helping to explain his apparently fierce agoraphobia. When listing the many many things that disturb him outside, the improbability of this quest really hit me. If people talking loudly is disturbing, how in the seven hells did he ever traipse with only his feet all over New York? Bah.
    The central part of the movie, in which he visits many people named Black to see who might have the lock that needs opening, feels like it should have been more interesting than it is. This kid says some weird things sometimes, and I guess since it's taking place in 2002 New Yorkers are more apt to explain that away when they know what happened to his father, but it just seems strange to me. Max von Sydow plays The Renter, who has the baffling character trait of not speaking (presumably ever since as a child his parents were killed during the bombing of Germany) and using notebook pages to write things down. von Sydow does the best he can with this, but it's a silly gimmick that allows for several cute moments when Oskar needs a pal during his search.
    Sandra Bullock's character is underutilized. The one scene in the movie not told from Oskar's perspective, when she flashes back to 9/11 for a phone call from her husband while watching the WTC smoking, hints at a far more interesting story than the one actually being told. That flashback incidentally arises after Oskar bursts out that he wishes she had been in the towers that day, which needs more explanation. We see too little of the mother and son interacting prior to 9/11 to know if he actually didn't relate to her well or if 'the worst day' is what triggered this. John Goodman is wasted in a thankless role as an apartment guard with screen time that totals less than two minutes and mostly showcases Oskar acting like a jerk to him. The supposedly tear-jerking feel-good climax just angered me, since it raises a lot of questions that weren't addressed in the movie. The whole thing runs too long - this story could have been told with half an hour sheared off to make a tighter sit. The issue of a child with poor social skills unable to accept his father's death could easily make for an investing movie. This isn't that movie, and apparently some of its ads have managed to get under New Yorker skins with their shameless 9/11 imagery. Why this got a surprise Best Picture nomination baffles me - even among the movies I've actually seen from last year, worthier candidates were pretty much ignored. Not an experience I will look back on favorably.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • SpartakusSpartakus One Knight Stand Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Anyone seen any of Roger Corman's sword and sorcery movies from the 80s? I've been watching some of them lately - The Warrior and the Sorceress, Barbarian Queen, Deathstalker I and II - and they're absolutely hilarious. The movies are just so over the top cheesy and cliched while still (seemingly) taking themselves seriously, that the end result is actually some of the best mindless entertainment I've had in a while. I particularly like how more or less every woman in these movies has her boobs fall out at some point.

    The script deserves a special mention. Some of these lines will remain with me forever. Here's a taste:

    Bystander: "Will freedom triumph?"

    Barbarian Queen: "FREEDOM ALWAYS TRIUMPHS!"
  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Watched Drive for the first time since the theaters. Such an incredibly effective movie. The random bursts are violence lend an otherwise fairly even keeled performance by Gosling an air of menace that permeates the whole flick, especially if you've seen it before.
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    Haywire. Steven Soderbergh dabbles in every genre under the sun, and does well enough of the time that I'm perfectly okay with it. This one is a pretty bare-bones action movie, with a plot that's not exactly original involving our protagonist having been betrayed and seeking the one who did it. Said protagonist is Mallory Kane (Gina Carano), an employee with a private company contracted to provide services of either a protective or destructive nature regarding individuals. As revealed through flashback, Kane was set up when a client she nabbed from Barcelona turned up dead and her boss Kenneth (Ewan McGregor) seems to have signed off on it. The practical result of this is that she beats the crap out of Channing Tatum in the opening scene, then has a knockdown with Michael Fassbender later on, and eventually a slugfest in her father's (Bill Paxton) home before the finale. Her experience in MMA means stunt doubling isn't necessary, and the fights look quite painful, which is exactly how they should be. Michael Douglas and Antonio Banderas are around to lend further star power, but Carano is just fine here in a role that admittedly demands nothing more than that she look no-nonsense and committed. Since that's not always achieved by actors, kudos to her. Not too long, this one crams quite a bit into 90 minutes, and if it gets a sequel I'll see it eagerly.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Watched a few episodes of the final season of Smallville, and Super 8 last night. Smallville is terrible but awesome, and Super 8 is always fun.
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    The Shawshank Redemption. I'd actually never seen the whole thing, just bits and pieces from random TV broadcasts. Now I know why it's so acclaimed. Most of it's in the early parts, but the movie doesn't soft pedal the reality of being in prison. Based solely on the first half, there isn't even really a villain (unless the "sisters" who keep grabbing Tim Robbins in back rooms count), leaving more time to explore what being in prison means. James Whitmore's character interlude isn't strictly necessary from a narrative standpoint, but it adds a whole lot of meaning to how reluctant longtime inmates are to leave. Even less necessary from a strict narrative standpoint is Robbins' playing opera over the broadcast system for the prison, but it helps establish what makes him tick more than most other things in the movie. The ending goes on a bit too long and could have been trimmed, but it works.
    Oh, and here's a movie with a Morgan Freeman voiceover that really hits it.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • RainaRaina Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Have you ever read the short story? It's really good. I just got done watching Real Steel. Sure it's like Rock Em Sock Em Robots, but it was pretty good with interesting characters and cool robot fight scenes.
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    I know, I know, Stephen King's writing goes all over the place into many genres, but I'm still too freaked out from reading Pet Sematary (NOT a good movie) to pick up another one of his for a little while.
    Pee-wee's Big Adventure. It's now been 27 years since this was made, putting Tim Burton onto the list of big directorial talent. Not that it really matters, Pee-wee exists outside of time and place for the most part. The beginning is rougher going than I remembered (been six years or so since I last watched it), as Pee-wee left to his own devices is kind of annoying. His house is awesome, but he really needs to interact with people in order to get interesting. Good thing it's not long before Francis enters the picture, the bike is stolen, and the wackiness just goes everywhere. Honestly, why is Francis (and his father) dressed the way Kim Jong Il was? Did the movie influence North Korea's not-beloved dictator? Once Pee-wee gets onto the road it's pretty much one memorable part after another, and I always loved the idea of a speedboat with waterskiing extras towing Santa's sleigh with Godzilla in the seat through the Warner Bros. backlot. Danny Elfman nailed the score too. The DVD has four deleted scenes: the first two of Pee-wee meeting Amazing Larry and hitching a ride with a guy in Texas who has a bear in his back seat are good, the third of the motorcycle gang meeting him in the hospital isn't, and the extension of the studio backlot chase is a mixed bag that really needed better integration with Elfman's score (it's clearly a workprint source) to fit as it should.
    "There's no basement in the Alamo!"
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Raina wrote: »
    Have you ever read the short story? It's really good. I just got done watching Real Steel. Sure it's like Rock Em Sock Em Robots, but it was pretty good with interesting characters and cool robot fight scenes.

    Thank you. I loved this flick, but not one of my friends were on the same page.
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    Beetle Juice. I struggled to remember whether I'd ever actually seen it. I'd seen the cartoon show many times as a kid, but the movie it was spawned from? Not one of those I watched over & over.
    Adam (Alec Baldwin) and Barbara Maitland (Geena Davis) have a problem. They're dead, and according to the somewhat obtuse rules of the newly dead, they have to spend 125 years in their place of residence at the time of becoming deceased. That means learning to get along (not live) with the Deetzes. Lydia (Winona Ryder) can see them and seems pretty happy with the idea, but Charles (Jeffrey Jones) is a peculiar mix of overjoy at finally living in the country and falcon-like fascination at the opportunities for development of the area, and Delia (Catherine O'Hara) wants to pretty much gut the house and turn it into something more amenable to her Vanity Fair-inspired tastes. After a visit from Juno their after-death case worker (Sylvia Sydney) the Maitlands put their strongest efforts toward getting the Deetzes out. That might just make them resort to using somebody they were expressly warned about, though: the eponymous character (Michael Keaton).
    It's a Tim Burton movie through and through. Crazy visual stuff is going on in just about every scene after the introduction, and the obvious green screens at play in many scenes just reminds how different effects were before CGI would have been employed to smooth everything out and remove the unique flavor. I've always liked stop-motion animation, and while Beetlejuice isn't overflowing with it, every appearance is charming.
    Alec Baldwin really has aged over the years. Back when this was made, he was a romantic lead. Geena Davis's career hasn't exactly come back from her 80's heyday, but that's rather like a lot of actresses who find quality roles harder to get as they age. Jeffrey Jones is entertaining as usual, Catherine O'Hara is good at being a character no one will like, Winona Ryder is an incredibly fashionable goth whose outfits seem to have been observed by George Lucas when it came time to clothe Amidala in the Phantom Menace (seriously, take a look at some of them!), Sylvia Sydney has sure aged since working for the studios back in the 30s but at least kept getting regular work up until she died, Robert Goulet appears for a little while just to do what he usually does, and then there's Michael Keaton. For inspiring the movie's title we don't see an awful lot of him, probably to keep his used car salesman for the dead approach from getting old. That's a wise approach, because he does dominate the screen whenever he appears.
    The climax seems kinda rushed, as if a few shots were left out (since when can anyone ride a sandworm?). The ending is fitting though. Crazy Tim Burton puts together an entertaining and sometimes funny supernatural spook show.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Last night: Dream House. Probably one of the worst movies ever.
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    Starship Troopers. Truly a mixed bag, pretty much all the good can be chalked up to the source material and Paul Verhoeven. Casper Van Dien and Denise Richards try and fail to become respectable actors, and none of the characters are interesting except when the actor brings something to the table. Like Michael Ironside - when he returns to the movie, things are good for awhile. I can respect Van Dien's effort to memorialize the character, but hearing lines Michael Ironside uttered from Van Dien's mouth just doesn't work: he can't make them nearly as arresting. The transformation that happens to these two I more or less accept, but it sure could've been handled better, especially Richards who just smiled all the way through her training and never had any scarring incident except at the end. Neil Patrick Harris, on the other hand, pretty much vanishes for most of the movie and finally shows up again near the end. What was his military inductance like? We'll never know. Those fights with bugs also display that military technology really hasn't adapted in the future to deal with opponents that can take multiple holes and keep coming, plus the CG is fairly apparent, though pretty good for 1997.
    Sounds like I'm coming down pretty hard, and I hadn't even started with some of the things that just make no sense, like why artificial arms that work completely can be built in the future but not even peg legs. Still, Verhoeven keeps things moving quickly, and the many bizarre and/or nonsensical things that happen (honestly, is being whipped truly believed to effectively punish a soldier for an accident while training?) don't keep the pace from remaining strong when the movie hits the two hour mark, and lots of crazy things that are entertaining from happening. Apparently enough people liked it to spawn a couple of direct-to-video sequels. I wouldn't go that far, but it's interesting on its own merits.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Starship Troopers is a freaking classic.
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    Part one of the Bogie & Bacall Collection: To Have and Have Not.
    Based on an Ernest Hemingway book is really stretching matters. Howard Hawks and his screenwriters threw out almost everything from the book, and instead we have something that expressly apes Casablanca. We again have Humphrey Bogart (playing Harry Morgan here, even though the actor was already at work in Hollywood) in a situation where he's trying to keep his neutrality while both sides want his help. There's even another fat man, though it's not Sidney Greenstreet here. The plot is fine but not revelatory: Morgan owns a fishing boat on Martinique that French resistance personnel want to commandeer for transporting people between the islands. He only does so once his previous client gets shot right before he can sign over a bunch of traveler's checks for the money owed, but transporting these people goes expressly against the orders of the Vichy government officials on the island.
    The good stuff comes when the plot is less important. Mostly when Lauren Bacall enters the picture, and the flames between her and Bogie immediately light. Walter Brennan is fun too, like he usually was, as an odd first mate of Bogie's who likes to ask if anybody was ever stung by a dead bee and lives off alcohol like most people live off air. Compared to Casablanca, it's not so much. On its own merits it's a blast.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • QuinQuin ne cede malis RPGamer Staff
    edited January 2012
    Interstella 5555: The 5tory of the 5ecret 5tar 5ystem

    Daft Punk + Leiji Matsumoto = Weird + Awesome
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    befriend (v.): to use mecha-class beam weaponry to inflict grievous bodily harm on a target in the process of proving the validity of your belief system.
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    The Bogie & Bacall Collection, part two: The Big Sleep.
    It begins with Philip Marlowe (Humphrey Bogart) being put on the case of finding a lost man considered to be like a son to the General (Charles Waldron). He meets the two daughters of the General while in the mansion, Carmen (Martha Vickers) who seems to have serious substance issues, and Vivian (Lauren Bacall) who's much more levelheaded. Conducting research on the proceedings like the diligent PI he is, Marlowe has an unmistakable fling with a bookstore owner, before finding Carmen drugged out of her wits at the scene of a murder. From there... well, this is reputedly one of the most confusing movies ever made for those trying to follow the plot closely, and I can see why. Plenty of bodies turn up before it's all over, but keeping track of who they are (especially when one of them was never introduced onscreen) and why they're dead and what effect it has on the overall story is a task demanding flow charts and a reading of the Raymond Chandler book from which the story was derived, most likely. It doesn't matter anyway. Howard Hawks nails the film noir look with aplomb, and Bogie and Bacall interact in the same way they did in To Have and Have Not. So what if the plot isn't completely clear, it doesn't impact how entertaining this paramount film noir is.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • DarkRPGMasterDarkRPGMaster A Witness to Destruction Moderators
    edited January 2012
    2012

    Wow...just wow. I laughed so hard at this film, as it was so horrid that I couldn't help it. They spent $200 million on this piece of crap? I would go into why I find this horrid, but I'm sure anybody who has watched this knows why. Before I read that Roland Emmerich did this, I was actually questioning if Uwe Boll did this, because this was as bad as his stuff.
    "Yes, because apparently blindly jumping headfirst into a firefight without a grasp on the situation or any combat experience is a sign of genius these days."
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    Nah, it's not Uwe Boll-bad, Dark. I'll say this for Roland Emmerich, he can direct action sequences clearly and comprehensibly. That part with John Cusack driving the limo through the streets of LA falling into the earth may have looked like a video game, but I could understand what was going on without difficulty.
    Not that 2012 is a good movie, because it isn't. Understand I praise only one aspect. Disaster movies CAN work, but the script for this one was just sub-moronic, with my favorite stupid moment probably being when the tectonic plates of the Earth have moved several thousand miles for no reason except that the plane needed to crash land and keep the plot barreling along instead of having the cast all drown in the south Pacific. A second might be when the flood waters have gone so high as to make ships crash into the peak of Everest - did the oceans of the world just surge over like somebody doing a cannonball into a bathtub? Actors and their talents wasted across the board in the service of something even stupider than a lot of 70s disaster flicks, and that's saying something when a certain type of those (the Airport movies) spawned Airplane!
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • KeldarusKeldarus RPGamer Staff RPGamer Staff
    edited January 2012
    JuMeSyn wrote: »
    The Bogie & Bacall Collection, part two: The Big Sleep.
    It begins with Philip Marlowe (Humphrey Bogart) being put on the case of finding a lost man considered to be like a son to the General (Charles Waldron). He meets the two daughters of the General while in the mansion, Carmen (Martha Vickers) who seems to have serious substance issues, and Vivian (Lauren Bacall) who's much more levelheaded. Conducting research on the proceedings like the diligent PI he is, Marlowe has an unmistakable fling with a bookstore owner, before finding Carmen drugged out of her wits at the scene of a murder. From there... well, this is reputedly one of the most confusing movies ever made for those trying to follow the plot closely, and I can see why. Plenty of bodies turn up before it's all over, but keeping track of who they are (especially when one of them was never introduced onscreen) and why they're dead and what effect it has on the overall story is a task demanding flow charts and a reading of the Raymond Chandler book from which the story was derived, most likely. It doesn't matter anyway. Howard Hawks nails the film noir look with aplomb, and Bogie and Bacall interact in the same way they did in To Have and Have Not. So what if the plot isn't completely clear, it doesn't impact how entertaining this paramount film noir is.


    I need to watch this again, haven't seen it since college, always had a fun time watching it :)


    -Kel
  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    The Room (2004) Enough said....
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
  • RazaRaza Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    I'm a Cyborg, but that's OK

    Quite possibly the weirdest movie I have ever seen. It's like a wacky Korean version of One Flew Over the Cukoo's Nest (sort of, best comparison I can make). Unbelievably random and often quite funny with really good performances. The lead female gets committed to a psychiatric ward by her mother because the girl believes she is a cyborg and doesn't eat. She meets some really weird cases in there including a guy who eventually tries to help her eat (he likes to wear masks and walk around with knees bent like an egyptian). Ah, any more would be giving it away. It starts slow but stick with it for the first 10 mins and you'll be rewarded to a really offbeat and funny movie.
    A critic is someone who stands on the mountaintop high above to watch a battle, and then comes down to shoot the survivors.
    -Hemingway
  • Mike MoehnkeMike Moehnke Code: Kirin Administrators
    edited January 2012
    The Bogie and Bacall collection, part three: Dark Passage.
    This is the forgotten one in Humphrey and Lauren's duo, mostly because we go from two movies directed by the legendary Howard Hawks to one directed by ... Delmer Daves? Nevertheless, it's quite interesting.
    Partly it's because I love movies set in San Francisco, which this movie eventually makes the most of. The Bogie & Bacall chemistry is still there, too.
    Setup is this: Vincent Parry (Bogart) just broke out of San Quentin. He hitches a ride with a man away from the prison but a sudden radio broadcast clues the driver in to his passenger's identity, and Parry knocks him out. Then Irene Jensen (Bacall) comes along and offers her services in getting him through police barricades and into the city. Not exactly having much choice in the matter, he accepts this mysterious offer of aid. Upon passing into San Francisco, Irene's story comes out: her father was wrongly convicted and died in prison, so she's devoted to making sure the same thing doesn't happen again. Vincent has to prove his innocence of the charge he was convicted, killing his wife. Doing so requires that his far-too recognizable face be changed, and a friendly cab driver just might be able to help do that. Once he's free to investigate without being turned in immediately, it'll be time to have words with the woman whose testimony put him away, Madge (Agnes Moorehead).
    The approach is the unique thing about this movie. Most of the first third is shot in first-person, and those parts that aren't never put Vincent's face in the light. Kudos to the cinematography making the most of the ways in which black & white is uniquely suited for such an approach, and considering how much bulkier cameras were 65 years ago the first-person bits are pretty effective, with Bogart's voiceover helping keep the character clear in our minds. Once Vincent has some plastic surgery, he's swaddled in bandages for awhile and can't talk, leaving Irene to try protecting him from disturbances until they can come off. Only after the bandages are off does Bogart's face come into the clear, and it's at this point that the standard trappings of noir can be followed. It's an interesting case, and while the ending is abstractly admirable for the way it doesn't strictly follow the Hays code, it's not very satisfying. Not horrible though, and what leads up to it surpassed my expectations to be quite investing.
    It's not what he's eating, but what's eating him that makes it ... sort of interesting.
  • Confessor RahlConfessor Rahl Member Full Members
    edited January 2012
    Watched two episodes of Spartacus: Blood and Sand last night. Always a great show to get back into. Prepping for the new one right now.
    "Back when FF9 was coming out. People were rejoicing because it was actually a fantasy game and not a sci-fi game like 7 and 8. It's hilarious in modern context, with everyone wanking themselves to dehydration at the thought of a FF7 remake."
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